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Old Sep 3, 2008, 1:25 AM   #1
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I was just reading the review over at dpreview and he says that if you shoot at f/11 or smaller the lens looses quality, why is that? does that happen with all lenses?
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Old Sep 3, 2008, 1:35 AM   #2
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FYI: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...hotography.htm
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Old Sep 3, 2008, 2:42 AM   #3
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Yes with all lenses.
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Old Sep 3, 2008, 6:07 AM   #4
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Ok thanks, so for like landscapes what aperture would be suited best? something like f/11.
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Old Sep 3, 2008, 7:04 AM   #5
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hercules wrote:
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Ok thanks, so for like landscapes what aperture would be suited best? something like f/11.
There no fix criteria as it depends on what you shoot as the DOF is larger @17mm than @85mm so you wouldn't need to close down the aperture as much, but more importantly, this phenomenom varies with color: For example a blue sky is less susceptible to diffraction than a red sunset as its color wavelenght is shorter...

The sensor construction also plays a role: "Another complication is that bayer arrays allocate twice the fraction of pixels to green as red or blue light. This means that as the diffraction limit is approached, the first signs will be a loss of resolution in green and in pixel-level luminance. Blue light requires the smallest apertures (largest f-stop number) in order to reduce its resolution due to diffraction."
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