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Old Dec 16, 2010, 5:57 PM   #1
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Default Hi, is there a lens that could double as macro and portraiture?

As the post suggests is there a lens that could manage both? I am new to Dslrs, just got a t2i.
Looking to spend less than $400.
Or should i just get the "niffty fifty" and something else fo the macros?

Thanks

Marķa
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Old Dec 16, 2010, 6:13 PM   #2
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Any macro lens would be great for portraits. In fact, if macro lenses have a fault, it's that they're too sharp for portraits. (Sometimes, you don't want every pore, facial hair, and blemish showing up in a portrait.) Anything from Canon's 60/2.8 and Tamron's 60/2.0 through Sigma's 70/2.8 to Tamron's 90/2.8, would do well. And if you've got room to back up (or you want to shot what looks like a passport photo) you can go with Canon's or Tokina's 100/2.8 or Sigma's 105/2.8.

The 50/1.8 is a little too short for head & shoulders portraits, but it works well for couples portraits and environmental portraits.
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Old Dec 16, 2010, 7:08 PM   #3
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Tcav thank you. I've seen somewhere mentioned a sort of macro adapter? 500D??? What is that? Is it good? Where can i find it i have searched in adorama and bh lenses.
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Old Dec 16, 2010, 8:48 PM   #4
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hello
prime lenses are usually sharper and have better quality than zoom lenses, although many zooms in the right hands are unbeatable
prime lenses do cost more
tamron 90mm 350-450
canon 100mm 500-600
figure out the space in which you will use lens, if indoors and in a tight space the 85-105mm range is too tight, outdoors its fabulous as also in a studio setting
macro is different coz its close up and the canon is really very good
keep in mind 3rd party lenses may not work on next generation camera bodies coz they are reverse engineered, most people have not had that problem but it is a situation you could run into
before you jump in play around with your kit lens, assuming you have the 18-55mm IS, its not as bad as people think it is,
if your new to the dslr world, dont jump into cheaper glass ( i have done just this ) coz the lens will outlive the camera.
eventually what you really want is a family of lenses that you will actively
learn good camera habits and photography skills and buy a flash and tripod before you jump into a lens
thats my 2 cents
good luck
merry xmas
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Old Dec 16, 2010, 10:18 PM   #5
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I have being playing around with both kit lenses, and think 50 o 60 mm would probably fit most of my needs, although i do feel for some instances i would need a longer lens. Any flash to recommend? One not to heavy or expensive, that gets the Job done?

Many thanks and merry Christmas
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 7:39 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deterpawson View Post
... keep in mind 3rd party lenses may not work on next generation camera bodies coz they are reverse engineered, most people have not had that problem but it is a situation you could run into ...
Only Sigma reverse engineers their mounts, and when they identify a compatibility problem with newer bodies, they fix it free.
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Old Dec 17, 2010, 7:42 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marubex View Post
I have being playing around with both kit lenses, and think 50 o 60 mm would probably fit most of my needs ...
If your subject is animate (insects, small animals) then, with a 50mm or 60mm focal length lens, you may have to get close enough to frighten away your subject.
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Old Dec 18, 2010, 9:33 AM   #8
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I see a lot of folks using the Canon 100 2.8 Macro for both macro and potraits, personally I find it a bit long for potraits. When I was playing in the Macro world I found longer=better. As stated above you may need to get so close that whatever you are trying to shoot will scurry off. I didnt try using one lens for both applications but focused on a good Macro lens. The Canon 180L Macro is the best Macro lens I used but pricey and not very fast in the AF dept, not that anyone should depend on AF for macro work anyhow. I tried the 100 2.8 but it seemed to fall short.
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Old Dec 18, 2010, 9:45 AM   #9
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That Canon lens, the 100mm f2.8 Macro, is the one I intend to get soon. I've been looking for a lens that will do good macro and be useful for other things, and for me this is it. The 100mm is about right for portraiture on my FF camera. Minimum focussing distance is about a foot which should obviate any lighting issues when using it for macro.

I used to use a Tamron SP 70-210 lens that focussed smoothly down to 1:2. That was an extremely useful lens - a great shame no-one seems to make anything like it nowadays. The current Tamron 70-300, the cheaper non-stabilised one (there are two), does have a macro range giving 1:2, but it doesn't focus smoothly down to it - you have to throw a "macro" switch. Still, it's very cheap and quite tempting anyway.
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Old Dec 20, 2010, 12:18 AM   #10
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I picked up a Canon EF 60mm F2.8 macro for under $400USD on sale from B&H Photo. I think you said your budget was $400. It has real time manual focus which I find very handy compared to my nifty fifty.
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