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Old Mar 31, 2008, 10:13 PM   #11
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Okay. I need to install my software. Since we are fixing to go to bed I may only be able to post the pictures I have recently taken. My light tent is still in storage and I need to go into the garage and pull it from one of the closets there.
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Old Mar 31, 2008, 11:12 PM   #12
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Here are some of my first pics I took when I bought this camera:

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c1...4/IMG_0017.jpg

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c1...4/IMG_0041.jpg


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Old Apr 1, 2008, 8:22 AM   #13
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Sarah,

What ISO did you use on your indoor photo of Bradley? Perhaps the picture wasn't too sharp because noise reduction smeared the details.
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Old Apr 1, 2008, 8:55 AM   #14
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Andy...when you say "Smeared the details"....what does that mean? I do not have that eye that many of you professional photographers have. Did you see the pics I posted? Are they bad?
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Old Apr 1, 2008, 8:55 AM   #15
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Andy and Roni-

That photo of Bradley is why I mentioned the photo was not "DSLR sharp." The camera was on Auto ISO and went to ISO 400, so yes, you you can see some fine detail smearing caused by the NR (Noise Reduction). Noise Reduction is automatically applied by the camera's processor, so it is a function that you do not have control over. As the ISO is numerically increased speckling begins to show up in the photo. We refer to that speckling as "noise." The camera's processor also automatically recognizes noise in a photo. When the camera's processor applies NR it gets rid of the noise but at a cost. Some of the fine detail in your photo gets reduced or "smeared" as we refer to it. So NR takes place and we loose some of the fine detail in our photo. That is why we alway try to use the lowest possible ISO setting for our photos. Based on my own limited experience with the SX-100, it asppears that we will probably not see the effect of NR and fine detail smearing if we work to keep the ISO set at ISO 200 and below. We will continue to watch our photos to see if that limit is correct.

The other factor that comes into play is this: The SX-100 is harder to hold dead still with extended arms. If you brace an elbow, or brace against my leg, as when I was taking the camera and flash photo things become much easier and therefore sharper as well. Roni, that is why Bill Drew mentioned to you that because of the slow shutter speeds you might have when working with the light tent, a tripod will most probably be necessary. In just my one day experience with the camera I found that by a little bracing, my pictures became sharper because I minimized the camera movement.

Paint Shop Pro 9.0 is a very good photo editing program.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 1, 2008, 9:23 AM   #16
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ISO Setting.

What and where is that on my camera? My camera has all this mumbo jumbo stuff on the LCD Monitor to me.
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Old Apr 1, 2008, 9:33 AM   #17
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Roni-

Now let's chat about the two sample photos that you took last night. Both appear to show some blurring that came from camera movement. In theory the camera has to be motionless when the picture is taken.

I took the photo of the Red Hot Poker blooms at around 6:45pm. The light was falling off rapidly. So I braced my elbow on the deck rail out on our back deck, as I took the photo. That was a little "insurance" that I appilied because when I pushed half way down on the shutter release to allow the camera to focus, I read right on the LCD (remember I was in the "P" for Programed Auto Mode) the aperture and shutter speed that the camera was going to use for the photo. If I remember correctly, the readout was F 2.8 at 1/20th, which is a low shutter speed.

That very same technique would have helped on both of your photos which were done in the evening with the light deminishing quickly. So please think of it this way. My Red Hot Poker photo and your blossom and deer photos were taken in very similiar lighting conditions. I braced my elbow and got a sharp photo. Because your camera was extended in your arms you got a tiny bit of camera movement. But that was enough camera movement to blur your photos a bit.

Now I had also better mention that if you do put the camera on a tripod, the IS has to be turned off. It is just 7:00am here, so there is not enough light outside yet for good photos so I will take some photos this morning to illustrate what I am speaking about here.

(1) Please take all of your photos with the Mode Selector on top of the camera in the "P" position, which stands for Programed Auto.

(2) When the camera to subject distance is at, or less than 30" use your Macro Mode which is on the four way controller on the back of the camera.


To help you learn a bit faster, we will standardize our camera setup with a few rules like the two just above.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 1, 2008, 10:36 AM   #18
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Thanks Sarah..the ABC version is much easier for me to comprehend. I figure after I learn that then I can move further to the in depth stuff.
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Old Apr 1, 2008, 11:48 AM   #19
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Roni-

Let's chat about tripods. IS is good, but it does not replace a tripod. There are just times when your shutter speed is so slow that a tripod is necessary. Remember that is why we place the Mode Selector in the "P" Mode so that we can see the aperture and shutter speed that the camera has selected when we press halfway down on the shutter release to allow the camera to focus.

The only requirement of a tripod is that it be study and steady enough so that when yoush down on your camera's shutter release, you don't get any camera movement. You do not have to spend $300.00 for a tripod as Bill Drew suggested. Just find a sturdy and steady tripod.

In the photo, you will see a tripod that I use around home. I paid $35.00 back in 1956. That was expensive then but you can see, I got my money's worth because I am still using it. When we fly to a cruise ship to give our lectures, I pack a much lighter tripod that fits inside my suitcase.

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Old Apr 1, 2008, 12:13 PM   #20
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OK, Roni-

Let's move into taking Macro photos of your hair clips. Looking at the attached photo you can see that I have placed a small match box on the top of the tripod closest to the closet door. You can also see that I have the SX-100 on the second tripod which is about 6 feet in front of the tripod with the match box on it.

That is the setup that we are going to use for our lesson in using zoom Macro

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