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Old Jul 29, 2007, 12:50 AM   #11
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slipe wrote:
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If you bought the camera locally and can exchange it you would probably do better with the Canon A570 IS with a stabilized lens. It is in the same price range as your A630. With stabilization you should be able to shoot somewhere around 1/5 second in wide, and if you hold it really steady you might get by with 1/3. The only other alternative is to crank up the ISO as kassandro suggests.

I bought the A570is for my daughter last week. The OIS (optical image stabilization) works well, and I was able, using the light of a bright lamp, to take sharp macro shots of her necklaces.

--Steve

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Old Jul 29, 2007, 12:51 AM   #12
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Over all the photo is pretty good. Taken medium low light. I'm in focus but the back grounds not.. what settings wouldI need to fix that?
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Old Jul 29, 2007, 12:53 AM   #13
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Very low light.. best wide angleI have taken so far.. to me the levels look good with minimal blur and no noise.
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Old Jul 29, 2007, 12:55 AM   #14
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Up close, taken in over cast sun lighting.
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Old Jul 29, 2007, 4:14 PM   #15
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The first two of the new pics were again shot with a very low shutter speed. Probably they will also be slightly blurred at full resolution. Due to downsizing they look sharp. The last picture was shot with a very fast shutter speed 1/1250 of a second. However it is not really sharp especially at full resolution, because the focus is not correct. When making close ups the DOF is quite small, especially if you use aperture 2.8. Thus you can quickly get a misfocus by moving a little after focusing. For macro shots you should definitely use a tripod, the selftimer and a higher aperture value for a larger DOF. To small DOF is also the reason why the background is not sharp in the b&w picture.

The A570 is certainly a good camera but I would not exchange the A630 for it. The 1/1.8" sensor of the A630 is considerably larger than the 1/2.5" sensor of the A570 and that clearly results in better image quality, if pictures are not blurred by shake. I have posted five full resolution pics of a A630, which I could test for a weekend, in this thread:
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=15
That thread clearly shows that the A630 is a very good camera if there is sufficient light. You seem to have quite a steady hand, whence the image stabiliser of the A570 is not that necessary for you. While the first 3 pictures would certainly be better with an IS, they would not be completely sharp either. After all an IS cannot do wonders. Unlike the A570 the A630 has a great flip out display, which clearly enhances creativity. Finally the A630 has 4 batteries, whence you have a much more powerful flash with shorter cycle time. Finally the CHDK hack can be used with the A630 but not the A570. While the CHDK hack is nothing for beginners, it adds incredible new features to the A630. Thus you really can grow with your A630, if you want. I already own the very similar A640 and I just ordered an A630, to have a second CHDK camera anb because it is so darn cheap. Actually it costs less than the A560 here, which is really rediculous.
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Old Jul 29, 2007, 4:43 PM   #16
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Thank you kassandro for all your help. What would you suggest isa good shutter speed range for the lower lighting. I realize that these settings will change with the lighting... but just generally speakingwhat's a safe range to use?

The photos you posted are beautiful.. I know this cameras more than capable of getting great photos. AsI amquickly finding out its definitely a trial and error process.

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Old Jul 30, 2007, 9:41 AM   #17
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Don't ditch your A630, it is capable of taking fine pictures. When the light level low, there is no "safe" shutter speed to reduce blur. Noise is a big issue with all compact digital cameras, so you are pretty much stuck with an upper limit of ISO 100 if you want to keep noise down, ISO 80 would be even better. Even with a wide open aperture at f 2.8, you will find that in low light situations like overcast days, especially in shady woods, that there is just no way that the shutter speed can be fast enough for hand-holding the camera. Rather that buying a camera with image stabilization, you would be better off buying a tripod. There's a reason why professsional photogs use tripods all the time - to reduce camera shake!

You mentioned wanting the background trees in focus in the portrait of you. For that you would need a small aperture, to give you lots of depth of field (how deep into the photo will things appear sharp). A small aperture, like f8, will give you more depth of field, but will cut out a lot of light. There is an inverse relationship between aperture value and aperture diameter, so that a high aperture value like f8 will give you a small diameter, which reduces the amount of light. A small aperture value like f2.8 will give you a large aperture diameter, allowing more light to enter the camera, but giving you a shallow depth of field. If you took a picture of two people standing one in front of the other, and focused on the person in front with a wide open aperture, f2.8, the person in front would be sharp and the person in back would be blurry.

A tripod will also be valuable for your clothing photography. You should be able to get clear pictures of the fabric by handholding the camera and using flash, but you will lose texture in the fabric as the front lighting from the flash will make the subject look very flat. Try this instead, set the camera on a tripod and adjust tripod and product placement so that your subject is properly framed. Don't leave the camera at the widest focal length, zoom in a little as you get some distortion at the wide end of the zoom. Place an incandescent light of to the side of the camera, at about 45 degrees relative to the camera and the subject (i.e. take a lamp with a regular bulb, remove the lampshade, and set the lamp off to the side). Set the camera white balance to incandescent, set ISO to 80, set camera to aperture priority, set a middle aperture, about f 5.6, make sure the flash is turned off, and use the self timer to take a picture. Take a couple of pictures since you have gone through all the trouble to set it up and you want to make sure that the camera focuses properly on the subject.
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