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Old Jul 20, 2006, 10:46 AM   #1
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Quick question, can you use a circular polariser on the 18-55mm Canon kit lens? Thanks.
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Old Jul 20, 2006, 11:47 AM   #2
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Yes you can, get one that's 58mm in size.
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Old Jul 20, 2006, 10:55 PM   #3
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Yes, but the front of the kit lens rotates when focus changes so using a polariser is a little bit tricky. You'll need to get focus, adjust the polariser and then re-focus (should already be spot-on) and take the shot. Very difficult to impossible with moving subjects and a pain in the arse with stationary subjects ...
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Old Jul 20, 2006, 11:02 PM   #4
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I don't see why everyone makes a big deal out of the front element rotating when using a polarizer.

I use a polarizer all the time on my kit lense and have never had a problem. You just need to get a polarizer that rotates independently of its mount. So you screw it on all the way and you're still able to rotate the actual filter.

Then it's just a case of adjusting the polarizer to what you want then focusing. I usually either keep a finger on the polarizer during focusing and it doesn't interfere - just don't have a death-grip on it and you'll be fine.

Another method with circular polarizers that rotate independently of their mounts is to focus, then adjust the polarizer. Those that rotate smoothly won't throw off the focus.
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Old Jul 21, 2006, 4:01 AM   #5
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I also just hold the polarizer in place as the kit lens was focusing. But I think there are two potential problems (for long time use):

1) you are wearing out the motor faster
2) you are wearing out the rotating element (more wobbly later on)

But I don't see this as much of a problem for a cheap kit lens :roll:
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Old Jul 21, 2006, 8:22 AM   #6
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jacks wrote:
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You'll need to get focus, adjust the polariser and then re-focus (should already be spot-on) and take the shot.
I take it from this that the polariser always has to be a certain way up? I'd would of assumed being a circular polariser that it didn't matter if it rotated with the AF?
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Old Jul 21, 2006, 11:05 AM   #7
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Circular polarizers need to be rotated for the desired affect. This is good because it allows you to determine how much light is polarized (i.e. too much and the sky may be unrealistically dark or too little and contrast is lost).
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