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Old Jul 15, 2005, 7:33 AM   #1
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I purchased a 70-200 last week and looking at the front element, I decided that it seemed bound and determined to get scratched, so I looked for a UV filter to protect it. I found prices up to $65!

I did a little digging and on ebay I purchased a filter from http://www.texassoundandlight.com (which is just an ebay store front) and got an Eitar UV filter for $13 shipped.

Just something to tuck away.

(...and no, I'm not selling them :G)
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Old Jul 15, 2005, 8:49 AM   #2
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Is there a reason to buy an expensive lens and then put a cheap filter on it?

Some are cut and polished like a lens other are just stamped from ordinary glass... and then there's the various anti-glare coatings that your lens is designed to prevent which you're just defeating!
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Old Jul 15, 2005, 9:00 AM   #3
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I would guess that putting a $13 piece of glass on a $1700 (if it if the 70-200L2.8IS lens)would make the lens a whole lot worse.If you spend that kind of money on a lens wouldnt you want a quality piece of glass protecting it?



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Old Jul 15, 2005, 9:35 AM   #4
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Would you buy a telephoto to capture birds at a feeder and then shoot through a dirty window?Anything you put on the front end of that lens is an important issue and deserves to be the best you can handle. Some of the filters I use are pricey but they have always performed well. If you buy the best you can you'll not be sorry nor will you buy another later!
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Old Jul 15, 2005, 10:21 AM   #5
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why bother with a good lens if you are just going to throw cheap filter on it.. if you are careful with your lenses at all, one is not necessary anyways, just throw on a lens hood for protection...
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Old Jul 15, 2005, 11:08 AM   #6
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I purchased a 100-400L and was never happy with the images since they were always soft. I then removed the Hama UV filter that had been supplied with the lens and Bingo I could see again. The difference was dramatic so either buy a good quality filter or don't bother and just be careful!
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Old Jul 15, 2005, 1:11 PM   #7
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Well, perhaps you're right (although I didn't get the IS).

Its easy enough to test though...I"ll put it on a tripod, take a picture with and without.

On the other hand, in situations where I know things may get a bit messy, its nice to have what amounts as a throwaway filter.

I just think that 60+ for a UV filter is excessive.

What do you think about the Hoya brand?
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Old Jul 15, 2005, 1:44 PM   #8
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tkrotchko wrote:
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What do you think about the Hoya brand?
That's still Japanese... Go for the German! :-)

B+W or Heliopan... Do you want the best? :blah:


FYI - http://www.schneideroptics.com/filte...Bw_difference/
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Old Jul 16, 2005, 1:44 PM   #9
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NHL wrote:
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tkrotchko wrote:
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What do you think about the Hoya brand?
That's still Japanese... Go for the German! :-)
If you look closely, you see thatCanon lenses are also Japanese.

None of the pros I know, including nature photographers and sports photographers, keep a "protection" filter on their lenses. With digital, a polarizer when appropriate or a graduated ND is about all I can find anyone using. They all, however, keep a hood on the lens all the time.
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