Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 25, 2010, 10:22 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
yohy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 120
Default Lens Aperture During HD Video (e.g., 60D)

When the 60D is shooting video, what sort of automatic and/or manual control does the shooter have over the lens aperture?
  • Is the aperture always wide open?
  • Do you have to set the aperture before beginning to record?
  • Can you adjust during recording, so that DOF/light sensitivity change during filming?
  • Does the camera adjust the aperture automatically, but you cannot manually affect it at all? Does it adjust automatically, but you can also adjust it manually?
  • Do the answers to these questions depend on which lens is on the camera? If so, how?
I have the same question about ISO -- can you adjust this during filming?

(I am considering changing from the 40D to the 60D, and buying a couple lenses in the process.)
yohy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 26, 2010, 3:20 AM   #2
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

A quick google found the manual http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/9/030000...s60d-im-en.pdf so go to page 171 onwards for movie info.

To quickly answer though (from experience with my 5DmkII, 7D and T1i), if you are in auto the aperture will rarely be wide open but rather stopped down to get a shutter speed of about 1/60s. You can choose to shoot auto or manual. Not sure if you can adjust during recording but guess so as I can on the options I have. Aperture/shutter speed/iso can all be done as auto or you can set them manually with the option of ISO as manual or auto which gives a semi auto effect with the ISO changing to maintain what the camera thinks is the correct exposure. The lens won't affect the camera in the features but will affect the max/min aperture that can be chosen.

If you are only buying the 60D for the movie side then think about what sort of movie you are wanting to shoot as things are not so easy as using a dedicated movie cam or even a point and shoot/bridge/superzoom for movie due to the AF side.
__________________
[SIZE=1][SIZE=2]Any problems with a post or thread please use the report button at the bottom left of the post and the team will help sort it out.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 26, 2010, 1:06 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
yohy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 120
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
A quick google found the manual http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/9/030000...s60d-im-en.pdf so go to page 171 onwards for movie info.

To quickly answer though (from experience with my 5DmkII, 7D and T1i), if you are in auto the aperture will rarely be wide open but rather stopped down to get a shutter speed of about 1/60s. You can choose to shoot auto or manual. Not sure if you can adjust during recording but guess so as I can on the options I have. Aperture/shutter speed/iso can all be done as auto or you can set them manually with the option of ISO as manual or auto which gives a semi auto effect with the ISO changing to maintain what the camera thinks is the correct exposure. The lens won't affect the camera in the features but will affect the max/min aperture that can be chosen.

If you are only buying the 60D for the movie side then think about what sort of movie you are wanting to shoot as things are not so easy as using a dedicated movie cam or even a point and shoot/bridge/superzoom for movie due to the AF side.
I'm also thinking about the 60D for ISO.

What do you mean "the AF side"? What about the AF poses a problem?
yohy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 26, 2010, 1:43 PM   #4
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

That you can't AF during video with good results. Sony have this sorted if you really want to shoot video more than stills. I don't find it an issue for normal things, just a new way of shooting.
__________________
[SIZE=1][SIZE=2]Any problems with a post or thread please use the report button at the bottom left of the post and the team will help sort it out.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 26, 2010, 3:41 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
yohy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 120
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
That you can't AF during video with good results. Sony have this sorted if you really want to shoot video more than stills. I don't find it an issue for normal things, just a new way of shooting.
Didn't they shoot a whole episode of House with the 5DII?
yohy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 26, 2010, 3:49 PM   #6
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yohy View Post
Didn't they shoot a whole episode of House with the 5DII?
They sure did but like a lot of pro video gear it was shot using manual focus. There are some great rigs to assist in accurate focus for serious use but that's better for planned shooting.
__________________
[SIZE=1][SIZE=2]Any problems with a post or thread please use the report button at the bottom left of the post and the team will help sort it out.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 8, 2010, 7:18 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
yohy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 120
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
They sure did but like a lot of pro video gear it was shot using manual focus. There are some great rigs to assist in accurate focus for serious use but that's better for planned shooting.
I guess most of the time, you stop down enough when shooting video so that focus is less of an issue?
yohy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 8, 2010, 7:51 PM   #8
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

It depends on the look you are going for. I took this last year at Christmas with the Canon 50mm f1.8 on the 5DmkII. It was at f2 I believe as I wanted the shallow DOF. If you can work with it then it looks a lot more professional. This is not something I'm saying about what I shot as it is not all that smooth being handheld and pretty cold. Be sure to watch it in HD for the best results.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bb6pr..._order&list=UL

Here is one from a few days later, the close shots are again the 5DmkII with a Sigma 120-300mm f2.8 lens. You could never get this sort of depth of field without having the larger sensor (well, not true, you can adapt a DV cam but that's another story).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l20Gs...st=UL&index=11
__________________
[SIZE=1][SIZE=2]Any problems with a post or thread please use the report button at the bottom left of the post and the team will help sort it out.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 8, 2010, 8:06 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
yohy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 120
Default

Interesting. I like some of those shallow DOF effects. Makes me want to get the Sigma 30 1.4 instead of the Canon 28 1.8....

yohy
yohy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 8, 2010, 8:15 PM   #10
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

The Sigma would be my choice if getting a lens in that range, can give some lovely results.
__________________
[SIZE=1][SIZE=2]Any problems with a post or thread please use the report button at the bottom left of the post and the team will help sort it out.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 AM.