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Old Feb 28, 2009, 9:47 PM   #1
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Hi -

I am relatively new in this hobby.

I currently have a
Canon EOS Rebel XS Digital SLR Camera with the default 18-55mm IS Len... it is a great for a beginner like me.

I did some reading with the material that is included with my camera on macro photography. I have a burning question: well yes I am interested in small stuff like bugs and flowers and food and taking the pictures close-up... but can I really use a macro lens for ordinary object as well? Or that depends?

If so - what would be an ideal macro len for beginner? Say something not as much as half of what the camera itself costs me?

Thanks-

NN
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Old Mar 1, 2009, 6:36 AM   #2
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Macro lenses tend to focus slower than other lenses, so they may not be appropriate for sports/action/wildlife, but for other subjects a macro lens should do ok.

There are lots of ways to do macrophotography. One of wich (and the least expensive, btw) is to use close up lenses. These attach to the filter mounting ring of a lens you alreadyhave. This is not a very good option since even the best close up lenses will degrade image quality somewhat, but the 18-55 lens you've got is pretty sharp to start with, you might get satisfactory results with them.

Another is to use extension tubes. These are tubes that attach between a lens and the camera body. These are less convenient than close up lenses, but the don't add optical elements they produce good results when used with sharp lenses.

The last and most expensive is macro lenses. They are very sharp and have large apertures for work in low light. They are available in a variety of focal lengths. If you didn't want to frighten away whatever you were trying to shoot, you might want a longer lens so you could keep your distance. But if the subject were inatimate and well lit, you could use a shorter lens and get closer.

There really aren't any bad macro lenses, but selecting something inappropriate can be a costly mistake. You might want to browse the used market for something that is within your price range. http://www.keh.com is a good place to start.
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Old Mar 3, 2009, 1:48 PM   #3
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Thanks for your response - How would a telephoto lens with macro magnification ability differ from a macro lens? In term of mechanics and quality of pictures?

And I am having a hard time match up the right lens for my camera - is there anyway I can find the compatibility?

Sincerely,

NN
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Old Mar 3, 2009, 4:46 PM   #4
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namy77 wrote:
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Thanks for your response - How would a telephoto lens with macro magnification ability differ from a macro lens? In term of mechanics and quality of pictures?
'Macro'macrolenses will project an image on the sensor that is life size. That is 1:1 magnification. A subject that is 22.2mm across and 14.8mm highwill fill the entire frame. Some lenses that advertise a macro capability, may only have a magnification of 1:4 or 0.25X. This might be ok for large and medium size flowers or watches, but for insects or watch parts, this might not be sufficient.

A longer focal length will allow you to keep your distance.

Macro lenses tend to be sharper than non-macro lenses, and so will generally produce high quality images.

namy77 wrote:
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And I am having a hard time match up the right lens for my camera - is there anyway I can find the compatibility?
Any of Canon's macro lenses will fit your Canon XS, as will any of Sigma's and Tamron's.
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Old Mar 5, 2009, 3:53 PM   #5
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Just moved this to the Canon lens section as you were in the extra lenses for Point and Shoot. TCav has already given some good answers but other users might find the info helpful or want to chip in.
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