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Old Dec 14, 2008, 7:47 PM   #1
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For many years, I have always used a Hoya Skylight 1B filter as the standard protection device for my camera lenses. Now that I am thinking about finally making the switch to digital, is it safe or a good idea to use a Skylight 1B on EF-S lenses? Will it affect the color balance or performance of EF-S lenses in any way? Would I be better off using a clear UV filter instead?

Also, what type of polarizing filter is good to use with EF-S lenses?


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Old Dec 16, 2008, 9:53 PM   #2
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I don't use any filters to protect my lenses.

Generally I like the shot to be "as is", so I can apply whatever effects I need after the fact with software.
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Old Dec 17, 2008, 1:23 PM   #3
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I know there are two schools of thought on this matter, either against or in favor of using filters. While doing some railroad photography 20 years ago, a friend of mine who was standing next to me, had a rock fly up and hit his lens, severely damaging the front glass on it. He ended up replacing it with a new lens from Minolta.

Ever since then, I have been pro-protective filters for my lenses. Thankfully, it even paid off for me one day, as a chunk of coal hit and scratched my Skylight 1B while on a steam train excursion, but it saved the lens. I hate to think of replacing or repairing my lenses because of an accident like that.
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Old Dec 17, 2008, 1:35 PM   #4
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Back when I had much more expensive equipment than I do now, I took out general photography insurance.

It was about $300 per year back then, full replacement value with no deductibles.

I was insured against loss, theft, damage, dropping, etc. etc.

Perhaps consider general photography insurance. A filter isn't going to protect you from getting your gear stolen or dropping a lens or camera body.

Alternatively, if your in a situation where you think your lens could be damaged, then by all means use a filter.

I once had to photo a guy welding, and it was not pretty.
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