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Old Jun 30, 2009, 11:15 PM   #1
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Hello-

I am in the process of purchasing my first DSLR (going with the 500D), finally getting enough $$$ to move out of the Point and Shoots (though my S2 IS has served me well). Since I am ponying up for a SLR, it is only logical i spend humbly in my means to get a nice variety of lenses. Could someone please look over my choices real quick before I order these and make any recommendations/improvements you see fit. I can only afford what these lenses add up to. I am using my camera for traveling overseas, and want to be able to use it in a variety of settings along the way. I should also note that I'm only purchasing the body, not the 18-55mm kit lens that comes with it.

WALK AROUND LENS: Canon 28-135 IS USM (narrowly picked over the Canon EF 18-200, did i make the right choice???)

WIDE ANGLE LENS: Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM

50 Prime: Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II (figure the f/1.8 is a must, am I right?)

Thanks in advance

Last edited by My FeLung; Jun 30, 2009 at 11:20 PM.
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 2:12 AM   #2
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If you go with that setup you will not be making a mistake as such, and it may suit your style and needs just perfectly.

However, I would certainly not choose that set:

The 28-135 is okay, but it is the WRONG focal length range as a "walkaround" or "standard zoom" for a 1.6x crop camera.

It was designed to give a nice walk-around range on FF. The equivalent is 28-135 / 1.6 => 18-85.

It is also nowhere near as sharp as the 18-55 IS kit lens, which is incredible value for money. The first couple of iterations of the 18-55 before it got IS were not great and it got a poor reputation, but the IS version is a very good lens.

http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...ct/1114/cat/11

However you have chosen a decent super-wide zoom to go with the 28-135, so as long as you don't mind changing lenses (possibly a lot) it might be okay.

The nifty-fifty? On a crop? Well I may be just about the only person you will find to say that it was not something I liked at all. On the plus side it is very sharp on a crop camera even at f2. On the minus side is that it focusses very badly - slow, noisy and inaccurate. It is very cheaply built, so you might be unlucky with decentering in which case it won't even be sharp across the frame, and it gives a truly nasty rendering of OOF areas. But if you want a sharp short telephoto then it does the trick. It doesn't cost much and you can sell it for almost what you pay for it in the first place, so the downside to trying it out is limited.


I'm not a massive fan of superzooms, but if you can still change your mind and get the 18-200 instead of the 28-135 then I would suggest you do that. And then just stick with that one lens for a bit until you figure out what (if anything) it's not allowing you to do that you want to.

Many of the problems with the 18-200 can be easily and automatically corrected with DXO Optics, which I highly recommend if you are not using pro-grade lenses.
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 8:31 PM   #3
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Thanks for the kind reply peripatetic-

Ok, I've revised my list to two new setups:

1) a Canon 18-55 Kit lens and a Canon EF-s 55-250mm
or
2) a Sigma 18-200mm

How much of an IQ difference will I see between these two setups? I have read review after review that says you lose noticeably quality with such a wide range like the 18-200mm. I would prefer the convenience of having the one lens, but would rather switch them for superior quality

My next question is, will both of these setups in your opinion be wide enough at 18mm for some good landscape shots? Would it be worth it to add the Sigma 10-20mm to the mix for landscape shots?

Thanks again!

Last edited by My FeLung; Jul 1, 2009 at 8:33 PM.
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Old Jul 2, 2009, 1:54 AM   #4
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I would definitely go with #1 on the list above.

18mm (28mm equivalent) is the classic wide-angle and is certainly enough for landscape shots; this is not to say you might not want a super-wide later, but 18mm is certainly enough to get you started.

Don't forget that if you really really need something wider then you can stitch to create a panorama.

If you start with the 18-55 IS and 55-250 IS that will allow you to cover a wide range of focal lengths and allow you to make informed choices in future. Get those two lenses and take a ton of pictures. 6 months from now you will know what your next lens should be. :-)
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Old Jul 2, 2009, 9:57 AM   #5
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Excuse me if I'm wrong but....

isnt a 28-135mm lens effectively a 28-135 x 1.6 => 45-216mm on a dSLR?
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Old Jul 2, 2009, 11:03 AM   #6
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The actual focal length isn't changing. But, you can use multipliers to see how angle of view compares to the focal length you'd need to use on a 35mm camera to achieve the same angle of view (use 1.5x for Nikon, Sony and Pentax dSLR models with a Sony APS-C size sensor, or 1.6x for Canon models with a Canon APS-C size sensor). Depth of Field is another subject as you'll need to take the actual focal length into consideration. ;-)

The smaller the sensor or film size, the narrower your angle of view for a given focal length. The larger the sensor or film size, the wider your angle of view for a given focal length.

From an angle of view perspective, you'll have approximately the same angle of view using a 28-135mm lens on a Canon dSLR model with an APS-C size sensor that you would using a 45-216mm lens on a camera with a larger 35mm film or sensor size.

Also, keep in mind that Canon manufacturers dSLR models with several different sensor sizes. Entry level models use an APS-C size sensor (so use 1.6x to see what focal length you'd need on a camera with a 35mm film or sensor size for the same angle of view). Some Canon models have bit larger sensor, where you'd need to use a 1.3x multiplier to see how angle of view compares. Some Canon dSLR models have the same size sensor as 35mm film, so no multiplier is needed.
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Old Jul 4, 2009, 11:06 PM   #7
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Thanks guys for all the input-

Went with:
Camera: Canon Rebel t1i
Lenses: all Canons; 18-55mm IS, 55-250mm IS and a 50mm f/1.8
Batteries: 2 cheapo 2000mah Ebay batteries for $15 total + free shipping (worth a try)
Memory: 2 Transcend 16gb Class 6 cards
Accessories: Gorilla pod SLR Zoom and a Manfrotto 484
Pack: Lowepro Fastpack 200

Can't wait for it all to get here

Decided to hold off on the battery grip.... I'll see how I feel shooting vertical shots, also really wanted the 10-22mm, guess i'll make due with the 18x1.6 for now....
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Old Jul 5, 2009, 3:21 AM   #8
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Congratulations. Post some pics soon.
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Old Jul 9, 2009, 12:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelT1i View Post
Excuse me if I'm wrong but....

isnt a 28-135mm lens effectively a 28-135 x 1.6 => 45-216mm on a dSLR?
He was saying that in order for a 1.6x crop DSLR to have the same field of view as a FF 28-135mm lens, you would need to buy an 18-85mm lens instead.
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Old Aug 5, 2009, 7:39 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by My FeLung View Post
Thanks for the kind reply peripatetic-



1) a Canon 18-55 Kit lens and a Canon EF-s 55-250mm
or
2) a Sigma 18-200mm
This is the 2 combos I was thinking about. So most of you agree that 2 separate lenses are better than trying to get an all in one lens like option 2?


What makes the 50mm 1.8 so good is the DOF or does it actually take better pictures than the kit at 50mm?

Edit for clarity.

Last edited by elo; Aug 5, 2009 at 5:47 PM.
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