Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 31, 2006, 2:07 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
JohnReid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 734
Default

Hi everyone, I know this is o.t., but this is where I tend to get my most useful advice, so please help me out.

I recently decided to take the plunge and try macro photography quite seriously. I purchase the Sigma 150, Kenko extension tubes, reflectors and diffusors and wemberly plamps. I've come to the following conclusions:

- The Sigma is best for small insects. Trying to retain DOF in a flower for the entire flower is very difficult with this focal length, unless stopped down to at least F16, which then softens the shot due to diffraction. Therefore I use the 50mm with an extension tube for flowers.

- Working with a tripod becomes essential with such shallow DOF. This makes sneaking up on bugs very difficult and often results in missed shots.

I've come to the conclusion that for photos of insects, I need to work without a tripod, use a flash and stop the lens down quite a bit, but...

1. Even with a diffusor, how do you prevent the tell tale shadow or the shine caused by flash. Also, front lighting is not very flattering.

2. Even stopped down, if I move my head even a cm, the subject is out of focus, surely not everyone uses a tripod?
JohnReid is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 31, 2006, 5:52 AM   #2
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

What about two flash(es)? :-)
Isn't it like 'studio' lighting where one(or more) cancel out the other(s)?

-> Personally I mostly use one flash, but with the 150mm you don't have to get too close so the shadow tends to be behind the subject + I always pull the diffuser down so it can soften the shadow...
I rarely use a tripod and if you can position yourself so there's no background behind the subject then there's no surface for the shadow to land on!

NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2006, 6:04 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
JohnReid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 734
Default

Thanks NHL - Some very good points there.

One more question - what aperture are you generally using with the 150?
JohnReid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2006, 6:19 AM   #4
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

JohnReid wrote:
Quote:
One more question - what aperture are you generally using with the 150?
Good point - It depends...

I wanted to keep their natural color so I used 1/45s and the largest aperture(f/11) I can live with to be able to use fill-flash (all handheld of course) here: http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...amp;forum_id=7
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2006, 7:07 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
JohnReid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 734
Default

Nice shots NHL - Handholding at 1/45th of a second and getting such sharp shots is very impressive indeed.

I must say, out of all the photographic genre's, macro is one of the most difficult.
JohnReid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2006, 8:47 AM   #6
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

JohnReid wrote:
Quote:
Handholding at 1/45th of a second and getting such sharp shots is very impressive indeed.
Try it - The flash is what froze the 'handshake' even @ 1/30s! :idea:

-> @ close distance the flash duration is like several thousands of a second and much faster than any shutter speed set by the camera - The ambient light is what blur your subject so learn how to cut it back (one or two trial shots is all you need...)
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2006, 7:34 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Trique Daddi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 282
Default

NHL:

Those are stunning photos! I hope to make the Sigma 150 my first Macro at some point.

I wanted to thank you for the time and patience you invest here on the forum sharing your knowledge and experince with all of us. There aremanygreat peoplehere that save a lot of us time and money by reducing the number of "trial and error" mistakes that we make. It is appreciated!

Happy shooting!

Trique Daddi
Trique Daddi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2006, 7:38 PM   #8
Member
 
dougsmit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 90
Default



1. With macro distances, you can improve this by using a larger diffuser that extends almost as far out from the lens as the subject. This makes the light not from the front but from the top and looks more natural. You have to watch out that you don't hit the subject if it is one that would be scared off.

2. This is how you should focus with macro. Prefocus to get the scale and move your head (and camera) as needed to place the focus where you need it. Just push the button when you are sharp in the right place.

JohnReid wrote:
Quote:
1. Even with a diffusor, how do you prevent the tell tale shadow or the shine caused by flash. Also, front lighting is not very flattering.

2. Even stopped down, if I move my head even a cm, the subject is out of focus, surely not everyone uses a tripod?
dougsmit is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:19 PM.