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Old Feb 7, 2007, 6:22 PM   #1
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Has anyone else noticed or been annoyed by this issue? Whether in AUTO or a manually set ISO, the information is not recorded in the standard exif format with the jpg. Hence, when viewing file properties outside of Zoombrowser, the ISO is not available.

Also, somewhat related, even in Zoombrowser, the ISO is not recorded when in AUTO ISO mode; it just says AUTO. Very annoying. All other cameras I've had way back to my Nikon Coolpix 775 from around 2001 recorded the ISO chosen by the camera.

I've contacted Canon and they've noted my issue. Hopefully, they'll fix it in a firmware update.
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Old Feb 7, 2007, 11:22 PM   #2
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This is a Canon "feature" for a long time and it doesn't seem likely that they'll fix it. However you can display the chosen ISO with Irfanview if you use Irfanview's most recent Exif.dll plugin. If you have selected ISO=auto unfortunately only "auto" is displayed as the ISO value.
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Old Feb 8, 2007, 2:17 AM   #3
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As long as I have tried, neither the latest Irfanview plugins v.397, nor the latest Zoom Browser v5.8 show the ISO if shooted in Auto/Scene modes.
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Old Feb 8, 2007, 3:24 PM   #4
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Marinjo wrote:
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As long as I have tried, neither the latest Irfanview plugins v.397, nor the latest Zoom Browser v5.8 show the ISO if shooted in Auto/Scene modes.
If you use a scene mode, the iso is set to auto. Consequently Irfanview reports the rather useless "iso=auto". I would recommend to set the mode dial to "P" (for beginners) or Av (for more experienced users) and set the iso to 80 or 100. In this way you get the best image quality. Because the A710 tends to slight overexposure I also set exposure compensation to -1/3. I have never used a scene mode and I only set iso to auto if I need a wider flash range.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 1:56 AM   #5
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kassandro wrote:
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Because the A710 tends to slight overexposure I also set exposure compensation to -1/3.
kassandro, I just tried your advice to justify for myself once more- the exposure compensation takes no action at all, if the camera has the Flash fired (the Flash is in On or Auto position). My 2 test shots with exposure compensation set to -2 and to +2showed exactly the same settings in EXIF, the histogram was the same, as were the pictures. So the exp. compensation works only when shooting with Flash off. But most of the time you have to use Flash when shooting indoors with only ambient light- when I switch the flash off, the camera's exposure meter forces the shutter to 0"4, which is low even with IS on.
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Old Feb 10, 2007, 3:59 PM   #6
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Marinjo wrote:
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kassandro, I just tried your advice to justify for myself once more- the exposure compensation takes no action at all, if the camera has the Flash fired (the Flash is in On or Auto position). My 2 test shots with exposure compensation set to -2 and to +2showed exactly the same settings in EXIF, the histogram was the same, as were the pictures. So the exp. compensation works only when shooting with Flash off. But most of the time you have to use Flash when shooting indoors with only ambient light- when I switch the flash off, the camera's exposure meter forces the shutter to 0"4, which is low even with IS on.
For the flash the A710 - like many other cameras - has an additonal exposure compensation menu. However, if the flash is only used to add light to shadows, then also the ordinary exposure compensation is used for those parts of the picture where the flash has no substantial effect, i.e. the more distant parts. That is the sole reason, why there are two exposure compensation menus. I personally use the flash of the A710 only rarely. Because of only two batteries it takes quite some time to recharge the flash.
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Old Feb 11, 2007, 4:43 AM   #7
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OK, kassandro. Now I made 2 indoor shots in P mode, the Flash in Auto, ISO 100, no Exposure compensation. The flash exposure compensation was set to -2 and to +2 subsequently. The second picture was noticebly brighter, but the EXIF data were the same. Does that mean that the only thing the Flash compensation does is adjusts the Flash power (what can else make one picture brighter given the all settings are the same)?
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Old Feb 11, 2007, 12:34 PM   #8
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Yes, the the camera controls the strength of the flash. If you set flash exposure compensation to to something positive, the flash becomes more intense. It does not effect the brightness of the objects, which are too far away for the flash. To alter the brightness of these objects you have to use the ordinary exposure compensation.
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