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Old Mar 11, 2006, 8:39 AM   #1
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Just got my 20d and want to additional lenses One Macro for really good close ups for flowers and bugs. Then the telephoto for action at Nascar races. I do have a little more than 2000.00 if I have to go over. Could you post a link to the lense that you suggest. I was readingquite a few posts butno prices or links were given. Thanks Fred.



Btw This is the best forum for camers I have found. Great work guys!!!!
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Old Mar 11, 2006, 9:58 AM   #2
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The Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG is a popular lens, and it's got HSM (Hypersonic Motor) Focusing (similar to Canon's USM).

It's usually around $800 at reputable online vendors and everyone seems to really like this lens (in Canon and other Manufacturer's lens mounts).

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM Lens at B&H

Note that Sigma recently announced an upgraded version of this lens with 1:3.5 Macro ability, but I don't know if anyone has the newer version in stock yet.

http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/len...mp;navigator=3

In the Canon lineup you may want to look at the Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM AF Lens. It's usually around $1,100.00. They also have an IS (Image Stabilization) version at around $1,700

Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L AF USM Lens at B&H

Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM AF Lens at B&H

The Sigma Macro lenses are also popular choices. Something like the Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG Macro would make a good choice at around $399, and would allow you to focus from a bit further away compared to the shorter 50mm macros around. It's a 1:1 Macro lens.

Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG Macro at B&H

Another popular choice is the Tamron SP 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro AF Lens.

Tamron SP 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro AF Lens

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Old Mar 11, 2006, 10:05 AM   #3
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Speaking of the used market, you can sometimes find some bargains (saving the extra money for something else).

My favorite vendors for used gear (in order of preference, since I think KEH is more conservative on used gear ratings, based on my experience with them, followed by B&H):

http://www.keh.com

http://www.bhphovideo.com

http://www.adorama.com

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Old Mar 11, 2006, 10:11 AM   #4
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How about this Canon Lens for macro:

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...ns-Review.aspx

About $450

For the cars maybe the 70 -200 F2.8 - about $1100

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...ns-Review.aspx

If you don't need a zoom and want more reach, the Canon 300 IS F4 might do it - $1150.

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...ns-Review.aspx

I have the 70-200 and the 300 F4 and I can assure you they are fine lenses. They both work well with the 1.4 extender.I've been shooting mainly birds but want to get into macro photography myself.


Good luck.

//jim

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Old Mar 11, 2006, 10:40 AM   #5
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WOW, You guys are great. I was reading in one of the reviews the the 70-200 with IS would not be the best choice for fast moving objects?
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Old Mar 11, 2006, 10:54 AM   #6
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Fred Pocius 406 wrote:
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WOW, You guys are great. I was reading in one of the reviews the the 70-200 with IS would not be the best choice for fast moving objects?
IS does nothing to help you freeze action. It helps prevent camera shake at lower shutter speeds. Since freezing action requires higher shutter speeds, the IS is not of any real use (at least not for a 200mm lens - a 400mm lens would be different).

The IS is beneficial in other situations (hand-holding in low light for still shots) but just not in sports. I would suggest getting a 1.4x TC to get you a bit more reach with the 70-200 2.8. You'd then have a 280mm lens capable of f4. I have the Sigma 70-200 2.8 and can say it's a great lens.
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Old Mar 11, 2006, 10:59 AM   #7
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I've seen users comment on pros and cons of IS (with some indicating that IS can actually hurt sharpness). I'm not so sure I buy that, though, and you can always turn it off. I've also read that newer versions of IS are designed to work better when panning.

IS is designed to help compensate for camera shake, not subject movement. To freeze action, you'll need to keep shutter speeds up fast enough.

The "rule of thumb" for reducing blur from camera shake is 1/focal length for a hand held camera.

In other words, if shooting at 100mm (35mm equivalent), you'd want shutter speeds of 1/100 second or faster. If shooting at 200mm, you'd want shutter speeds of 1/200 second or faster. If shooting at 300mm, you'd want shutter speeds of 1/300 second or faster, etc.

You need faster shutter speeds as focal lengths get longer, because camera shake is magnified at longer focal lengths.

This is only a "rule of thumb" as some people can hold a camera steadier than others, and some may need even faster shutter speeds to prevent blur from camera shake.

IS buys you 2 or 3 stops over what you could hand hold without a tripod. IOW, you may need shutter speeds 4 to 8 times as fast to prevent blur from camera shake without it, if shooting in conditions where a slower shutter speed is preferred.

That's not usually the case with fast moving subjects (you'll need to keep shutter speeds up). But, there are always exceptions.

Personally, if money was no object, I'd prefer to have it if I were shooting Nascar. For one thing, you may not want to keep shutter speeds fast enough to freeze all action.

I've seen some very nice photos at slower shutter speeds while panning with a car to enhance the feel of speed (from blurred backgrounds, blurred wheels), while still getting the car relatively sharp. If shutter speeds are too fast, you won't get that effect.


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Old Mar 11, 2006, 11:05 AM   #8
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P.S.

I think I needed IS for this one (and faster shutter speeds would have been desirable, too). :-)

I've got a Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D now with anti-shake for every lens. So, the next time I get to the speedway, I'll make sure to try it with and without Anti-Shake enabled.


Konica Revio KD-510z (a pocket camera), ISO 400 (that's all it will do), 1/20 second, f/2.8, panning with the lead.



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Old Mar 11, 2006, 11:14 AM   #9
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So the IS can be turned off on the lenses..That makes my decision a little easier knowing it can be turned off. Sorta like getting 2 lenses in one?
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Old Mar 11, 2006, 11:24 AM   #10
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Yes. It's got a switch for IS on/off, as well as two different IS modes (mode 2 works best for panning from what I understand).

If you give it some time, perhaps some of our forum members that have used these lenses for Nascar (or similar events) will comment on the IS versus non-IS lens versions for this purpose.


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