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Old Jun 27, 2006, 11:43 AM   #1
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I ordered an EOS 350D. I have been reading that the kit lens is really bad. To be honest, I know nothing about lenses, and need some expert advice about what a possible upgrade.

I like to shoot all kinds of subjects, and in all kinds of situations. The only things I tend not to shoot are portraits and sports. I dable here and there in macro, but nothing rarely so it's not so important. I figure when the time comes I'll go and get a macro lens. My budget is a little tight and have about ( £150 to £300 )

Should I keep the kit lens 18mm - 55mm and get a zoom lens to compliment it? If so, which lens?

Should I go for lens, that maybe does not give me as much zoom, but will improve on the kit lens and still give me a decent zoom range? I'm thinking around X 6 - 8 optical.

What should I do? Any ideas? Advice really appreciated. I know you experts probably have to go through this stuff a million times so thanks for being patient and your advice.
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Old Jun 27, 2006, 3:08 PM   #2
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Blueberry,

The kit lens is a decent lens - especially considering the price. You're not going to find any other zoom lenses for that price that perform so well. Of course there are better lenses - but they cost a lot more.

As for the bad rap on the kit lens I think a lot of it has to do with people new to SLR photography blaming the equipment for bad photos.

My advice is: since you already ordered the kit lens, just keep it for now. Use it for a couple of months and find out where that lens is falling short ofYOUR needs. You may find (as another recent poster did ) that problems you are experiencing have nothing to do with the lens you are using but rather understanging some of the aspects of SLR shooting (DOF and focus points, etc). This way you end up buying equipmenent because your current equipment can't fit a specific need you have. That makes recommending a new lens or whatever much easier. And, you don't end up wasting money on an expensive paper weight just because that lens is a valued resource to another photographer who has completeley different needs than you do.

Inside of two months you'll have a better idea of where your needs are and can buy the right 'next piece' in your photo gear puzzle.
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Old Jun 27, 2006, 3:34 PM   #3
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I agree with John.I went that same way for a year other than I bought a 70-300 zoom lens to compliment the kit lens.If your looking to take nature,ie animal,pics then I wouldrecommend the sigma 70-300 APO DG Macro.I have the one before the DG and loved it.It is a real good lens for a real good price(around $220 US).This way you get a real good focal length between the kit and the telephoto lenses.This should give you a real good start and once you get a feel for your camera and know what you really want to get into you should be ready for an upgrade.
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Old Jun 29, 2006, 12:46 PM   #4
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Thank you, both, for your advice.

I believe that the Canon kit lens has no depth of field markers? Am I right? Is this something that I'm going to need? I also read something about it not having a proper manual focus? I read this about the 55mm - 200mm, and don't know if it applies to the standard kit you get.
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Old Jun 30, 2006, 11:57 AM   #5
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there are no DOF markers on the kit lens. In fact, it doesn't even have distance markers. I wouldn't worry about it.

There is a proper manual focus. Just switch to MF mode and you're good to go. However, the focus ring is at the end of the len and it's pretty thin. With the 350d, the viewfinder is really small and dim and I doubt you'll be MFing even 5% of the time. Almost every time I tried MFing, I'd usually focus worse than the AF system.
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Old Jun 30, 2006, 7:43 PM   #6
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you will be maually focusing mostly when you are doing macro,at least this is how it works for me and the kit lens isnt a really good macro lens.Now I am not sure if in landscaping you manually focus though as I dont do landscaping.
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Old Jul 1, 2006, 1:16 AM   #7
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Just bought the 100mm macro and like the bear said, manual is the way to go with this one. But, it takes great auto shots as well. I love this lens.Can you say "sharp". I had the kit lens and I did not like.:sad: Soft is the word for me. That's just my thoughts overall. I'm looking into picking up a 16-35 and a 70-200 IS and I think I'll be set for life:-)
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Old Jul 1, 2006, 7:28 PM   #8
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picturethis62 wrote:
Quote:
I'm looking into picking up a 16-35 and a 70-200 IS and I think I'll be set for life:-)
Trust me, you'll never be 'set for life' :blah: You always think, I just need this one more thing and that's the last piece of gear I'll need to buy. You know, you're still in denial - you can't control your addiction until you admit you have one :G:G
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