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Old Sep 3, 2018, 5:24 PM   #1
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Default Canon Macro Lens

I have a Canon EOS Rebel T6. Can you recommend a good macro lens for it?

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Old Sep 4, 2018, 9:29 PM   #2
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The macro lens will depend on what you want to shoot...
i.e. flowers, insects or coins

What will you be shooting?
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Old Sep 9, 2018, 11:48 PM   #3
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I like shooting insects and flowers . . . . .

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Old Sep 10, 2018, 6:15 AM   #4
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I like shooting insects and flowers .
Flowers are very cooperative, so you can use any macro lens. Insects can be skittish so you may need a longer lens to avoid frightening them away. Something from 85 mm to 135 mm should be good for that.

BTW, macro lenses are capable of magnification ratios of 1:2 or better. That means the image of the subject projected onto the image4 sensor will be half size or larger. Most macro lenses can actually achieve a 1:1 magnification, which means that a quarter will fill the image from edge to edge. If that's actually more than you need, there are lots of general purpose lenses that are advertised as "macro" lenses, even though they are capable of magnification ratios of only 1:4. If you don't need 1:1 or even 1:2, perhaps one of these other lenses might suit you. Sigma's 17-70/2.8-4 is a nice alternative to the 18-55 kit lens, in that it has a greater zoom range and a larger maximum aperture, plus it has a magnification ratio of 1:2.8, which would make it capable of the type of macrophotography you provided in your sample photo.
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Old Sep 10, 2018, 11:10 AM   #5
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I currently have the canon efs 18-55mm lens and I'm not getting as close as I would like to. I'm assuming you saw my caterpillar image in the critique forum -- not a nice sharp image (which could also be operator error being a newbie in addition to not the best equipment). Is there a lens you could recommend for that shooting situation?
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Old Sep 10, 2018, 7:08 PM   #6
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I currently have the canon efs 18-55mm lens and I'm not getting as close as I would like to.
Extension tubes would help with that, and without introducing another optical element of questionable parentage.

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Is there a lens you could recommend for that shooting situation?
There are lots of good macro lenses. As I've said before, there are no bad macro lenses.

If you don't need 1:1 or even 1:2 magnification, there are plenty of general purpose lenses that that offer a "macro" capability with magnification ratios of 1:2.8 like the Sigma 17-70/2.8-4 that I mentioned in another post. It's quite good, faster than the 18-55, and it can get closer than the 18-55. It and other macro lenses are available for rent at LensRentals.com, so you can try them before you buy them.

I have the Sigma 70mm f/2.8 Macro lens that I got used, and have been very pleased with the results, but you might like something longer if you do most of your macro work in the wild.
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Old Sep 11, 2018, 9:10 AM   #7
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It and other macro lenses are available for rent at LensRentals.com, so you can try them before you buy them.
What? I did not know you could rent a lens! Well, let me do my research and pick one to check out. Thank you for your help to help me make an educated decision!
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Old Sep 17, 2018, 1:28 PM   #8
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If your main interest is flowers/plants in your own garden or in nature, consider a short macro lens like 40mm (rough equivalent to 60mm in FF). You'll need or want to get close and won't do a lot at full 1:1. It also works well for tabletop flowers and bouquets. You don't have to move a lot to frame a small shrub or a daisy. You can use it for all sorts of nature photography if you hike and easy to use with a TTL speedlite.

If you need distance like in a formal display or arboretum where you can't get close, then consider the longer focal length lenses. You won't be able to get close.

A macro lens isn't like zoom. You have to move closer or farther away to get the image size. I like getting "close" to flowers. I'm usually well within arm's reach. I have no interest at all in insects.
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Old Sep 17, 2018, 10:36 PM   #9
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I like shooting insects and flowers . . . . .
All great comments so far
For insects however you might want to look @ some longer lenses like 150 mm or above

-> Reason being you want be at a further working distance plus you don't want to scare the insects (may be butterflies) to fly away by getting too close... Also the lighting will be easier as you don't 'shadow' your subjects and also you'll have enough room for the flash lighting - Trust me you'll need it as you'll have to close the aperture down for the greater DOF (as with all macro lenses the focusing plane is super thin)
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