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Old Feb 19, 2013, 2:29 PM   #1
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Default Newbie ? about 50mm lens

I have a Canon Rebel T3i and early on I purchased an EF 50 mm f/1.8 ii lens for it. I have no idea why. I do not know when I should use it. Someone told me "low-light conditions," but I get great results with the regular lens, using AV setting that works for me (no flash), for photos inside my house...

I'm sure I was convinced I needed it at the time, and if I recall, I thought I would use it for photos of my craft projects, for my blog. I have a friend whose blog posts with her art projects, look fabulous. I asked her what she shoots with--she said, "It is a Canon Compact Macro Lens EF 50mm. My camera is a DSLR Rebel Xsi." My question is two-fold: Am I correct that her lens is not at all the same as mine? (I do not see the words "compact" or "macro" on my lens box.) How can I best use the 50mm I own?

Please note I refer to myself as a newbie because I understand my questions reflect a level of ignorance that is incredible to most people on this group. I have never minded being considered ignorant if it results in my gaining some much-needed information. So, thanks for patience.
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Old Feb 19, 2013, 3:20 PM   #2
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The 50mm f/1.8 II is not a macro. With the 1.6 cropped factor, it is equivalent to 80mm (1.6x50). This is a good lens for the money and is good for low light indoors without using a flash and great for taking portraits.
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Old Feb 19, 2013, 4:05 PM   #3
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Thanks for the explanation. I wondered about the "macro" because the lens has a little flower on the side of it. Sorry I don't know what you mean with "the 1.6 cropped factor"...
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Old Feb 19, 2013, 5:47 PM   #4
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The is a 50mm macro. It is not very popular bet does a decent macro at 1:2. The 50 2.5
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Old Feb 19, 2013, 9:11 PM   #5
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You can use the EF 50mm F1.8 for shallow depth of field type shots.

I use extension tubes with my EF 50mm F1.8 II in order to focus closer.
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Old Feb 20, 2013, 12:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
The is a 50mm macro. It is not very popular bet does a decent macro at 1:2. The 50 2.8
I would not call the EF-S 50mm f/1.8 II as a macro lens. As far as I know the magnification factor of this lens is 1:6.6 not 1:2. A classic macro lens is 1:1 or 1:2. Anything greater than 1:2, you are stretching it by calling this lens a macro. I have this lens too and I know what it can't do. I don't use it for macro shots. The EF-S 60mm f/2.8, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro are macro lenses. However, if you add extension tubes to it, that is another story.
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Canon EOS T3i, 7D and 70D EF 17-40mm f/4L, EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6, Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM, 430 EXII Flash.
Sony A200, SLT-A58 System with HVL-F42AM Flash.
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Old Feb 20, 2013, 12:26 AM   #7
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Default What is crop factor?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkford View Post
Thanks for the explanation. I wondered about the "macro" because the lens has a little flower on the side of it. Sorry I don't know what you mean with "the 1.6 cropped factor"...
From Wikipedia:

The terms crop factor and focal length multiplier were coined in recent years in an attempt to help 35 mm film format SLR photographers understand how their existing ranges of lenses would perform on newly introduced DSLR cameras which had sensors smaller than the 35 mm film format, but often utilized existing 35 mm film format SLR lens mounts. Using an FLM of 1.5, for example, a photographer might say that a 50 mm lens on his DSLR "acts like" its focal length has been multiplied by 1.5, by which he means that it has the same field of view as a 75 mm lens on the film camera that he is more familiar with. Of course, the actual focal length of a photographic lens is fixed by its optical construction, and does not change with the format of the sensor that is put behind it.
Most DSLRs on the market have nominally APS-C-sized image sensors, smaller than the standard 36 24 mm (35 mm) film frame. For example, many Canon DSLRs use an APS-C sensor that measures 22.2 mm 14.8 mm. The result is that the image sensor captures image data from a smaller area than a 35 mm film SLR camera would, effectively cropping out the corners and sides that would be captured by the 36 mm 24 mm 'full-size' film frame.
Because of this crop, the effective field of view (FOV) is reduced by a factor proportional to the ratio between the smaller sensor size and the 35 mm film format (reference) size.
For most DSLR cameras, this factor is 1.32.0. For example, a 28 mm lens delivers a moderately wide-angle FOV on a 35 mm format full-frame camera, but on a camera with a 1.6 crop factor, an image made with the same lens will have the same field of view that a full-frame camera would make with a ~45 mm lens (28 1.6 = 44.8). This narrowing of the FOV is a disadvantage to photographers when a wide FOV is desired. Ultra-wide lens designs become merely wide; wide-angle lenses become 'normal'. However, the crop factor can be an advantage to photographers when a narrow FOV is desired. It allows photographers with long-focal-length lenses to fill the frame more easily when the subject is far away. A 300 mm lens on a camera with a 1.6 crop factor delivers images with the same FOV that a 35 mm film format camera would require a 480 mm long focus lens to capture.
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Canon EOS T3i, 7D and 70D EF 17-40mm f/4L, EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6, Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM, 430 EXII Flash.
Sony A200, SLT-A58 System with HVL-F42AM Flash.
Mirrorless APS-C camera: Samsung NX100, Canon EOS-M.
M4/3 systems: Olympus OM-D-E-M5 and Panasonic DMC-G3.
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Old Feb 20, 2013, 4:44 AM   #8
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This lens is 50 2.5 macro.

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...ns-Review.aspx
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Old Feb 20, 2013, 9:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
The 50mm f/2.5 is a viable choice for macro but what is she going to do with another 50mm lens?

By the way, sorry about the mix-up!
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Canon EOS T3i, 7D and 70D EF 17-40mm f/4L, EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6, Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM, 430 EXII Flash.
Sony A200, SLT-A58 System with HVL-F42AM Flash.
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Old Feb 21, 2013, 3:41 AM   #10
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It is actually a decent lens for non macro shots if you compare it with the 50 1.8. Both do not focus really fast. At equal f-stops they 2.5 has a little better image quality. And you have the macro ability. Both can produce nice shallow dof for portraits, the 1.8 has as 2/3 stop advantage in low light. But it is about 150 dollar more then the 50 1.8.

Then there is the 50 2.8 macro form sigma, which is 400 dollar for macro.
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