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Old Jun 24, 2006, 7:57 AM   #1
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I just got my first DSLR, a Eos 30D and i have a few Sigma lenses on order that will show up any day now.

I have been looking around and speaking with different dealers but i am unable to find any real useful answers.

Im mostly shooting in avalible light indoors and outdoors, sometimes it´s a landscape, other times it could be a car or a sunset.

I have understood that i should choose a multicoated filter regardless of what type i get, but what kind should i get?

Is there a general rule that would help me choose filters?
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 11:22 AM   #2
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I'll save you some time, if you choose to use a filter go with Hoya's Pro 1 series. Even better than the Hoya is B+W or Heliopan, though more costly. Also, as you've already stated, make sure their multicoated.
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 11:29 AM   #3
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Do a search for filters in the Canon forums, there's a thread every week or two.

Most of us don't use filters.
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 11:34 AM   #4
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I did before posting my question, but i was unable to find anything relevant, maybe my search pattern was wrong?


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Old Jun 24, 2006, 4:13 PM   #5
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I have the sigma 30 f/1.4, ef 85 f/1.8, and efs 17-85. I got a free filter when i got the sigma, but I noticed major flare problems the first time i tried it indoors (didn't really notice any sharpness issues)

So i dont have filters for my primes, which have long hoods, anyway. But I do have one for my zoom. The lens hood for it isn't really long on the sides so I feel safer with a filter on... Plus, my friends like to use it because they arent crazy enough to spend $$ on camera stuff like me . I got the Kenko Pro wide angle filter and I didnt run into any flare problems like the one I got for free. But I haven't tested for any sharpness performance ( I just left it on the minute I bought the lens ).

But if you get your equipment insured, I think there's less reason to get a filter.

Here's a link to another post:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=65
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 4:38 PM   #6
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Thank you for your replys, i dont plan to have the filter for protection since i do take care of my stuff.

Iguess i wanted to know if there are any benifits in terms of better images to be had from filters under some conditions and what thoose conditions are if they excist.

One dealer wanted me to buy UV filters, another said skylight and a friend of mine said to buy a polarization?(spelling) filter.

Since i have no clue as to which filter does what and when to use them i figured i should ask

One way for me to find out is to buy one of each of the above filters and try for myself, but i assume that the answers are allready here somewhere.

BoYFrMSpC: Thank you for the old thread, i guess the main reason ppl use filters are for protection.
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 6:19 PM   #7
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Get the polarizer for some nice effects in certain outdoor landscapes. The others you can do without unless you're overly worried about damaging your lens.
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Old Jun 25, 2006, 12:21 AM   #8
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I agree with spence. The polarizer can enrich colours and reduce reflections in water and windows. It's very useful. The effects from any other filter can probably be done in photoshop, anyway.

But make sure it's a circular polarizer. Linear polarizers won't work on digital sensors.

A UV filter can reduce haze (IE near water front, in the mountains, or clear blue day where the UVs are significant enough to effect your picture)... A skylight filter (I think) is just a warming filter. Both are usually recommended by sellers as protection filters.

Are they really worth it? I think most people just ignore them, anyway...

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