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Old May 13, 2005, 1:56 PM   #1
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I despretly need advice. I just bought the 350D with the kitlens and i'm verry dissapointed. Now, I need an all-around lens to replace my 18-55. As i'm new to slr, i would really appreciate your help. Till now, i decided over the 2 abovementioned lenses. The Canon is IS and supposingly better quality, but the sigma has a better range. what do u think? Any other comments?
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Old May 13, 2005, 5:29 PM   #2
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Hmm, if you're VERY disappointed are you sure the problem is in the lens? The kit lens isn't rubbish by any means.

It may be that you're encountering the learning curve that many people moving up from P&S find when they first go to DSLR. Your pictures get worse before they get better, if you post some examples here then there are many experienced hands willing to help.

I hope you take no offense, certainly none is meant.

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Old May 13, 2005, 10:45 PM   #3
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Spend some time learning what you have now before you spend more money on enhanced equipment. I have owned my EOS 20D for about six monts (with an EF-S 17-85IS lens) and have been getting good pictures for about two or three months. There's a pretty steep learning curve with these powerful and complex digital SLR cameras. Throwing money at your problems sounds like a government solution. Take a lot of pictures, read a lot of books and visit a lot of web sites.
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Old May 14, 2005, 2:26 PM   #4
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Hello ,

I tend to agree with andreicretu since I feel like him .
I don't think that it got something to do with learning curves .

I explain what is the source of my disappointment :

Until now I used the Olympus 4000z and I got the 350D as a gift with the kit lens .
I put both cameras side by side on a 3pod and took the same picture on both
I tired every possible F stop on the 350D & the 4000z
ALL the pictures taken with the 350d are very soft comparing
to crystal sharp pictures I take with the 4000z with the same F stops
So this is not a learning curve issue this is absolutely the poor quality of the lens !
I understand that if I was able to find specific F stops that I can be satisfied with sharpness this is learning .....
But on a 3pod even not one sharp image @ any F stop even @ F8-F11
So this must be the lens .

I was able to prove my point by using other Canon lenses
I used the EF 80-200mm and the EF 24-80mm which are also not considered as great lenses but with them I at least could take Crystal sharp pictures when stopping at F8 and down , the pictures @ those F stops are sharp as on my 4000z .

So my conclusion is that the EFs 18-55mm mark II is a very very bad lens
even for a DSLR beginner like I am and it has nothing to do with learning curves .

After this deep disappointment I searched every possible web page and I discovered that
with the Mark I kit lens that was shipped with the 300D it was possible to get sharp
pictures when stopping at F8 and down as with all cheap lenses
but with the mark II lens that came with the 300D
Canon did some "miracle" and the picture gets softer when you stop down ...

So now I'm even more convinced that the lens is really bad .

If you look on pbase you will see that new pictures taken with the Sigma 18-200mm start to apear - until now the pictures are very impressive .

I was also able to find a test that compares between the

Tamron 18-200 Sigma 18-200 & Sigma 18-125

http://www.babelfish.altavista.com/b...l&lp=ja_en

from this site it seems that the Sigma 18-200 is even beter than her Sister the Sigma 18-125mm and it is a LOT LOT beter than the Tamron .

So I decided I will go for the Sigma 18-200mm as a replacment for the kit lens . I will also buy the Canon 50mm F1.8 which is the best lens that I saw , for indoor use .


best

Amir



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Old May 16, 2005, 6:36 AM   #5
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thank you for your replyes. Amir, what you say is true. Is not that i deny the existance of the "learning curve", but i had a lot of decent compacts before, like the v1, and i always worked on manual.....
i also want to add the following link for future comments
http://www.pbase.com/franklin/canon_sigma
it's a comparison between the kitlens 18-55, the 17-85 IS and the sigma. For what i've seen, the 17-85 is by far the best. what do you guys have to say?
best regards,
Andrei
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Old May 16, 2005, 7:23 AM   #6
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Don't forget that because of the smaller sensor, the same f-stops in a dslr and a compact do not have the same amount of depth of field. I'm not sure about your camera, but most have a minimum f-stop of f/8, which is roughly equal to f/22 on a dslr. P&S compact cameras also tend to do a lotof sharpening, where as dslr's tend to do far less, even at the maximum setting. Dslr makers design the post procsssing in camera based on the fact that most users will post process and sharpen later, and put the power in camera to something else.

It's probably not your lens.
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Old May 16, 2005, 7:56 AM   #7
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Amir_B wrote:
Quote:
Hello ,

I tend to agree with andreicretu since I feel like him .
I don't think that it got something to do with learning curves .

I explain what is the source of my disappointment :

Until now I used the Olympus 4000z and I got the 350D as a gift with the kit lens .
I put both cameras side by side on a 3pod and took the same picture on both
I tired every possible F stop on the 350D & the 4000z
ALL the pictures taken with the 350d are very soft comparing
to crystal sharp pictures I take with the 4000z with the same F stops
So this is not a learning curve issue this is absolutely the poor quality of the lens !
I understand that if I was able to find specific F stops that I can be satisfied with sharpness this is learning .....
But on a 3pod even not one sharp image @ any F stop even @ F8-F11
So this must be the lens .

I was able to prove my point by using other Canon lenses
I used the EF 80-200mm and the EF 24-80mm which are also not considered as great lenses but with them I at least could take Crystal sharp pictures when stopping at F8 and down , the pictures @ those F stops are sharp as on my 4000z .

So my conclusion is that the EFs 18-55mm mark II USM is a very very bad lens
even for a DSLR beginner like I am and it has nothing to do with learning curves .

After this deep disappointment I searched every possible web page and I discovered that
with the Mark I kit lens that was shipped with the 300D it was possible to get sharp
pictures when stopping at F8 and down as with all cheap lenses
but with the mark II lens that came with the 300D
Canon did some "miracle" and the picture gets softer when you stop down ...

So now I'm even more convinced that the lens is really bad .

If you look on pbase you will see that new pictures taken with the Sigma 18-200mm start to apear - until now the pictures are very impressive .

I was also able to find a test that compares between the

Tamron 18-200 Sigma 18-200 & Sigma 18-125

http://www.babelfish.altavista.com/b....html&lp=ja_en

from this site it seems that the Sigma 18-200 is even beter than her Sister the Sigma 18-125mm and it is a LOT LOT beter than the Tamron .

So I decided I will go for the Sigma 18-200mm as a replacment for the kit lens . I will also buy the Canon 50mm F1.8 which is the best lens that I saw , for indoor use .


best

Amir
From what you describe I'd still say it's a learning curve issue.

I really hope I'm wrong and spending money on new lenses helps you out.

But how about this for an idea: Assume the problem is you not the camera. Get some books, go on a course, read a lot on the web, and most important of all read your camera manual and experiment and take lots of photos.

Give yourself 6 weeks, and go back and see whether your results with the kit lens have improved. What have you got to lose? If you're right you can still get a better lens but will have more knowledge to apply, if it isn't the lens though you will have saved yourself some cash.

If you post some of your disappointing pictures in this thread then we might be able to help.
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Old May 16, 2005, 10:01 AM   #8
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I tend to agree with what peripateticand rob_strainhave said.

This "soft image" issue is a common complaint from people new to DSLR's and has been gone over in many previous threads.

Basically a P&S produces a finished image ready for viewing and printing, a DSLR's output requires some post processing to become usable. It is standard and working as designed.

It is always an outside possibility you have a really bad lens, but it is not likely. Go to a photo store and try some of their lenses on your camera, take a few images with them then go home and see if anything has improved. It will give you an idea where the issues is before you spend any more money. :idea:

Peter.
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Old May 16, 2005, 3:18 PM   #9
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i tend to agree with peter, peripatetic, and rob strain on all points...

give yourself some time to get over the learning curve and try the little experiment again.. i would focus some of your attention on learning some post-processing, and then retry the experiment comparing your p&s to a post-processed dslr pic as it is an unfair comparison to compare the two out of camera, as the dslr is "soft" by design..

btw- have FUN learning your new equipment :|

enjoy, dustin
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Old May 16, 2005, 10:58 PM   #10
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I too am new to dSLR's moving from a Canon Pro90 to the 350XT. Ihad the same concerns that Andreicretu had, suprised at the soft images out of the camera. But like the others said, stick with it and take more pictures.The quality does get better and I am learning to post process my photo's.
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