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Old May 11, 2005, 12:26 PM   #1
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I am a new Canon Rebel XT user and I had purchased the Canon EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 II USM AutoFocus Wide Angle Telephoto Zoom Lens as my general purpose lens. This appears to be a great lens thus far but is just a little slow for my indoor needs.

I shoot a lot of indoor concerts and am considering getting a faster lens. I am strongly looking at the Sigma 24-135mm f/2.8-4.5 Aspherical IF AutoFocus Wide Angle Zoom Lens. I was wondering if anyone out there already owns this lens and uses it on a Canon camera to shoot low light pictures? Or any comments in general.

Thanks, Mark


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Old May 11, 2005, 3:32 PM   #2
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i have sigma 28-105 2.8 4.5 Aspherical i used with my rebel 300d alot of out of focus pics its bad lens maybe similar to that lens u looking for so my advice dont buy it go to canon
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Old May 11, 2005, 6:06 PM   #3
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why dont you check out sigma's excellent 24-70 ex 2.8.. will give you f2.8 across the zoom range, and is very sharp piece of glass..

tamron also makes a 28-75 2.8 that is a good lens as well..
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Old May 11, 2005, 9:02 PM   #4
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Sigmas EX series line (that 24-70 F2.8 is one) of lenses is excellent, and is their pro line.

Their standard non-EX consumer lenses are prone to soft focus and qustionable build quality.

Much the same as Canons excellent L series pro line, and their other standard consumer lenses.

You get what you pay for.

Peter.
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Old May 12, 2005, 10:08 PM   #5
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Hi,

You did not say what your price range for a new lens was. It would help. Most of the people I know shooting indoor sports use either the Canon 70-200 (IS or NO IS) or the Sigma 70-200 EX 2.8. If you need the IS than Canon would be your choice, But it is pricey.



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Old May 13, 2005, 6:57 AM   #6
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My price range would be under $600 but I've come to the realization that a lens isn't necessarily the solution. All we are talking about is 1 f-stop and that's only if the photo is taken at the low end of the zoom. As soon as you zoom in you are right back where you started from. The problem is the settings I'm using when I shoot the picture most likely.

On a stage lit with spotlights hair color and skintones tend to be washed out. When close up shots are taken peoples faces appear to glow. It was suggested to me on another thread yesterday that I try adjusting the XT's saturation parameter which sounded like a good idea to me.

Mark
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Old May 13, 2005, 1:22 PM   #7
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Hi Mark,
Which lens are you refering to? The ones menitoned in the posts above have a constant max F2.8 across the entire zoom range. Also for every 1 f-stop it is a doubling of the light passed by the lens.

Experimenting with the settings is always a good way to learn things. Post if you get any good results.

Peter.

mrcoons wrote:
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My price range would be under $600 but I've come to the realization that a lens isn't necessarily the solution. All we are talking about is 1 f-stop and that's only if the photo is taken at the low end of the zoom. As soon as you zoom in you are right back where you started from. The problem is the settings I'm using when I shoot the picture most likely.

Mark
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Old May 13, 2005, 1:57 PM   #8
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Well I've been told that I don't need a faster lens, that I need a sharper lens. So am comparing information on the Sigma 18-125 f/3.5-5.6 DCand the Canon EF 28-135 IS USM.

Both fall in my price range.



Here is an example of one that did not turn out too badly.

http://usera.imagecave.com/mrcoons/JN05396.jpg

Here is the exif data for it:
Camera
Make Canon
Model Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT
Orientation Upper Left
X resolution 72/1
Y resolution 72/1
Resolution unit inches
Date/time 5/6/2005 8:27:33 PM
YCbCr positioning co-sited
Image
Image description
Artist
Copyright
Exposure time 1/30 s
F-number f/4.5
Exposure program Normal program
ISO speed ratings 1600
Date/time original 5/6/2005 8:27:33 PM
Date/time digitized 5/6/2005 8:27:33 PM
Component config YCbCr
Shutter speed value 1/30 s
Aperture value f/4.5
Exposure bias value 0.00 EV
Metering mode Pattern
Flash Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
Focal length 92 mm
User comment
Colorspace sRGB
Pixel X dimension 2496
Pixel Y dimension 1664
Focal plane X res. 2496000/874
Focal plane Y res. 1664000/582
Focal plane res. unit inch
Custom Rendered Normal process
Exposure mode Auto exposure
White balance Manual white balance
Scene capture type Standard
Miscellaneous
Exif version 2.21
FlashPix version 1.0
Canon Maker Notes
Macro mode Normal
Flash mode Flash not fired
Continuous drive mode Continuous
Focus mode AI Servo
Image size Small
Easy shooting mode Manual
Contrast High
Saturation High
Sharpness High
ISO Unknown
Metering mode Evaluative
AF point selected Unknown
Exposure mode Program
White balance Unknown
Flash Bias 0 EV
Image type Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT


I can edit these images and get to something like this:

http://usera.imagecave.com/mrcoons/JN05396j.jpg

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Old May 13, 2005, 2:08 PM   #9
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If you need a sharper lens, the Sigma may not do the job. The Canon 28-135 has image stabilization, and that can be a help. However, you may need a lens that is both faster and sharper. Try the suggestion below, though, before you buy anything.

In any case, if you are getting blown out faces, try using exposure compensation. The problem is similar to shooting white birds with a forest background. The meter reads the scene, and the faces (or birds) are too small a portion of the scene to affect it enough. Even partial metering is not enough help. I find that setting -1 exposure comp, I get properly exposed white birds, and I suspect that would work for your spotlighted faces as well.

A side benefit of the -1 exposure comp is that witha fixedaperture (using aperture priority), your shutter speed will be twice as fast, or with a fixed shutter speed, you get a smaller aperture. If you have a slow lens problem, this might help there.


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Old May 13, 2005, 4:46 PM   #10
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I see potentially two problems in that image.

One is all that dark background and dark cloths. The camera would have biased expoure towards that large dark area, trying to expose it all towards 18%gray. Which would cause the much lighter faces for blow out. Next time try using exposure compensation, maybe -1 ev or so (expriement and bracket) to get the faces right. But when the skin/faces exposure is good the cloths will look much darker.

The other is the 1/30 shutter speed, handheld that would be a source of some motion blur.

Using -1 ev and maintaing the F4.5 apature would get you a 1/60 shutter speed. Which would help with the motion blur too. :-)

Peter.
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