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Old Jul 25, 2006, 9:23 PM   #1
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This topic has certainly been addressed a thousand times. Sincerest apologies for re-hashing but I HAVE searched. I've gone back several pages and find nothing.

What are some good overall opinions on beginner, walkaround, first lens for the 30d? Is this kit lens the reason some new owners have complained of soft images, lack of speed in AF, etc???

I've personally followed enough similar posts to understand the questions (what will you be using it for, etc, etc.) Just looking for a good walkaround lens you won't regret owning or keeping for some time to come. Seems the kit lens will disappoint very quickly. Why pay ANY for a lens you don't intend to get a useful life out of beyond initial learning phase?

IF still buying it for that learning phase is the ultimate advice, what is the benefit of keeping the kit lens if you KNOW you will eventually replace it? When do you ever pull it back out???

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Old Jul 26, 2006, 6:06 AM   #2
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You certainly have a point- i recently replaced my kit lens and now it just takes up space. However, besides the learning phase, it will also point you in a direction when looking at lenses. You'll find out what you really really want, and what you don't really need.

I, for example, really didn't like the slow aperture on the kit lens after using it for a couple of months, but the focal length was alright. So now I would look at the EF 17-55 f/2.8 or the tokina 16-50 f/2.8 .

someone opposite to me would want a larger focal range (more zoom) and wouldn't mind the slow aperture.

Note, both are general purpose zooms, but which one do you REALLY want? You may be able to think it through without ever laying a finger on a lens, but it's a safer bet to just buy the kit lens and try it out. So although you throw that 100 initially, you avoid bad purchases(I.E. buy lenses that you won't really use) that could very well exceed $100.
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Old Jul 26, 2006, 11:33 AM   #3
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What do you shoot most option?A lot depends on that. For example I walk around with 100-400L as I shoot birds. You wouldn't see many folks doing that.
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Old Jul 29, 2006, 7:29 AM   #4
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Should have seen the "what do you shoot" question coming. (I've had sooooo many "newbie/teach me" questions lately, I sort of felt many of the regulars in this forum were exhaustingly aware of my questions and explanations of what I intend to shoot.)

Brand new to DSLR with a 30d, my PRIMARY interest will be household, family events, indoors and outdoors. Certainly a kit lens will suffice for most of those situations. LONG-TERM, I'd like to get into amateur sports photography for older nephews being the team documenter and maybe, just maybe, earn some spare cash as I build a portfolio and reputation in their leagues/circles of friends. (Plenty of ideas here.) Also, with two little boys on the way, I LOVE some of the creative shots I see of children such as one very closeup profile where eyes of toddler are in focus and rest of face is somewhat soft. Great shot.

So, in order probably of what I'll shoot most, but not necessarily what I want to do most:
1) Family documenting (easiest but probably most priceless)
2) Creative shots of children, all ages, portraiture and spontaneous
3) Local, amateur sports photography
4) Spontaneous landscapes, cityscapes, downtown and country scenes as I drive around all day. (least important initially)

My initial focus will be closer up shots and I'm far from lazy. Not scared to let my feet do the zooming if needed. I'll walk to get a shot or move to get into position.

I WANT SPEED AND CLARITY mostly for objects within 15 feet. Most bang for my buck initially. Zoom to come later. Let's say kids and sports is highest priority. A lot of the sports will even allow me access to closeups, posed shots of batters, pitchers, basketball, skaters, bikers on ramps, etc. Most all of that, I'll have extreme access unlike trying to get more formal/professional access.

Open to idea of primes as I'm guessing they'll help me work on my positioning, composition, etc. Have already had one feedback that they are too limiting but certainly open to feedback from all types of shooters and all brands.




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Old Jul 29, 2006, 8:32 AM   #5
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Look at one of the f2.8 lenses in the 17-50 range. There are a lot of good ones at the moment. Sigma, Tamron and Tokina all do excellent and great value lenses in this range and canon has a new one that also has image stabilisation that is probably the best general-purpose lens available for the 30D (but is pretty expensive).
I wouldn't look at primes. The better zooms today are as good as primes of 20 years ago and unless there is a specific use you have in mind that no zoom can adequately cover (truly rectilinear wide angles and fish-eyes for example) there isn't really any reason to get one. The one exception is the canon 50mmf1.8 just 'cos it's so cheap and gives you something really fast to play with. You won't use it much though if you have an f2.8 zoom covering the same focal length.
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Old Jul 29, 2006, 10:18 AM   #6
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jacks wrote:
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I wouldn't look at primes. The better zooms today are as good as primes of 20 years ago and unless there is a specific use you have in mind that no zoom can adequately cover (truly rectilinear wide angles and fish-eyes for example) there isn't really any reason to get one. The one exception is the canon 50mmf1.8 just 'cos it's so cheap and gives you something really fast to play with. You won't use it much though if you have an f2.8 zoom covering the same focal length.
I absolutely agree with the above statements (just check the measured MTF's results on Phtozone)!!!
-> The only exception may be a Macro lens (which may double as a nice portrait lens)... :idea:
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