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Old May 19, 2010, 11:27 AM   #1
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Default 85mm lens

I'm thinking of buying the canon 85mm.
But i need to know what is the distance needed between me and the subject if I want an upper body shot\group shot.

Anyone? Thanks in advance

Ps: If there's a formula for caculating this, please let me know...
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Old May 19, 2010, 11:33 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishay View Post
...Ps: If there's a formula for caculating this, please let me know...
You'll find a focal length calculator on this page:

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...era-lenses.htm
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Old May 19, 2010, 12:26 PM   #3
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You have two Canon 85mm. lenses: f/1.2 and f/1.8.
This data is from Canon USA web site:

Canon 85mm. f/1.8 USM

Focal Length & Maximum Aperture
85mm 1:1.8

Lens Construction
9 elements in 7 groups

Diagonal Angle of View
28 30'

Focus Adjustment
Rear focusing system with USM

Closest Focusing Distance
0.85m / 2.8 ft

Filter Size
58mm

Max. Diameter x Length, Weight
3.0" x 2.8", 15.0 oz. / 75.0 x 71.5mm, 425g

Canon EF 85mm. f/1.2 II USM

Focal Length & Maximum Aperture
85mm 1:1.2

Lens Construction
8 elements in 7 groups

Diagonal Angle of View
2830'

Focus Adjustment
AF with full-time manual

Closest Focusing Distance
3.2 ft. / 0.95m

Filter Size
72mm

Max. Diameter x Length, Weight
3.6 in. x 3.3 in., 36.2 oz. / 91.5mm x 84mm, 1,025g (lens only)
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Old May 19, 2010, 4:02 PM   #4
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The 1.2 is L series lens, very very expensive
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Old May 19, 2010, 7:41 PM   #5
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Assuming you are using an APS-C camera rather than full frame then for a single person upper body shot you are looking at about 2.5 depending on your desired framing and for a group hard to say as depends on the size of the group, is that full length or just upper body too.

The link that JimC gave is the most helpful for you to work this out.

I use the 85mm f1.8 on both crop cameras and full frame and it is a great performer for the price.
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Old May 20, 2010, 12:27 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
I use the 85mm f1.8 on both crop cameras and full frame and it is a great performer for the price.

I just got this lens this week intending to use it for indoor sports - volleyball, badminton - on a 500D.

What is your experience with this lens for this type of application?

Thanks for your help.
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Old May 20, 2010, 12:33 AM   #7
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It is a very good lens for indoor action,. I do not shoot sports, but do shoot very low light indoor dancing, with this lens at times. And it does a very good job with the area of a basketball or volleyball court. With gym lighting, and bump you iso to 3200. You should be able to get some nice action shots with the ef 85mm.
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Old May 20, 2010, 1:08 AM   #8
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The 85L f1.2 has a very slow focussing speed compared to the f1.8 version as well as being heavier, larger, takes larger fillters and very much more expensive.

For general/sports shooting the f1.8 is a better bet, on FF also consider the 100mm f2 (a very much underrated lens) and the 135L f2 (one of the best lenses in Canon's lineup) with superb bokeh, and very fast focussing, and whilst not cheap is less than half the price of the 85L f1.2 MkII.

135L @ f2


135L @ f2


135L @ f2
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Old May 20, 2010, 1:13 AM   #9
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Yes the 135L is a beautiful lens. On a crop body it makes a good tele. The 100 f2 is a much under rated lens. Very very good for indoor action when you need some range like a large dance floor.
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Old May 20, 2010, 10:45 AM   #10
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first of - Ed, great shots. Really nice demonstration of what shallow dof can do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by a-beginner View Post
I just got this lens this week intending to use it for indoor sports - volleyball, badminton - on a 500D.

What is your experience with this lens for this type of application?

Thanks for your help.
The 85mm 1.8 is a fantastic lens for sports. I'm assuming that's what you got. As mentioned the 1.2 isn't as good because of the design of the focus on it.

My 85mm 1.8 is faster to focus than my 70-200 2.8L.

Now, having said that - the challenge with the 85mm 1.8 / 500d combination is with framing and distance. The 85mm lens is god for about 25 feet of distance and that's it. So you can't cover the full court and get quality results. On the flip side, on an aps-c camera, 85mm is awfully tight. Combine that with the 25 foot limitation and you end up with VERY tight framing and a lot of shots with partial body framing. So that takes getting used to. Framing is much easier with an APS-H or full frame sensor. But everything has it's pros and cons.
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