Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 27, 2005, 9:52 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Mr. Peabody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 28
Default

Question?

I'm going to China in the next few days.

I plan to take my 20D and 3 lenses.

My lenses are....

Canon EF 75-300mm IS USM f/4-5.6
Canon 20D Kit Lens
Tamron SP AF 28-75 XR DI f/2.8


I plan to carry my 75-300mm lens with me all the time because I like to zoom and take pics alot.

As far as the other two lenses are concerned, which should I carry around mounted on my 20D for just broad daylight photos. Someone in another thread said the f/2.8 lens is great for low light and indoor use. I realize that. However, is it also a better lens for outdoor daylight photos than my 20D Kit lens?
Mr. Peabody is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 28, 2005, 8:58 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 95
Default

Sorry I can't answer your question because I don't own any lenses (yet). But I'm also very interested in the answers of other people.

Have a great time in China!

Ps. I've send you a PM.
Timberland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 3:45 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

Since the f2.8 lens is probably a much higher quality lens, it is almost certainly better to use the f2.8 lens than a slower lens.

But if you have enough light, there is probably little diference between shooting at 1/1500 f5.6 and 1/6000 f2.8 (except for the depth of field differences. It will be smaller at f2.8.) You might have a slightly sharper image at 1/6000, but even 1/1500 will stop most reasonable camera shake.

Are you asking if you should buy an f2.8 lens? Or is one of those lenses you listed an f2.8 lens? Please update that list with the max apertures... it would be very helpful.

To me, a much better question is one about focal length. What will you be shooting? People? Buildings? Landscapes? You can always rest your camera on a wall, or lean against a tree to help with a slow shutter speed. But you can walk out into the middle of a river to get the shot of the building on the other side because you need a 200mm lens and only have a 100mm lens. Get my point?

Weight should also matter. f2.8 lenses are normally very heavy. A lot of metal and glass. Try carrying one around your neck for several hours and you'll realize the benefit of a slower, but lighter, lens.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 3:57 PM   #4
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,543
Default

Another benefit of f/2.8 is that it enable the higher precision AF sensor on the 20D - You may be shooting at f/5.6 but when the camera is doing its AF (ie @ wide open) it put the focusing spot within a smaller DOF than it would at f/5.6 (ie the AF can be more sloppy...)

Also when you close a lens down a lens sharpen a bit, f/5.6 is two stop down, whereas if you shoot with an f/5.6 lens to start with it's still wide open! :shock:

-> You can always close a lens down, but you can't open a slower lens up... this is particularly true if you want emphasize the 'Bokeh' of an image :blah:
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 4:52 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Mr. Peabody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 28
Default

eric s wrote:
Quote:
Since the f2.8 lens is probably a much higher quality lens, it is almost certainly better to use the f2.8 lens than a slower lens.

But if you have enough light, there is probably little diference between shooting at 1/1500 f5.6 and 1/6000 f2.8 (except for the depth of field differences. It will be smaller at f2.8.) You might have a slightly sharper image at 1/6000, but even 1/1500 will stop most reasonable camera shake.

Are you asking if you should buy an f2.8 lens? Or is one of those lenses you listed an f2.8 lens? Please update that list with the max apertures... it would be very helpful.

To me, a much better question is one about focal length. What will you be shooting? People? Buildings? Landscapes? You can always rest your camera on a wall, or lean against a tree to help with a slow shutter speed. But you can walk out into the middle of a river to get the shot of the building on the other side because you need a 200mm lens and only have a 100mm lens. Get my point?

Weight should also matter. f2.8 lenses are normally very heavy. A lot of metal and glass. Try carrying one around your neck for several hours and you'll realize the benefit of a slower, but lighter, lens.

Eric
eric s, Yes, I own those three lens. The Tamron is the one that is f/2.8. I just didn't know if there was any huge benefit of using the Tamron f/2.8 lens over my 20D kit lens on a bright sunny day.
Mr. Peabody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 7:42 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

It is my understanding (not from experience, mind you) that the Tamron is a better lens than the 20D Kit lens. By that I mean optically. I don't know how fast each focuses or anything along those lines.

So yes, even on a sunny day I think the Tamron would be a better choice.

Check out these comments and see what you think:
http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/s...&cat=43&page=1

"good" or "better" is always a subject thing. To some people, a cheap Tokina lens is "good". To others only the absolute best will do. So this can be a difficult and subjective question to answer.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:37 PM.