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Old May 21, 2007, 9:28 AM   #11
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Both are on automatic mode. Please do write to the consumer association. If Canon is not willing to admit and refund my money.. I will file a formal complaint the Office of consummer protection. Also I did a Test with Nikkon L1 but I dont have the pics with me anymore... the L1 doesnt have any white spots.... pictures were taken in the same exact conditions 2 sec appart. I will be updating this site with what Canon has to say about this problem.. up to now all the email answers were 'dust spots'... so I guess Canon enginnered a camera that is prone to take pictutes of dust in the air!!! What I find really strange is that cheaper model of other compagnies dont do that at all... bottom line I dont find that its normal to pay that much and not be able to rely on a cam that does such a thing...
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Old May 21, 2007, 10:01 AM   #12
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Look here to see the same issue with a Nikon Coolpix
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/read...;opinion=35354 I am looking to buy a new compact digital but the possibility of the same effect is worrying. Some, like Ricoh, place the flash further away from the lens. One or two have a pop up flash. I wonder if that helps?

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Old May 21, 2007, 5:10 PM   #13
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One theory might be that the smaller the lens the bigger the problem... cause I only encountered this problem with the Casio S770... which is a ultra compact... like the sd800.. the sd800 as the worst white spots problem ever... If you went with a bigger model like a compact kodak c875 has great reviews in the consummer reports mag.. and its the fraction de price of any of these cameras.. check it out!
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Old May 21, 2007, 5:38 PM   #14
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That's certainly another consideration.
Some particular configuration of geometry has been going through my mind also:- lens diameter, projection from body, position of flash, maximum aperture, widest angle (equal to say 28mm, 35mm or 50mm for an slr), size of optical sensor, type of lens on the flash etc.
It's the randomness of the spots that I find intriguing - in number, position and size although they all seem perfectly round.
Another test to do would be to take 2-3 shots of the same scene in rapid succession - if it's dust the spots should move, if it's reflections they should stay the same. Would need to use a tripod to be sure.
I have this evening sent a letter to the Consumers Association (UK) asking for their comments.
Thanks for the mention of the Kodak - I wasn't aware of that one.

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Old May 21, 2007, 7:01 PM   #15
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I have just done my own 'dust test'.
Set my Canon A85 on Auto on a tripod in the bedroom and took some flash pics at widest angle and half zoomed, as was and after shaking a t shirt around the room.
Guess what? Before shaking the t shirt the picture was OK but afterwards showed up the halos and their size and position was time dependent.
Thus I guess what we are seeing is dust related.
The question then is why have Canon etc made cameras that are so good at detecting dust whereas Fuji seem to not have this problem? (unless you know otherwise).
I'll not be buying another Canon compact camera.
I shall be looking in the shops tomorrow for the Kodak Z885 (better ISO rating than the C875 so less need for flash) and doing a dust test in the shop before I buy - wonder if the shop will object?

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Old May 22, 2007, 1:18 AM   #16
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Make shure you google this... Kodak z885 and white spots to see if theres anyone that reported this.... also, some cameras will show one or two dust spots if you shake a broom in front of it... I think that would be normal not 20-30 dust spots... let me know how your shoopin and test went...
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Old May 24, 2007, 9:16 AM   #17
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After Writting a letter (registered)and the shop owner... I got a call and I will be refunded... So for all those not satisfied with your product dont stop after your first no.. write write write.. it takes time but it sure worth it!!!!
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Old May 27, 2007, 3:00 PM   #18
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My reply from Canon today about this issue was
Dear Customer,
Thank you for your recent enquiry regarding your Canon product.
In response to your query, please be advised that is normal to have white spots on the pictures in case they were taken in low light with a high ISO. This phenomenon is called noise. The problems you are experiencing are also influenced by the shooting conditions (e.g. if the subject is outside the flash's range).

You don't need high ISO and subject out of range to see this!
Bye Bye Canon - I have purchased 3 cameras from you in the past but your standards, quality control, design and customer responses show that it is time to move on.:sad:



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Old May 28, 2007, 4:38 PM   #19
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What I love is the: its normal! Sentence... it kills me... now with the kodak c875 I dont get white spots so its not normal.. remember always send registered mail... I spent 3 times with emails with them! Same blah blah blah... normal white spots... Canon has developped such a sophisticated camera that it takes not only the picture of dust but if you look closely you can see photons also!
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Old May 31, 2007, 1:38 PM   #20
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Just to update you with the fact that today I went into a photo processing facility and quizzed one of the operators.
I showed her some of my recent pictures which had many 'dust halos' and she was horrified since, of the millions of pictures she sees, a few % show this phenomenon but only 1 or 2 spots - I get a dozen or so most times I use flash in a social setting. She then informed me that she had a Canon digital camera which started to show white spots when using flash and she sent it back under warranty - apparently the sensor was replaced. Since then her camera has been fine. That suggests to me that the sensor was being ultrasensitive (perhaps in the UV range). If Canon's explanation about dust were correct then they would not have been able to fix it.
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