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Old Dec 15, 2011, 2:24 PM   #1
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Default 50d lens for room pics to sell house

Trying to sell my house and need interior room pictures. Also would like to take family gathering pictures without leaving someone out. The kit lense I have, 18-135, isn't able to do this. Advice please?
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Old Dec 15, 2011, 3:10 PM   #2
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There are a number of good choices for wide angle. Links to threads on this topic -

http://forums.steves-digicams.com//s...d.php?t=184072

http://forums.steves-digicams.com//s...d.php?t=190199

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Old Dec 15, 2011, 3:37 PM   #3
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Default 15-85 vs. 17-55?

Thank you Kelly for the links. Would either be wide enough for my purposes?
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Old Dec 15, 2011, 9:09 PM   #4
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I have the 10-20 Sigma. In my view 10mm is insanely wide. But I find that I do use that setting (to my surprise). For your purposes I expect that 12 or 14mm would be wide enough. It would be ideal if there were a 14-70 (just throwing out numbers) to act as an alternate zoom to the 18-135 you already have. But no such luck. The zooms that get down to 14mm or wider are true WA zooms, do not try to cover the longer focal lengths. So, in my view, it would make more sense for you to get a WA zoom. These are typically "only" 2X zoom range. A number of them are discussed in those threads I linked to.

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Old Dec 16, 2011, 11:21 AM   #5
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My vote is the sigma 10-20 as well. I have it and I do use it when I am shooting indoors of rooms as it does capture pretty much all that I want. Many real estate agents use something along this focal length. The 10-20 is cheaper than the Canon. If you can rent it from a camera shop (rather than buy it for 500 and never use it again) you'd probably be a head of the game. Canon's focal length for this is 10-22.
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Old Jan 2, 2012, 9:56 PM   #6
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I would also recommend an ultra wide angle for interior room photos. 10mm on a crop (APS-C) body does a good job.

Some years ago I considered an ultra-wide angle. The Sigma 10-20mm was just over half the price of the Canon 10-20mm back then. I have a sharp copy of the Sigma 10-20mm. Nowadays there is also the Sigma 8-16mm

Having said that, the Canon 15-85mm lens (as you outlined in your original post) would be preferred over the Canon 17-55mm for it's wider angle (though the 17-55mm has f2.8). Use a tripod to get steady shots - and often you can take them from a different (eg low / high perspectives) for different compositions. Just remember with ultra-wides, to take photos with the camera horizontal, otherwise things get more distorted.

All the best.

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Old Jan 3, 2012, 8:45 AM   #7
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The quality of ultra-wide lenses correlates very closely to price. The Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 has a lot of CA and distortion at the wide end, but better lenses cost a lot more.

The CA won't affect you very much when shooting indoors (as long as the light coming in windows isn't very bright), but the distortion at 10mm can cause your walls and ceiling to look crooked. It also vignettes a lot. While CA and distortion can be corrected in post-processing, correcting distortion causes loss of detail in the corners that are already not too sharp.

Since you're looking for a lens to do one thing, I'd go with the Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6, shoot at f/8 or f/11 to avoid the vignetting, and stay away from 10mm to avoid the worst of the distortion and CA.

Or, even better, rent a better lens.
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Old Jan 3, 2012, 11:53 AM   #8
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Lab tests may reveal vignetting on the Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6, but for practical purposes, I don't see that -



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Old Jan 3, 2012, 3:34 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KCook View Post
Lab tests may reveal vignetting on the Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6, but for practical purposes, I don't see that
At f/11 it isn't too bad.
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