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Old Jul 7, 2004, 12:37 AM   #1
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Hello, all:

Yes, another D-SLR newbie asking for lens advice. I'm buying a Canon 10D next month, so I've been researching lenses in preparation for that purchase. I have researched quite a few of the posts here, and they've helped me narrow down my choices (thank you).

Here is what I intend to do with the camera:

- Gatherings: Birthdays, holidays (indoor/outdoor - lots of close-up people shots in various room sizes & lighting conditions)
- Sports: Primarily soccer (outdoor), gymnastics (indoor), and dance (indoor - usually very low-light with no flash allowed)
- Family portraits (this how I'm justifying the 10D to my wife
- Trips: Active kids at Disney World, etc - plus nature and scenery for trips to places like Colorado.

Photo Print Stats (% printed in that size):
- 4x6 (95%)
- 8x10 (4%)
- Larger than 8x10 (1%)

My lense budget is around $1,200 - $1,500 with filters, etc.

I've narrowed down a preliminary selection of Canon & Tamron lenses to meet these needs:

Wide Zoom (mostly for indoor people shots):
Canon EF 20-35 f/3.5-4.5 USM ($350)
or
Tamron SP AF17-35 f/2.8-4 Di LD Aspherical IF ($479)

Standard Zoom (general use/portraits):
Canon EF 28-135 f/3.5-5.6 IS USM ($395)
or
Tamron SP AF28-75 f/2.8 XR Di LD Asperical IF Macro ($350)

Telephoto Zoom (mostly for the sports listed above; some nature photography):
Canon EF 75-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM ($395)
or
Tamron AF 28-300 f/3.5-6.3 XR LD Aspherical IF Macro ($360)

I haven't researched Sigma much, because I personally don't know anyone who uses them. This doesn't mean I wouldn't try one, so if they have anything comparable to the above, please let me know.

Any feedback is appreciated. Thanks!
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 7:12 AM   #2
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I can't give you any info on third party lenses, however, I am familiar with the 75-300mm lens that Canon makes. I opted to get a 100-300mm USM instead due to internal focusing. This means the front element does not turn when you focus. This means a lot if your planing on using polarizer filter, and/or Coking filters.

The 100-300USM has several advantages.

-Internal focusing

-RIng USM (ultra sonic motor), which is Canons best focusing motor. It gives you the advantage of full time manual focusing. The motors are actually shaped like a ring and vibrate at a very low frequency. Because the motors are not coupled to a gear train, etc, you can move the lens anytime, without fear of damaging the internal lens. Offers fast and quiet focusing.

-Distance scale with IR marks.

Optically, they all perform about the same.

There are 3 versions of the 75-300mm lens. One has a regular micromotor for focusing (slower and noisier, but cheaper by about $30 in my neck of the woods). The second version offers a cut down version of USM. This version however, is not the top end ring variant. This offers slightly faster and quieter focusing, but you don't have full time manual focusing abilities. The third and most expensive option is to get the lens with IS (internal stabilization). This lens has several small gyroscopes that turn on if it senses you will get a blurry picture by hand holding it. This allows you to get sharper pictures by hand holding it by at least 2 f stops lower, then you could without it.

The pricing stratum goes like this- from least to most expensive.

-75-300mm micro motor.

-75-300mm cheap micro USM.

-100-300mm ring USM.

-75-300mm IS.

EDIT: I have read a lot of people who bought the 75-300 IS version, and who were dissatisfied with it. Also, Sigma is having lots of problems with compatibility with Canon cameras, as Canon does not license camera operations to third party lens makers...meaning the third party lens makers need to revers engineer things. Just not sure if older Sigma lenses are the culprit here, but I have also read that you can send their lenses back to get re-chipped.

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Old Jul 7, 2004, 11:26 AM   #3
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This is my setup and some reasons:

DR kit lens 18-55mm provides a good wide angle for group gatherings. Will add about $60 to cost of camera. Total cost with camera $900.

Canon 28-135 USM IS lens. My favorite lens and the IS is very helpful. Cost $400. Total Cost $1300.

Canon 50mm F1.8 MKII. A fast lens for low light conditions and portraits. Cost $70. Total Cost $1370.

Tamron 1.4X (cheaper model) teleconverter. Works very well with the Canon 28-135 USM IS lens. Equivalent to 300mm lens combination. Cost $70. Total Cost $1440.

I bought my fileters from www.2filters.com. Polarizer and UV for under $100.
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 12:08 PM   #4
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I myself would consider the following. I find it to be a great combo in my book.

Canon 28-135mm 3.5-5.6 IS USM (Has internal focus unlike the 75-300) $400
Canon 70-200mm L4.0 (Has internal focus and zoom) $650
Canon 1.4x Teleconverter. Only makes your lens one stop slower. ($100ish)

That there would cover almost everything you could think of. As someone else said about the 28-135 IS with a 1.4x, the IS is a great feature to have, and with the 1.4x you will still have auto focus. Also I find the 75-300mm IS too slow in focus speed. I miss lots of shots in the past. However its a great lens for zooming in on to say some Egrets in the water that dont move too fast... hehe I get my most sharp pictures from the 28-135 and the 70-200L. 75-300 I find can produce a lot of purple on the outside of whites, etc (I cant spell it so I wont type what its really called) lol

Good luck with whatever you decide with.
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 2:45 PM   #5
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The 28-135 will work well for portrates, parties, and around the house stuff. Even general vacation stuff too (but it isn't very wide, so it won't do huge sweeping landscapes or big buildings. And the IS will help when you can't use a tripod.

I would recommend the 50 mm f1.8 for the dance (indoor low light) Even then you'll probably need to bump the ISO. As others have said, its a nice lens and works well. Sharp, light & cheap.

The hardest is going to be gymnastics and soccer. Both of those need a good zoom, but the lighting isn't always great.

You'll probably want something in the range of 300mm or greater (but greater will be expensive.) And preferably f2.8 (but more likly f4.) Only you can say if a tele extender is acceptable or not. They drop quality and light and give you more focal length. It can be safely said that of you use a lower quality lens the tele converter will magnify its flaws and make the shot worse.

Eric
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 4:49 PM   #6
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You mention scenery/nature as one of the things you want to photograph. I think that you'll definitely something on the wide end for the 10D -- the 28 on the 28-135 folks here have mentioned won't be wide enough I suspect.

I second the 50 f1.8 suggested by Eric. Fantastic lens (and not just "for the money").

The three lenses I use the most would fit into your budget (but just barely):

17-40 f4L
70-200 f4L
50 f1.8
all Canon

Of course, this fits my style, which is generally landscapes, candids and sight-shooting. I don't go out of my way to shoot wildlife (hence the lack of a long zoom), nor do I shoot sports (hence the lack of a fast tele).

One other thing -- you WILL want to get an external flash for the indoor family gatherings (or nighttime) and for family portraits. Actually, you won't want it, you'll NEED it.

Graeme
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 7:01 PM   #7
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Thank you, everyone. The feedback has been great! One other question: my boss has a 10D, and he passed onbuying the Canon EF 28-135 f/3.5-5.6 IS USM because he had read quite a few posts/reviews calling it a "dust magnet". He ended up going with the Canon 28-200 instead. Is there any substance to this "dust" rumor?
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 7:57 PM   #8
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I have the 28-135 and have not noticed any dust problems.
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 10:18 PM   #9
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Indeed I have it as well, and no dust issues either. I have had mine for over a year so far.
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Old Jul 9, 2004, 1:39 PM   #10
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Ok, I've done some research on the teleconverters based onthe feedback. According to BHPhoto's site, neither of the Canon extenders (1.4x, 2x) are compatible with the Canon 28-135 IS lens. Looking at Tamron's Pro series extenders, neither of those is compatible, either - based on the lens specs. The only one that appears to pretty much work with anything is the Tamron 1.4x for $80 (recommended by gibsonpd3620 above). So, for a starting lens kit for all-around shooting, I think I'm going with the Tamron 1.4x and the Canon 28-135 IS.Also, I plan onbuying a UV Protector Glass filter to keep the lens safe. This should get me through soccer season and the holidays. Now I just need to decide on a speedlite (I would assume that's for a different forum).Thanks for the feedback :-)
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