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Old Aug 28, 2006, 7:49 AM   #11
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lundrog wrote:
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I just found out I was doing the primary picture taking at the second wedding two nights ago and I plan on meeting with them and getting more detail soon. I do know however that they want to do most of the pictures outdoors.
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The shots didn't turn out, in part I believe because my lens is so slow, I didn't have time to mess with shutter speed, and I did have it on ISO 100. I had wanted to see how my lens would perform under these conditions.

Basically, are there manual settings that I could have changed that would have made a huge difference here? If bumped up the ISO speed would it made a difference in most of these photos? Or is the kit lens jus that slow under low light? As I have stated earlier I am still learning the camera and most of the books I have do not have much information on shooting with low light.
Lundrog,

In the strongest possible way I urge you to reconsider being the primary photographer for the upcoming wedding. Your comments about using ISO 100, leaning on something rather than using a tripod and the angles used in your shots all indicate you have a long way to go before you are ready to be the primary wedding photographer. I don't mean this to be cruel - we all have to start somewhere and we all have to learn. But you don't have the experience yet - especially in this demanding area. And as a photographer you need to recognize your limits and not take on assignments you're not qualified to do.

Your shots show promise as snapshots of a wedding guest but they are far from where they need to be as a primary wedding photographer. It may be too late now because your friends are counting on you. But, I have to say you did your friends a great disservice by agreeing to be the primary photog for their once in a lifetime day. You let your ego get in the way and unfortunately it's going to cost THEM.

I don't mean to say no one should try wedding photography. But, you should have a good amount of experience with:

Depth of Field

Flash Photography (external)

Posed shots and portraiture

Low light, no flash photography

In addition you need the right equipment:

Tripod

External Flash

Fast Zoom - 70-200 2.8, 24-70 2.8

Faster prime - 135 2.0, 100 2.0 for church shots with no flash



I applaud the fact you want to learn wedding photography but am somewhat dismayed by your inability to restrain your ego in agreeing to shoot a wedding before you did your homework and gained at least related skills - even if they weren't in weddings, good experience in the above situations is a must.


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Old Aug 28, 2006, 8:08 AM   #12
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The couple that is getting married do not have the money for a pro. Otherwise I would not be taking these photos. They are not even having the wedding in a church, it is going to be in a reception hall, so I will take pictures outside.

I do have a flash, I just didn't use it to see what the lens would do.

I want to learn how to use my camera and how to be a better shooter, hence the reason I posted the pictures and asked these questions.

I attached a downsized croped pic I took in the bar with my flash, I thought it turned out ok.


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Old Aug 28, 2006, 2:56 PM   #13
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You owe them your best regardless of payment.Inside a reception hall.. I had excellent results with a tripod, 50mm 1.8 and 85mm 1.8.* Even then I shot raw and in some cases boosted the ISO to 400.* I found myslef wishing I had a 50mm 1.4.* I moved around, zooming with my feet but always mindful of the shutter speed.* I even asked people to hold a pose to ensure sharpness.* I also used shutter priority to drag the shutter for some flash shots but asked people not to move after they saw the flash.* Advice, get the fastest lens you can afford and if possible use a tripod.* Take multiple shots, shoot raw in case you need to "boost" the exposure later (Made lot's of saves with software and kept many at the 4x6 print level.)Good luck.
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Old Aug 29, 2006, 10:01 PM   #14
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I ordered the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II lens today from Onecall.com.

I think it will be a good lens, now I need to study up and practice some typical outdoor wedding poses.

Anyone know any sites / posts with examples?

After talking to the couple, I found out I had the wedding date wrong, it is on Sep 8[sup]th[/sup].
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Old Aug 31, 2006, 9:48 AM   #15
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Lundrog..

Just curious did you even read any of the posts????

R~




P.S. yes it does....
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Old Aug 31, 2006, 6:04 PM   #16
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the 2nd post said to get the lens I bought so doesn't that qualify?
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Old Sep 19, 2006, 8:47 AM   #18
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You've got some nice ideas, but the execution still needs some work.

Shot 1: biggest problem is no sparkle from the ring - you want to work the light so it reflects off the ring. You've also got some very uneven lighting - too hot at the top of the frame with fall-off at the bottom. That lighting issue more than anything detracts from the shot.

Shot 2: Again no sparkle on her ring and it's not presented toward the camera. Hot reflection off his ring from light or flash.

Shot 3: Nice idea for a shot. But it's underexposed and you've blown the sky. You picked better spots for some of your other outdoor shots so there isn't as much blown sky.

shot 4: very nice

shot 5: again, underexpoxed. But the biggest problem here is the groom. First, you can't see his face well do to the angle (and the underexposure) and he looks way too stiff. The other guy looks great.

shot 6: again, underexposed.

shot 7: underexposed but I like the composition.

Overall the biggest area for improvement is in exposure and flash work in these shots. You had some creative ideas for shots which I like. You just need more practice - especially with difficult exposure situation of a wedding (black tux and white dress).

As I recall, they weren't paying you for this wedding. Given that fact, I'm sure they'll be very happy with your shots. They shouldn't expect any better results for free. It's certainly better work than most of the other guests are going to be able to produce.
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Old Sep 19, 2006, 6:33 PM   #19
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JohnG,

Do you think most of these are technical settings on the camera, custom white bal, or exposure bracketing -1 0 and + 1 would have helped in these shots? or custom flash settings? over all lens quailty?

or more of a just know when to bump down expsure do to contrasts, what angles to shoot at and so forth that you learn from time shooting?

I thank you for telling me what is wrong with each shot. Since I am still learning and only did this to learn, would you be so kind to tell me what you would recommend do for each shot to improve them? That way next time in a situation like this, I can use that knowledge.


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Old Sep 19, 2006, 7:43 PM   #20
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Lundrog,

I don't do wedding photography. So I won't step outside my expertise to tell you how to better expose these types of shots. But, I don't need to be a wedding shooter to see a shot is underexposed. My suggestions would be extrapolations based upon the types of photography I do and that would be a disservice to you. You really should get first hand advice.

As for angles and such - if you aren't going to 'apprentice' to a seasoned pro, i would suggest looking at professional work and galleries of pros who do this type of work to get ideas. Kind of like me with sports shooting. If I'm going to photograph a sport I'm unfamiliar with I'll ask for advice and look at galleries to see the types of shots I like.

Best of luck to you. I would suggest posting in one of the photograph sections - there are also other forums which have specific wedding areas where you'd have a higher likelihood of getting well qualified answers.
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