Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 19, 2006, 4:46 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 17
Default

Can experts say which lens is the best for 350D for wedding photography purpose?
Adiseshanaik is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 19, 2006, 7:09 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
John at the Beach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Southeastern NC
Posts: 491
Default

Adiseshanaik......
I have been shooting weddings for about 5yrs now and have been using the Canon
28-200mm lens...I've used this lens with the D30, 10D, and the 20D with good results...
I like the range you get with it for those close ups and from the back of the church shots...A good friend uses the Tamron 28-300mm and has gotten good results with that lens...Both lenses are not that expencive...Also both lens have not received the best ratings from the rating guys but they both have served us well...Within the past year, I have switched to the Canon 24-70mm 2.8 and I am getting awsome pictures...Of course this lens is about 3 times the cost of my other one but the quality I am getting from the L series is worth every penny...I also have the 70-200mm 2.8 non IS for my outside weddings and portraits...The results from this lens is also mind blowing....
The old saying, "You get what you pay for" has never been more correct...There are other brands out there and alot of photogs on this forum have mentioned those from time to time...I have stuck with Canon but I am sure you could find a suitable off brand that would work just as well...
john
:|
John at the Beach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 1:42 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 17
Default

Thank you very much for the detailed reply Mr.John. Do you prefer only fast lenses for Wedding?
Adiseshanaik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 4:18 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
John at the Beach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Southeastern NC
Posts: 491
Default

I have found out that fast lenses in a dark church give me much better pictures without having to do any photoshop enhancing...For a beach or outside wedding a good lens will work just fine...But as I said, in a dark location the 2.8L lens is what I would recommend...Much less computer time fixing and sharping...Some of the other photogs on the forum have talked about the other brands of 2.8 lenses and may give you advise on a cheaper on...Canon L lenses arent cheap...I look at it this way...One or two weddings lets me buy new and improved equipment...For now, I do weddings and portraits and other types of photos as a fun thing...I also have a 9 to 5 job...:roll:
John at the Beach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 4:19 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 81
Default

I'm going to be doing the photography for my friends wedding this weekend and while i've done a few weddings before, I always get a little nervous.

I'll be shooting with a Rebel XT and a Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Image Stabilized lens. I have yet to shoot a wedding with this lens and i'm not very experienced with it.

Do you have any good pointers for me? The wedding is outdoors in Palm Springs in the early afternoon. My Uncle who is a professional photographer told me that i really need to pay attention to the aperture of the lens because when you shoot at fast speeds, the lens tends to get super shallow depth of field compared to the low end lenses i'm used to shooting with.
Andrew LB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 7:55 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
wsandman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 318
Default

Andrew,

Shoot aperture priority varying the aperture values based on whether or not you want everything in focus or just the primary subjects. F2.8 will make the back groundvery soft (blur) and F11 - F16 will get most things in focus.If it's sunny, try to get shots with the sun to the subjects back or in the shade. Bright sunlight can make the friendliess person seem very mean in photographs.

If you can, make sure you have some sort of back up camera available and shoot on more than one card. Even though you're doing this as a favor, insist on everyone treating you with the same respect they'd give a "professional". You will be glad you did later. Also get a list of the standard shots the couple wants now and use this list to help take some of the pressure off during the ceremony. If you get flustered,switch to the green square (fully automatic) until you regain your composure. You can also use the portrait mode for portraits if you are having problems. Do you have a flash? It helps with the backlit shots.

Good luck, you'll do fine. You have a world class lens in the 70 - 200 L. If you can get a wider angled lens, that would help a lot since 1.6 cropping factor makes the 70 mm look like a 100+ mm lens at the wide end.

Bill
wsandman1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 8:00 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
John at the Beach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Southeastern NC
Posts: 491
Default

Andrew...
Your uncle is correct about the shallow dof...especially at the upper end of the lens
if your close to your subjects...This being an outdoor wedding will be easier because you can back off from the ceremony and zoom in for those shots that you want a shallow dof or zoom back to 70mm or so and get pretty much normal dof...You may not have to worry to much if its a bright sunny day....But do be aware of your aperture and make adjustments if you have to...I mostely shoot in the program mode either at ISO 200 or
ISO 400...Things start moving in the wedding and I dont have time to check this and check that...I have used ap priority some with good results at f5.6 - f8.0...Mostly with
bridal portraits where I can check the exposure though...Good Luck....
:|
John at the Beach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 8:13 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 81
Default

Thanks for the imput. Its very much appreciated.

I do have a flash, a Canon Speedlight 420ex. And i'll definitely use it if i'm shooting in a backlit situation.

The ceremony is outdoors and the sun will not directly behind the guests... but kinda behind them to the side a little. Kinda like a 7-8 o'clock position.

I may grab another lens from a shop near here called Cal's Cameras in Newport Beach. My only other canon lenses are the kit lens and a 75-300mm f/4-5.6 USM III.

I'll also have my fathers Leica 35mm camera (which i am not very familiar with... i'm born of the digital age... ) as a backup as well as a friends 300D.


I will also have a 2gb microdrive, 1gb CF Ultra Sandisk II, and another 512mb Ultra Sandisk II. Two extra batteries as well.

I plan on shooting as many shots as I possibly can so i have plenty of photos to work with. The last wedding I did, I was the backup photographer and while not near a professional, my photos were at least on par with the pro they hired.
Andrew LB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2006, 10:57 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Caboose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 625
Default

another good idea for group shots is to use the A-Dep setting. This setting tries to bring everything in focus. If you do have a back up body mount a wide or normal lens on it with your long lens on the other body, then you are ready to zoom in for the first kiss, and also ready for them to walk back down the aisle. If there is a wedding coordinator, make friends with this person. They can help you out a lot, and also tell you what you can and can't do.
Caboose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 20, 2006, 7:08 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
John at the Beach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Southeastern NC
Posts: 491
Default

Andrew....
You may know this already but I will mention it...I shoot using the center focus only, 99.9% of the time and focus lock on the brides or subjects face...The camera will meter off of her skin tone and adjust for that...If you meter off the white dress the face might be to dark and if you meter off black tux you will get a blown out face...To me its better to have a correct smile, sharp and clear...Again, focus lock on the face and recompose the shot if necessary...I also shoot a bit "loose"...This way, If I have to I will have room to crop...Nothing worse than having to cut off feet when you blow up a great shot...
:roll:
John at the Beach is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:24 AM.