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Old Dec 24, 2006, 1:52 PM   #1
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Need your help.

Ilike to usemy new A630 for taking indoor night shots of people without all those color dots (noise) and do not want to carry a tripod with me either. I do not mind doing some post processing and noise reduction with software.

I noticed that A630 gives 5 options for automatic or semi-automatic night shots.Any recommendation on which one is the best?

1) Auto (what ISO would it use? EXIF does not say)

2) P with "High ISO" selection (Do not know what ISO range it actually uses)

3) Night Scene (on the dial)

4) SCN + Night Snapshot. Noticed faster shutter speed

5) SCN+Indoor. Noticed some color correction

Any other combinations?

Thanks

Anour

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Old Dec 26, 2006, 1:46 PM   #2
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Since I did not hear any responses, I decided to do a test, although not very scientific. Attached is an image that shows the test result for a situation where objects are far from flash or flash cannot be used and no tripod is available. I am interested in the results for night photography but did the test withlow daylight. All images have gone through:

1) automatic contrast adjustment for individual shot (paint shop pro)

2) Digital camera noise filter with default settings

3) Size reduction to be uploadable

I reached the following conclusions for Canon A630 but please correct meif these conclusions maynot be generalizeable:

1)Should not use theAUTO on A630 without flash regardless of high or normalISO choice. It has poor quality and high noise

2) The "P" selection with VIVID colors gives the best image (for the seleted test)

3) The SCN-INDOOR is the next best selection

4) With "P" and using ISO 80 to 800P, ISO200 appears to have the least NET NOISE after filtering

5) The NIGHT selection is just too slow to be used without a tripod (not included)

Am I correct in reaching these conclusions?

Thanks

Anour


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Old Dec 26, 2006, 6:31 PM   #3
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If your primary use for the camera is low-light, indoor shooting sans flash and no tripod, the Canon A630 is not the best choice. Fuji F30 would be the way to go. But there isn't really a compact point-n-shoot that does a great job with this.
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Old Dec 26, 2006, 8:00 PM   #4
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Flippedgazzel

Thanks for the comment. I debated quite a bit among F30, A630 and A710 and, thanks to many comments including yours in the Forum, was aware of F30's superior low light . However, all things considered, Ifinally decided to buy A630. Given what I have, I was trying to knowthe best low-light setting as A630 offers a least 5 semi-automatic settings for this purpose. Unless someone knows otherwise, I plan to use its "P-High ISO-Vivid" combination for night shots in large rooms. If available, I can use a tripod with the same setting.

Thanks again

Anour
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Old Dec 26, 2006, 8:31 PM   #5
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Hi Anour,

Well, if you are set for using the A630 for night/indoor shooting, and have access to a tripod or other steady service, try this:

For shooting an inanimate (non living or moving) subject...

1. Go to "M" - Manual mode
2. Set ISO to 100 or lower. The lower the ISO, the cleaner the image.
3. Set the Shutter to something long - perhaps even several seconds.
4. Set the timer to 2 seconds. This way the vibration from having pressed the shutter button will have subsided by the time the picture is snapped.

If the subject is a human or animal, a long shutter speed may not work, as even slight motion - such as breathing - will cause the photo to blur to varying degrees. In this case, increase the shutter speed to under a second, and increase the ISO.

I believe the LCD display on the camera will let you know when you have good exposure compensation. Don't be afraid to underexpose a bit (say, -1/3 EV) so you can use a faster shutter, especially if you are taking a handheld shot. Since you are comfortable with post-processing, you can brighten up the too-dark areas a bit.

Chris
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Old Dec 27, 2006, 1:11 PM   #6
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Thanks Chris

I will give it a try.

Anour
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