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Old Apr 2, 2003, 6:57 AM   #1
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Default 10D and NON USM lenses

:?

Folks,
When I buy my 10D, (soon I hope), am I going to be disappointed by a non USM Canon lens?
I've never used autofocus on an SLR before, only manual lenses.
I'm familiar though with AF on a so called "prosumer" digital.
It seems that non-usm are reasonably cheap, so should I risk it?
(Money is very tight!)

Regards , 'n' thanks,

J2 (UK).
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Old Apr 2, 2003, 3:52 PM   #2
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All technical information aside, there is an old addage that usually rings true:

"You get what you pay for."

I was recently talking about lenses with a photographer that I know, and we covered this very subject, he said "Why buy a state of the art camera only to turn around and use a lower quality lense on it!?" Makes sense.

IMO, if you're gonna buy a $1500 camera, you gotta buy top of the line lenses!

Just my 2 cents

Steve P
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Old Apr 2, 2003, 3:59 PM   #3
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Default Non USM lenses

Thanks for that Steve, and I do understand what you are saying but....
If the optics are the same, (IF), and its just a bit slower and noisier, then it isnt really degrading the final result. As far as the best is concerned, well that'd be "L" glass, yes? How many Canon DSLR users only use L type lenses? 10% 20%?.

I know I sound as though I'm trying to answer my own question, and really that isnt so. I'm just wondering aloud I suppose......
:?

Regards,

J2
UK.
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Old Apr 2, 2003, 9:58 PM   #4
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I totally understand your viewpoint. The "L" series glass is way too expensive for most, you're right. I suppose at the "affordable level" you just have to go w/ the best array of features for what you can afford. Maybe hold off on a lense for a little while so you can save up a bit more to get a better performer. I thought you were referring to "offbrand" lenses which are substantially cheaper and have ower build quality. The difference between the L series and the IS lenses *besides price* is probably not substantial enough for "casual" picture taker to lose sleep over. Just do your homework, figure out the shots you want to take, and then buy the best you can afford to accomplish those tasks.

Best of luck to you!

Steve
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Old Apr 6, 2003, 11:45 AM   #5
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Steves basically said what I would. I thought I'd just echo something here with an added point.

J2D2 said:
Quote:
If the optics are the same, (IF), and its just a bit slower and noisier, then it isnt really degrading the final result. As far as the best is concerned, well that'd be "L" glass, yes? How many Canon DSLR users only use L type lenses? 10% 20%?.
The problem with that statement is that the less expensive glass is *rarely* equivalent in optics. If that premis was true, though, I would completely agree with the rest of the statement.

The real question is what is good enough for you. For most people, the non L lenses do all that they will ever need. If the picture isn't "tack" sharp it might not matter for you. At 4x5 it looks good, but if you print that picture at something over a foot in either direction, you'll see it. The detail isn't there because it isn't as sharp as it needs to be. But how many people really make prints that big? Not many. Therefor, they won't see the difference in optical quality.

The end result is (as tgrwoods6 says) to figure out what you need (faster focus? F2.8? IS? All weather build construction? Macro Focus? UD-glass? Close focusing distance? ...) see what fits within your budget that satisfies as much of those needs as possible and buy it.

Another option is get a Sigma EX. I've read of many people happy with some of them (especially the 70-200 F2.8 EX). It's not cheap, but its $400 less than an equivalent "L" lens.
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Old Oct 12, 2003, 3:23 PM   #6
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I use Sigma glass and you can't beat it for the price and quality. I just can't justify spending $1000 for "L" glass. For wide angle Sigma 15-30. For thos long shots, Sigma 28-200 HSM.
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Old Oct 14, 2003, 4:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrwoods6
I was recently talking about lenses with a photographer that I know, and we covered this very subject, he said "Why buy a state of the art camera only to turn around and use a lower quality lense on it!?" Makes sense.


Steve P
is that the same thing as someone is driving a Cadillac but with 4 spare tires on? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Old Oct 14, 2003, 4:37 PM   #8
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Default Re: 10D and NON USM lenses

Quote:
Originally Posted by J2D2
:?

Folks,
When I buy my 10D, (soon I hope), am I going to be disappointed by a non USM Canon lens?

J2 (UK).
I would say: at least get the Canon USM lenses if you can't afford the L lenses. Canon USM lenses always work better with Canon cameras, and the AF performance are unbeatable with USM compare to off-brand lenses. Sigma HSM is also compatible with Canon cameras, almost as fast as Canon USM, other than that, I know none of the other brands have anything close to USM. Cheers
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Old Oct 15, 2003, 9:07 PM   #9
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there is one caveat that hasn't been mentioned - not all USM lenses are true USMs. USM stands for 'ultra sonic motor' and in the better USM lenses you'll have the ability to focus manually as well as using the AF without adjusting a switch. Canon however confuses things by labelling some lenses USM when they don't have the ring motor. What you're getting is a faster, quieter focusing but if you want to override the focus you have to move a switch like on the non-USM lens.

If you're getting a 'real' USM then spend the extra money, if it's a micro motor then I wouldn't pay the premium.
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