Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 24, 2006, 8:30 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 31
Default

I bought a Digital Rebel XT hit, a speed light 430 , and a 4 gb flash card, and tripod a month ago.

I have two friends that want me to shoot their weddings due to lack of funds on their side.

This is happening this weekend and next weekend....

My question is, do I need another lens/lens for this wedding?

Now, I am not getting paid for this, but this is a hobby so I don't mind spending a little under 1k Max, under $500 if possible.

I am in the process of reading several books before this weekend....

But I want to make sure I can the best shots I can. I would like recommendations for lens, and since I am new I wouldn't mine explanations on the differences between my options. I did look at the forums and saw a few posts but like I said, I wouldn't mind to know why I should get an 85mm vs. a 50mm f1.4 ( example). I wonder if I should get a fixed lens or a variable please help me out.

Thanks
lundrog is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 24, 2006, 3:18 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Default

Hi Lundrog,

1: don´t do it (because the brides will hate you if the pics don´t turn out)!
2: don´t do it (because all the relatives will hate you, too) !
3: don´t do it (your friends will hate you, too - because pts. 1 + 2)
4: if you got to do it, absolutly (and by any means) get a second body (because if your XT fails, see pts. 1-3)
5: that said, I´ll recommend a 2,8 24-70mm zoom lens (Sigma should be in your range)for avaiable light shots troughout the ceremony, and, as there´s normaly not that much movement trough the ceremony also (for shots from greater distances) the Canon 70-300 IS usm. For real lowlight situations and portaits add the 1,8 50mm Canon - it´s good and cheap. I´m not familiar with the market prices where you live, but here these 3 lenses come about € 1000.- (together).
6: if you´re just going to photograph the party afterwards forget about pt. 5 - you should do fine with your kit-lens & flash.

Ciao, Wolfie
:-):-)
wolfie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2006, 4:12 PM   #3
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

lundrog wrote:
Quote:
I bought a Digital Rebel XT hit, a speed light 430 , and a 4 gb flash card, and tripod a month ago.
Have you had film SLR experience including flash work before owning the Rebel?

If not, and your experience is only with digicams and point and shoot film cameras then you have no business shooting a wedding with 1 month's practice. Sorry - you're just not qualified.

The fact that you're asking this question 2 days before one of the weddings also indicates you have no business doing the job.

Have I misread something and you have vast SLR experience in other genres - just not wedding? Or is this your first SLR.

Do I sound harsh? Yep, I probably do. But, as the other poster said you can't win if you only have a single month's experience. So, bail out. If that's the case and a pro wedding photog gave you his $20,000 kit of bodies, lenses and strobes you still wouldn't be able to do the job.

Again - sorry if I've misread and you have more experience than you let on.

John
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2006, 8:31 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 31
Default

More additional Info:

I also have a spare 1gb flash card, and a extra battery. For camera backup I have my Canon G5 plus four batteries and a 1 GB flash card.

I have shot around 1000 pictures since I have gotten the camera and have spent most of my time in P but fettled a little in each.

The wedding this weekend I am not the primary person taking photos. I hope to use the time to learn how my camera takes pictures in a church.

Since my current lens is 18-55 would I be better off getting an 85mm than the 50 mm?

I just found out I was doing the primary picture taking at the second wedding two nights ago and I plan on meeting with them and getting more detail soon. I do know however that they want to do most of the pictures outdoors.

I have owned my G5 since 2003 and have shot three weddings as backup with it. It normaly sucks without a tripod do the slow speed of the camera. One of the big reasons I got this camera was because of the speed and lens issiues of the G5 and because I wanted to broden my knowledge.

As i said I just found out about the 2nd wedding and I will make it clear for them not to expect much. What I want is to learn as much as I can from this and I want to make sure I have what is nessary to do that and to have a few pictures turn out, or so I hope.
lundrog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2006, 9:32 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Caboose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 625
Default

As a general rule the photographer should not go up any farther than the last person seated. Depending on the size of the venue and the group attending this may mean you need a long fast lens. Fast because flash is a big no, no during the ceremony. You are talking about some cash there though, a 70-200mm f/2.8 is going to set you back around $800 for the Sigma. But the long fast lens in not the best thing for the formal alter shots or the reception. Depending on the size of the wedding party you may need a wide angle lens, your kit lens may work fine here. But you will want at the very least a good hot shoe flash. Even the outdoor pictures may need the flash for fill light. The 24-70mm f/2.8 would be a good lens for the reception shots. Wolfie has the best suggestion though....don't do it. If there was ever a profession that Murphy's law applies to it would be wedding photography. Everything that can go wrong, will and you have to be prepaired for that. I've done 6 weddings and believe me that is 6 too many.
Caboose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 25, 2006, 2:33 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Default

Hi lundrog,
since you seem determined to do it, a few more tips (which - depending where you live - may or may not apply to you:

1: get a plan of the course of events ( the musicians should have one, otherwise they wouldn´t know when to play)
2: plan beforehand which shots you absolutly have to have
3: look at the church a couple of days before the event, preferably during the same time of day
3a: select your positions according to pt. 2 (so you won´t have to do that during the ceremony)
3b: get the sexton to switch on the lights as used through the ceremony (won´t do to shoot against the sun shining throug a window)and check your positions accordingly
3c: speak to the priest, in my experience it is often possible to get near bride & bridegroom during the changing of the rings. You better show a little knowledge of the rites involved - i.e. when photographing is absolutly no go (catholic: consecration or high prayer) or you can move around (everytime people are singing)
4: adapt your plan according to pt. 3
5: since you´ll have mixed light conditions (daylight, interior lights, candles) better shoot in RAW and sort it out afterwards in PS
6: I always use fast zoom lenses, since -as caboose wrote- flash is a no go. If you use a prime(the 85 mm for example) you´ll have to zoom with your feet - and a photographer always running backwards + forwards is at least as bad as a flashgun (caboose, I agree, a 2,8 70-200 would be better but I´ve got some good results with the new 70-300 IS USM, too)

Good luck,

Wolfie
wolfie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 25, 2006, 10:49 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
terry@softreq.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,539
Default

Possibly the largest problem you will have is directing the wedding party to get the "necessary" shots.

It takes a lot of hustle, confidence and leadership to get people together in groups to pose for the shots you need.

Don't be afraid to take several shots of each posed situation, as one or two will always be spoiled by blinking eyes or a misplaced facial expression.

I think your best bet is to volunteer for a professional weddding photographer asan upaid "grip" (basically you haul his or her equipment around for nothing).

As payback for thanklessly hauling their equipment around, the professional wedding photographer should give you tips regarding how to market yourself, how to "sell" to couples, how to get the "money" shots, etc. etc. etc.

Personally I think wedding photography is some of the most demanding photography going, I wouldn't venture into it without doing some unpaid, low expectation gigs first.

--- Terry


terry@softreq.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 27, 2006, 8:49 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 229
Default

I have done a couple of "Quincienera's" parties as a favor for friends. These "coming out" parties for young ladies have all the trappings of weddings. I assure you that what Terry says about "posing" people is the most difficult part of any event. You have to be assertive but "nice". Take lot's duplicates and if you have any problem with setting exposures I recommend using raw format. Also, take an assistant, they are envaluable to you and to the event. I survived the events butwouldn't do it for money unless I gained more experience.
Ctrack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 27, 2006, 1:15 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Default

Personally I think wedding photography is some of the most demanding photography going, I wouldn't venture into it without doing some unpaid, low expectation gigs first.

--- Terry

*
[/quote]

Hi, Terry,

I've got the impression that you kow what your'e talking about - nether the less - I´m thinking that things are different at your side of the pond. Maybe we should change views,

Ciao, Wolfie
wolfie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 28, 2006, 7:16 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 31
Default

Hi, I shot some photos this weekend using my Digital Rebel XT, with my Kit lens. It was my first time shooting any wedding photo's using this camera.

I found out that once the wedding started this weekend I couldn't use a flash and I didn't have room for a tripod, so I shot in program mode with no flash and tried to lean on something as much as I could.

The shots didn't turn out, in part I believe because my lens is so slow, I didn't have time to mess with shutter speed, and I did have it on ISO 100. I had wanted to see how my lens would perform under these conditions.

Basically, are there manual settings that I could have changed that would have made a huge difference here? If bumped up the ISO speed would it made a difference in most of these photos? Or is the kit lens jus that slow under low light? As I have stated earlier I am still learning the camera and most of the books I have do not have much information on shooting with low light.

I got some good pictures with my flash and outdoors just not in the church/reception with no flash.

http://r0ger.homedns.org:11000

On the link I have downscaled a Jpeg and also included a CR2 raw for option download if you wanted to see the Shooting information for each picture. You might want to look at the raw to really see the picture. You'll have to put up with my 256K upload J


Thanks again.
lundrog is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:12 AM.