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Old Jun 11, 2008, 10:23 AM   #1
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hi

Considering the canon 450d as my 1st dSLR.

Has anyone seen any comparison pics anywhere comparing the results from say a standard kit lens with a good quality one. Hopefully showing the exact same pic from each or some test cards or something?

People say they are better but how noticable is it.


Thanks if anyone has some answers.


Si
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 11:00 AM   #2
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Here is one source of lens reviews. Just keep in mind that the results are not transferrable between camera models (some reviews are using higher resolution sensors with different characteristics compared to other reviews). But, they can give you a good idea of how most lens related issues compare (distortion, corner softness, and more).

http://www.photozone.de/reviews

Any lens choice is a compromise in one area or another (size, weight, focal range from wide to long, sharpness at various focal lengths and apertures, flare resistance, chromatic aberrations, distortion, color, contrast, etc.).

If you're new to a dSLR, you may want to stick with the basic kit lens for a while before going another route. That way, you'll get a better feel for the strengths and weaknesses of one, and can make better informed decisions later. For example, you may not want to lug around a heavier lens that's brighter for the types of shooting you do more often, or may not need a lens with more focal range, or may find the quality to be just fine at the printing/viewing sizes used more often, etc.


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Old Jun 11, 2008, 11:03 AM   #3
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The kit lens for the 450D is the Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS, which seems to be much improved over it's predecessor. (For example, see http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...ct/1114/cat/11 )

That is not to say that there aren't better choices for what you want to do. It's still just a kit lens, which means that it's a wide angle to moderate telephoto, and it's pretty dim. But as kit lenses go, it's a pretty good one.
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 11:27 AM   #4
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do you think the kit lens is worth £70 uk pounds because thats the difference in body or body+kit
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 11:49 AM   #5
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That looks like it only works out to around $137 (USD). It's unlikely you're going to find a better lens without spending a lot more than that, even without the built in stablization that lens has (assuming you're looking at the new 18-55mm with IS).

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Old Jun 11, 2008, 11:55 AM   #6
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For example, an inexpensive third party lens that's only a tiny bit brighter as you zoom in with a bit more focal range from wide to long like the Sigma 17-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DC is going to cost you a lot more (almost $400 U.S. here from online discounters), and it's not stablized like the Canon kit lens.

If you want a brighter zoom (for example, a lens that can maintain f/2.8 throughout it's focal range), then you're looking lenses that will cost you even more.

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Old Jun 11, 2008, 12:19 PM   #7
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thanks jim,

while im still a lens noob, can you recommend a good value and reasonable quality macro lens, one that will give me bigger and better results than my FZ30 pany.

I dont expect theres the 1 perfect lens, but one or two that are close would be great thanks, (just for me to look at)
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 12:36 PM   #8
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The Sigma 50mm f/2.8 EX DG Macro and Sigma 105mm EX DG Macro are popular choices. They also offer a 70mm f/2.8 Macro, 150mm f/2.8 Macro with HSM, and even a 180mm f/3.5 Macro with HSM. See the Macro lenses section on this page and select a lens for more detail.

http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_all.asp

The Tamron SP 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro is another popular choice.

http://www.tamron.com/lenses/prod/90mm.asp

These are all 1:1 (a.k.a., Lifesize) Macro lenses. That means they can fill the frame with a subject the same size as the film or sensor the lens is being used with at their closest focus distance.

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Old Jun 11, 2008, 12:53 PM   #9
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I moved your thread down to our Canon Lenses forum, where our Canon shooters may be able to give you some suggestions and pros and cons of some of the available Macro lenses.

Most kit lenses bundled with entry level dSLR models using APS-C size sensors have a maximum magnification of around 1:4 or 1:5 (able to fill the frame with a subject around 4 or 5 times the size of the camera's APS-C size sensor at their longest focal length and closest focus distance). Check the specs for a lens you're interested in and look for a maximum magnification section.

That may be just fine for many subjects. Some zoom lenses have 1:2 ability now (able to fill the frame with a subject twice as large as the film or sensor it's being used with. But, most Zoom lenses with the word Macro in their description are only 1:4

Just keep in mind that with a zoom the specs assume you're at the closest focus distance and the longest focal length (zoomed in all the way), and you may find the working distance is too far with a longer zoom, depending on what you're shooting). So, check the specs for info like the closest focus distance and maximum magnification rating of the lens (which will be at the longest focal length for a zoom).

If you want a 1:1 Macro lens, you're limited to primes (fixed focal length versus zoom lenses). You can find some workarounds if needed. For example, you can use extension tubes. That has some drawbacks though (light loss, loss of infinity focus when they're attached).

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Old Jun 11, 2008, 3:16 PM   #10
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In addition to the Sigma and Tamron lenses that JimC mentioned, Canon also has some of it's own. There's the 50mm f/2.5 for $250 (1:2 or 1.1 with the optional Life-Size Converter), the 60mm f/2.8 for $370 (1:1), the 100mm f/2.8 for $455(1:1), the 180mm f/3.5 for $1,300 (1:1), and if you're really serious, the 65mm f/2.8 1-5x for $865(1:1 to 5:1).
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