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Old Oct 16, 2007, 2:39 PM   #1
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Hello All;

I take alot of panoramas for virtual tours etc..

I would really like to purchase a high quality wide angle lense and im torn between the Sigma 8mm fisheye OR the Canon 10-22mm wide angle..

1. Is there a bigdifference between these two lenses? Im not talking quality, im talking actual photo.

2. Will the 10-22 mm canon not be as efficient for 360 panoramas?

Im just not crazy about the barrel distortion the 8mm Sigma give and im wondering if i can get away with using the 10-22mm lense. That lense could be used for more purposes than just shooting panoramas.

If i do purchase the8mm cani use it for everyday wideangle shots???



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Old Oct 16, 2007, 6:16 PM   #2
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The 8mm Sigma fisheye is meant for full frame or 35mm film cameras so won't give full 180 degree coverage for an APS DSLR. In addition fisheye lenses mean BARREL distortion (with capital B) which will make it almost impossible to stitch into a panorama.

There is software to defish these lenses but the results don't warrant the effort as the edges go mushy from being stretched.

On the other hand, the Canon 10-22mm or Sigma 10-20mm ultra wide lenses have barely noticable barrel distortion and will easily make panoramas. I have used the Sigma 10-20mm on a Nikon D70s with much success.
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Old Oct 17, 2007, 8:15 AM   #3
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Hello Bob and thanks...

I did think that the 8mm fisheye was exactly for panorama's......hmmm

The 10-22 mm is my first choice because yes, i thought i could do alot more than just panorama's with it....i understand that people leave that lense on as their everyday lense....



what is the difference in "WIDTH"? of the pictures each take. I know the 10-22mm will not get the full cieling but it should get close... correct?



What i mean is, does the fisheye take that much wider pictures????



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Old Oct 17, 2007, 12:34 PM   #4
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You might consider another wonderful (IMHO), fun little fisheye that is very cost effective. I've used it for a bit over a year, often with my Nodal Ninja, and have no problems making QTVR or regular panos. It's the Tokina 10-17mm fisheye. IQ is great, and while it is not Canon "L" glass, I have found myself using it more and more for all kinds of photos (flowers; bugs; aircraft and radial aircraft engines; graveyards; surreptitious no-focus, no framing, from the hip shots; etc.



See/read a bit about it here: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tokina/10-17mm.htm

FWIW, while I am sure detail etc. will be lost, the attached image was taken with the Tokina.


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Old Oct 17, 2007, 12:39 PM   #5
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very cool photo. i guess im just wondering if it is worth it to buy the sigma...simply because its a fisheye and that all it is...i can use the canon 10-22 for everyday shooting but the fisheye only will go on to do panos....

the canon 10-22 can also do pano's but i beleive i will have to take more pictures???? i cant imagine the 2mm difference would make that much of an issue????? or will it???


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Old Oct 17, 2007, 8:16 PM   #6
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Check out http://bobatkins.com/photography/tec...d_of_view.html for an explanation of the difference between Rectilinear and Fishye Lenses.

Also look at the Ken Rockwell page posted by Henry where he posts an example of a fisheye photo. See all the curved lines and try and imagine how you will stitch several of these images together. This is what I mean by barrel distortion with fisheye lenses.
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Old Oct 18, 2007, 1:55 AM   #7
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Bob is completely correct of course.

Panorama can mean different things, but for stiched panoramas a fisheye, even a very wide angle rectilinear is the wrong lens.

When stitching you ideally want as little distortion as possible so for best results a moderate wide-angle that controls distortion well is your best bet. Usually something like a 35mm equivalent does the trick very well. So about 24mm on a crop camera. A standard Canon kit lens set to around 20mm and f8 and a decent tripod with panoramic head works very nicely for this purpose. In fact spending the money on a good tripod and head and some good stitching software will probably help you far more than spending the money on an expensive lens.

Don't forget that even the lowly kit lens is pretty good at f8, expensive lenses are expensive because they are good at all apertures. Stitching 5-10 shots on a 10Mp camera is going to give you a very high resolution final image that can be printed very large if you need to.

Fisheye lenses are great if you want that very specific fisheye effect.

Ordinary wide-angle lenses are great to get good coverage in a single shot without stitching.
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:16 AM   #8
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I know this is a very old thread, but it ranks very high on Google for a search for 8mm fisheye. I'm posting to clear up a misconception.

Fisheye lenses are absoltely perfect for panoramas. Especially the type mentioned by the thread author: virtual tour (spherical) panoramas. All dedicated panorama software can use fisheye pictures with great results, especially when making spherical panoramas.

In fact, fisheye pictures are actually ideal. It requires fewer images to make a full 180 x 360 pano (eight images from an 8mm) and it is easier for the software to automatically find control points for the alignment process than with ultrawide rectilinear lenses.

I'm talking about dedicated panorama software like PTGui or Hugin.

I shoot all of my spherical panoramas with a Peleng 8mm fisheye lens. It only takes six vertical shots around the horizon plus one shot for the zenith and one handheld shot for the nadir.

You can find exaples of my photos on flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/elusive...7600092985258/

All of these were taken with a fisheye lens and stitched in PTGui.

Last edited by ToddMoon; Apr 1, 2011 at 1:18 AM. Reason: typo
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Old Apr 12, 2011, 9:52 PM   #9
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Awesome, thanks for sharing
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Old Apr 13, 2011, 12:59 AM   #10
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Another lens to consider now (not when this thread was started) is Sigma's 8-16. Not a fisheye camera, but extremely wide angle. Designed for use only on cropped sensor cameras. The FF equivalent is their 12-24.
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