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Old Aug 26, 2002, 9:23 PM   #1
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Default Advice on another lens for D60

Please give an opinion. I've tried to use the link Steve provided to SLR lenses, but it always has too much traffic to let me on. I've read the review comparing the 16-35 mm to the 17-35.

Currently I have the 28-135mm. Please go to http://www.pbase.com/barbados to see the style of photos I do. I like to do portraits with blurred background and shallow dof or macros with short focal distance but everything stays sharp. But I also do landscape with max dof. I thought the 16-35mm lens would be good for getting up closer for macro shots, but maybe instead longer zoom lens would be better for this? I don't want to use flash or tripod. Could you more experienced photogs out their advise on which lens?
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Old Aug 28, 2002, 4:39 AM   #2
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Default d60 lens reply

hi barbados, from every thing you said your looking for a lens to do , i think the perfect lens would be the canon ef 28-70mm 2.8 L
i have a d60 also as well as the 28-70 L its just awsome for portraits, its closest focus is 1.6ft. its extremely sharp for a zoom, comparable to single focal length lenses, im starting to sound like a canon ad aint i? :-) serious though this lens is sweet, it will be a perfect match for them 6.3 million pixels, it costs around $ 1000.00 to $1150.00 but being you already have the 28-135mm you already have them focal lengths covered , but if your looking for a portrait/ general use zoom thats extremely sharp/fast apeture/shallow dof, this lens is a good choice,
my regards thomas

[Edited on 8-28-2002 by thomas mcconville]
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Old Aug 28, 2002, 7:18 AM   #3
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Default another lens to add plus the 28-135mm

I am looking for a lens in addition to the 28-135mm. I appreciate your input about the 28-70mm and while it may add some capabilities the 28-135mm doesn't offer, as you point out, it covering focal lengths I already have covered.

What do people who have the 16-28mm tend to photograph? Landscapes?
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Old Sep 1, 2002, 11:36 AM   #4
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Hi Barbados,

OK, it sounds like you are looking for some brainstorming for lens ideas. Here are some thoughts:

1) If you get the 50mm 1.4 lens, you will have a lens which is a couple stops faster than what you now have. (Just something to think about.)

2) 100mm 1:1 macro. I took a look at some of your photos (very nice), and am guessing that you might kind of have fun with a macro lens.

3) The 70-300mm IS is another option.

I have the 28-135mm IS and 70-300 IS. The focal length overlap is nice, as it keeps you from having to switch lenses a lot when you are near the "borderline" in focal length preference.

Judd
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Old Sep 1, 2002, 5:04 PM   #5
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Default 70-300mm

Thanks for your info Judd. Can you hand hold the 70-300mm or do you need a tripod? Do you need an external flash? These would be additions that would make it too cumbersome for me as I put the camera around my neck and go, with a minimum of fuss, bulk or gear. I was thinking that the 16-35mm might be fun for architectural details and landscapes. I also want to do macros and candid portraits, so at least for overseas travelling, to limit it to two lenses, I probably need a second zoom to go with the28-135mm, The question is which one. Having peoples opinions really helps.
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Old Sep 1, 2002, 6:47 PM   #6
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Hi Barbados,

Since the 70-300mm lens I am suggesting is an Image Stabilized lens, like your 28-135mm IS, it shouldn't be a problem using it without a tripod in most shooting situations. This lens seems to be a reasonable size and weight, but is larger than the 28-135mm, IS.

I seldom use flash, but if I did, I am sure the 70-300mm IS could NOT be used with the internal flash.

OK, you seem to be interested in others' opinions, so here are a couple of more things you might want to think about:

1) The "wide" end of your current lens is about 45mm in 35mm equiv. This isn't terribly wide. BUT, if you replace your D60 in a few years, it is likely that it's Canon replacement will have a full size imager. This means that your existing 28-135mm really WILL be a 28mm wide end.

2) My plan is to use my Coolpix 995 for things like travel, and use the D60 for times when I am going out for the specific purpose of taking pictures. If I did take my D60 with me on a trip, I would probably try to stick with ONE lens, not two... and that lens would be my 28-135 IS.

3) People's photographic styles vary a lot, so it is hard for anybody to make specific recommendations on a lens, but ask yourself a question. When you are out shooting with your 28-135, in what way do you feel the most limited? Do you find yourself frequently at the "135mm end" of your lens, wishing you could reach out farther? ...or do you more often find yourself at the "wide" end of your lens, frustrated that you can't go wider. I have been doing railroad photography lately. In that application, nothing seems better to me than a nice telephoto for those dramatic headon shots. For many styles of photography, however, the "compression" of a telephoto would not be flattering to the subject matter. You might want to just stick with what you have until you feel limited with your current lens.

Also, how do you use your photographs? If they are purely for web use, or applications that don't require all the resolution of the D60, you can always do a "poor man's" telephoto... crop and use only the center of the image. You can't really do that on the wide end (Hmmm, though with still subjects I guess you can always stitch together a couple of different images.

I really do enjoy your photographic style. You have a good sense of composition and lighting. You seem to have a good understanding of the importance of keeping distracting features out of your shots, allowing your eye to concentrate on the important part of the photograph.

Anyway, good luck with the lens decision.

Judd
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Old Sep 1, 2002, 8:44 PM   #7
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Default Good suggestions

Thanks Judd. I like the suggestion to use the camera with the current 28-135mm lens and get an idea for where it feels limiting. If I had to choose today, I'd probably go for the 70-300 IS lens. I will take the D60 travelling 'cause it's my only digital camera and the 1 Gb microdrive lets me shoot 415 large/fine photos before I have to empty the drive into a MindStor. Next trip is Thailand, Laos and Angkor Wat, Cambodia in Jan '03. The 28-135mm comes along for sure. maybe one other lens too. When I travel, I take a lot of candid portraits in available light, macros of food in markets abstracts and some landscapes.

BTW, Your photos are wonderful. I like the abstract of the wheel, and the working locomotive with the interesting hot air distortion above it. I like how you've photographed around the theme of railways, and become interested in the historical aspects of the subject.
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Old Sep 6, 2002, 5:50 AM   #8
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Default Sigma?

For the wide angle side the Sigma 15-30mm is an affordable lens. Having this lens for about 2 weeks now I can not imagine how I could have lived without it before. This DOF is realy amazing.
tc
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Old Sep 9, 2002, 7:41 PM   #9
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Default EF 100-400 IS, plus extension tubes!

Hi,

I looked at your website. You have a very broad range of interests, and a wide variety of shooting styles. However, you do seem to like telephoto shots, as well as closeups. I have the 28-135, which you use very well. My favorite lens is the 100- 400, which I use at airshows, zoos, looking at architeture (tops of buiildings

, etc), birds. It is a very sharp lens for a big zoom, with great contrast.

But the surprise is how well it works for MACRO, with 65mm of extension tubes attached. Handheld, too, because of the IS!

Check this out:


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Old Sep 16, 2002, 7:23 PM   #10
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Default Great photo Walter

Wow, I love the sharpness of detail on the bug's eyes and wings.And the detail on the leaf. What are extension tubes for macros? I've never used one.
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