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Old May 13, 2004, 6:03 AM   #11
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Several posters here, including myself have the Sigma 70-200 f/2.8. It's an excellent lens and the Sigma 1.4x TC is matched to their lens so it might work out even better for you on both the performance and $ front... BTW all the EX series lens like this 70-200 f/2.8 are HSM meaning they have the Ultrasonic focusing which is both very fast and quiet with full-time manual overide!

http://www.naturephotographers.net/mg0600-1.html
http://www.photozone.de/2Equipment/easytxt.htm#Ztelef
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...31&forum_id=65
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Old May 13, 2004, 8:32 AM   #12
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Graeme Shiomi wrote:
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Wow...lots to consider. Probably the #1 thing that really peaked my interest was when NHL said:
"A long zoom is mostly used to bring in action shots and for that IS is not very helpful (ie IS does not overcome subject movements). What you need is faster lens with larger aperture when nature is not in your favour..."


While it is true that IS is not helpful in overcoming subject movement, do not underestimate the value of IS shooting moving subjects. The newer IS found on the 70-200mm f/2.8 L lens is very effective for reducing camera shake while handholding the camera with the longer lens attached. As your lenses get longer, weight increases and not only increase magnification, but increase the effect of any camera shake. Granted, you can't take shots of action at 1/20sec and expect the action to stop, but you WILL take better pictures at 1/250 with IS than you will without. Even when taking pictures of moving subjects, you still have camera movement. The newer IS also recognizes when it is on a tripod and can help overcome any instability vibrations in your tripod.

I'm not diminishing the quality of many non-IS lenses out there, as there are many excellent choices. All I am pointing out is that to dismiss IS because it doesn't help action shots is an incorrect and invalid argument.
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Old May 13, 2004, 10:56 AM   #13
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Just some facts: 1/250s = 4ms --> very tight and tought to close the loop, especially for a mechanical control system... :idea:
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Old May 13, 2004, 1:43 PM   #14
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NHL wrote:
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Just some facts: 1/250s = 4ms --> very tight and tought to close the loop, especially for a mechanical control system... :idea:
True, but the IS takes effect during the half-depress of the shutter so it is actuated before the shutter actually moves anyway. I'm no design expert and can't explain how it works, but I know it does :-)
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Old May 13, 2004, 3:28 PM   #15
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I like my IS lens, Canon 28-135mm USM IS, and I know that the IS is not a cure all. There are times when I turn the IS off when shooting. However, I have the option to turn the IS on at anytime.
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Old May 14, 2004, 1:27 AM   #16
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ohenry wrote:
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True, but the IS takes effect during the half-depress of the shutter so it is actuated before the shutter actually moves anyway. I'm no design expert and can't explain how it works, but I know it does :-)
... and I agree how it works, but is it relevant though? With common logic one would imagine what's only critical is the movement that the camera detects (and corrects for) between the slit of the 1st shutter curtain opening and the 2nd shutter curtain closing that is captured (ie the 4ms interval) and processed into images by the camera. Isn't the sensor blind before and after the shutter's curtains releases hence impervious to any motion during thoses times anyway and not part of the picture?

My point is still valid with lower shutter speed (ie with more time to process) IS is very effective at capturing static structures or non-moving subjects, but as the shutter speed increases a requirement to stop any subject action:
1. You're running into the frequency response limit of the system.
2. The fast freezing action of the higher shutter in itself renders IS redundant.
:?:


Of course having IS is better than without IS, but one has to factor in its cost (and there's also the extra battery drain...) vs its benefit (or lack off). I have the 28-135mm USM IS too!

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Old May 14, 2004, 7:57 AM   #17
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Regarding IS, the only IS telephoto zoom lens I can afford is the 75-300 IS USM. So with that in mind, based upon what I've read here (and on sites listing lens details), I'd be better off forgoing the IS to get into the 70-200 F4L or 70-200 F2.8 EX with the appropriate TC.

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Old May 14, 2004, 1:43 PM   #18
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Graeme Shiomi wrote:
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Regarding IS, the only IS telephoto zoom lens I can afford is the 75-300 IS USM. So with that in mind, based upon what I've read here (and on sites listing lens details), I'd be better off forgoing the IS to get into the 70-200 F4L or 70-200 F2.8 EX with the appropriate TC.
The 28-135 IS USM is one exception... It's quite good if you can neglect its plastic play. It will not hold in 1 position and will extend under its own weight. It's also a varifocal design but then most Canon zooms are anyway!
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Old Oct 9, 2004, 3:30 PM   #19
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Graeme, you won't be disappointed with the Sigma EX 70-200mm f/2.8. It has the speedyou needin varying light and enough reach to cover closer (20-30 meter) action. Bottom line is that it's a sharp, contrasty, fast lens in the opinion of the people who own it. Build quality and durability are excellent, too, in the opinion of people who've had the lens awhile.

IMHO, the decision is fairly clear. First, for action and sports you do most likely need an f/2.8 - it gives you more margin for getting the shutter speed you need to freeze motion. Second, price does matter, and so the Sigma'svery close performance (some say virtually indistiguishable ) compared to the Canon L 70-200mm f/2.8earns the Sigma the vote because, bought new, there's about a $500 difference vs the Canon. That $500 grows to over $1,000 if you want IS. From a certain point of view, it's irrational to buy the Canon at such a high price differential. It seems that purchasing a Canon is more a result of faith in the brand than a reasoned assessment of performance value for $ spent. But then I'm not a brand nut and I don't have a lot o money lying around.

I have shot youth soccer with the Canon L 70-200mm f/2.8 IS USMin various light conditions with the IS on and off. For the exposure speeds that I used - 1/500th and up - there is no difference in the photos that I can detect, IS on or off, for what it's worth.
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