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Old Dec 23, 2007, 10:33 AM   #1
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Can someone point me to a thread, article ect. that has pics taken with different telephoto lenses that also have the yardage at which they were taken? I see plenty of articles with telephoto lenses but I haven't seen any that list how far away the subject was when the photo was taken. I'm getting ready to buy a dslr and plan on taking some fairly long range photos (100-200 yards) and am curious as to what I can expect as far as zoom goes and quality of the photo itself. I appreciate the help and thank you in advance.
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Old Dec 23, 2007, 11:04 AM   #2
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How big is your subject?

It matters rather a lot. A little bird at 10 yards is very far away (think 400mm lens at least), but a person at 10 yards is so much bigger that a 50mm might be fine.
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Old Dec 23, 2007, 11:12 AM   #3
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Thinking along the lines of deer, fox, gators. Maybe a few long range soccer pics for my nephews.
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Old Dec 24, 2007, 11:52 AM   #4
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Bayoublaster400 wrote:
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I'm getting ready to buy a dslr and plan on taking some fairly long range photos (100-200 yards) and am curious as to what I can expect as far as zoom goes and quality of the photo itself.
Oh, you could probably get by with a 800mm lens. Seriously - you're not going to take a photo of a fox from 200 yards away. I use a 100-400 lens for wildlife and you could probably get a deer at about 70 yards with 400mm but it would be a bit soft. A fox you're looking at maybe 30 yards with a 400mm lens.

Now, the soccer shots I can definitely speak to as I shoot primarily sports. A quality 300mm lens is good for quality shots to about 40 yards. A quality 400mm lens is good to between 50-60 yards. And that is with QUALITY lenses - not cheap consumer grade lenses that become very soft when you zoom them out.

So I think you need to re-adjust your expectations regarding what kind of shots you'll be able to take with your new camera. You can't shoot subjects as far away as you think you can.
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Old Dec 25, 2007, 1:04 AM   #5
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not going to get much of a pic at 100-200 yds even of deer at 400mm. here's a 100% crop at 400mm and about 150yds. not even a good shot but, should give you some sort of idea. This will definitely not make any sort of useful print!

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Old Dec 25, 2007, 10:15 AM   #6
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Thanks. That's what I was looking for. At leat now I have a good idea what I can expect. Now I know what kind of lense I can expect to be toting around. Just have to decide on the right dslr for my needs. I was sold on the new Sony until I found out it didn't have a Live view so now I have to start my research all over again. At least now I'm halfway there as far as figuring out what type of lense I'll need. Thanks again and Merry Christmas!!!
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Old Dec 25, 2007, 10:46 AM   #7
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Bayoublaster400 wrote:
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I was sold on the new Sony until I found out it didn't have a Live view so now I have to start my research all over again.
I'd read the reviews on Live View carefully (and make sure to try it out in a store). It doesn't work as well as it does with a Point and Shoot model.

For example, you don't have Autofocus when in Live View mode with the EOS-40D. Instead, you either have to use manual focus (and you can magnify your view for that purpose), or use Autofocus without the mirror flipped out of the way to give you the live view (because the Autofocus sensors can't see to focus when the mirror is up for live view mode). This adds time and and effort to the Autofocus procedure.

In addition, because the LCD doesn't move, you do not have any viewing angle benefits from using it either.

IOW, it's best used for static subjects (and even then, the benefits of it are questionable, other than for marketing purposes).

Now, some of the newer cameras do allow Contrast Detection Autofocus using the camera's main sensor during Live View mode. For example, the new Nikon D300 has this feature. But, from reports I've seen, it doesn't work as well as Autofocus using the main AF sensors (which won't work in Live View mode, since the mirror is blocking the light path to them when it's flipped up).


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Old Dec 25, 2007, 11:56 AM   #8
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Merry Christmas to you too, and everyone else!!!! As for liveview and the 40D and 1d, If I'm not mistaken, it is most useful when remote shooting under computer control. Also, is nice if there is a small group to view instead of each person taking turns to look through the viewfinder. Also in awkward angles where it's difficult to see through the viewfinder but, can still view the screen. For stationary subjects, the autoficus button canbe used for focus and works quite well.

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Old Dec 25, 2007, 9:49 PM   #9
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Here's a deer shot I got at about 70 yards a few days ago from my Canon 100-400 @400mm.

http://flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

And here is a doe at 30 yards.

http://flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

I did get a few shots of deer at 200-250 yards, but they're pretty soft. Part of the problem I've seen is that deer move early and late...when there isn't a ton of light. Everythings a sacrifice, bump up iso to reduce blur, but you pick up grain. Pick up the shutter speed to reduce blur and shots go dark. Low ISO, low shutter speed, and you chance blur. Give and take all the way around. Even with really high dollar lenses. Its just with the really espensive lenses, you have a lot more to 'give' (usually aperature).

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