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Old Aug 9, 2008, 11:10 PM   #1
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I still do not have a Canon S-5 camera to use. However, I will begin tonight by using the Canon Ex-430 Flash ( a really great and very dependable flash unit) with the Canon G-7 camera. Your results would be very similar with the Canon G-9 camera. However, the G-7 is as far as the budget can now extend.

The Canon EX-430 Flash is also the preferred flash for the Canon S-5 camera as well. Tonight, we will look only at straight on the camera direct external flash. I used the P for Program Mode, Auto ISO, on the G-7 and some minus Flash Compensation (EV-1.3) because I was shooting fairly close to my husband, at about 8 feet.

That tells you that the Canon EX-430 Flash can easily extend your flash range out to 20 to 30 feet feet with no problems at all. If you are willing to increase your ISO settings somewhat, that Flash Range can even be extended out to 40 to 50 feet. That is the kind of flash that you might want to use in typical sporting events, school plays, dance and musical recitals.

So here is the Canon EX-430 Flash Tutorial #1: Direct on the camera flash. Our photo sample shows both good exposure control on the Canon G-7, as we would have also be able to do on the Canon S-5, sharpness is preserved, and WB is well under control. This is the most common application of the Canon EX-430 flash unit. This will be your most often used application of external flash on the Canon G-7, G-9, or S-5.

I am happy to handle any and all questions that you might have about this particular flash appliacation. In our follow-on postings, we will handle bounce flash, macro or close-up photos, and using diffusers in close-up situations.

Sarah Joyce

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Old Aug 13, 2008, 1:11 AM   #2
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Great Sarah but i too set the 430EX at ETTL and when i shoot in P mode my shutter speed is at 1/60, but when i set to AV or TV my shutter speed are way to slow thanks.
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Old Aug 13, 2008, 9:39 PM   #3
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Hercules-

I have already answered your question earlier. If you set your Mode Selector on the "TV" mode, and then use your Command Dial, you can select your shutter speed to whatever speed speed you might desire as long as you are in the "Auto ISO" setting.

I experimented for over an hour today with our Canon XT DSLR camera to be perfectly sure.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 13, 2008, 11:18 PM   #4
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mtclimber wrote:
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Hercules-

I have already answered your question earlier. If you set your Mode Selector on the "TV" mode, and then use your Command Dial, you can select your shutter speed to whatever speed speed you might desire as long as you are in the "Auto ISO" setting.

I experimented for over an hour today with our Canon XT DSLR camera to be perfectly sure.

Sarah Joyce
Thanks Sarah, when i set the command dial to whatever shutter speed my aperture starts to blink does that matter? also my 450D has auto ISO but i don't think your XT does
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Old Aug 13, 2008, 11:27 PM   #5
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Hercules-

No, I am a bit out of date. My Canon XT DSLR camera does not have "Auto ISO." But none the less, when the camera is placed into the "TV" mode on the Mode Selector. By using the Command Dial, you can select the shutter speed of your choice.

However, when your selected shutter speed begins to blink at you, it is telling you that you have gone beyond the limits of your ISO selection. So Hercules, what shutter speed are you REALLY looking for?

As I demonstrated to you this afternoon (13 August 3pm local time) I was easily able to dial in a shutter speed of 1/250th of a secon, with my ISO selection at ISO 400.

So you should really not have any problem at all in achieving 1/250th of a second shutter speed. That is actually more shutter speed than you really need in most cases. Am I missing something??

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 13, 2008, 11:31 PM   #6
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mtclimber wrote:
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Hercules-

No, I am a bit out of date. My Canon XT DSLR camera does not have "Auto ISO." But none the less, when the camera is placed into the "TV" mode on the Mode Selector. By using the Command Dial, you can select the shutter speed of your choice.

However, when your selected shutter speed begins to blink at you, it is telling you that you have gone beyond the limits of your ISO selection. So Hercules, what shutter speed are you REALLY looking for?

As I demonstrated to you this afternoon (13 August 3pm local time) I was easily able to dial in a shutter speed of 1/250th of a secon, with my ISO selection at ISO 400.

So you should really not have any problem at all in achieving 1/250th of a second shutter speed. That is actually more shutter speed than you really need in most cases. Am I missing something??

Sarah Joyce
Well in my house with ISO set to 800 my shutter speed is at 1/15 anything more my aperture starts to blink, but i haven't tried auto ISO yet, so i don't know maybe i need to turn on more lights in my home.
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Old Aug 14, 2008, 12:36 AM   #7
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Hercules-

My dear friend, please listen closely. Put your ISO setting to "Auto ISO" as the very first step. Then, place your Mode Selector to the "TV" mode. Now using your Command Dial, select just 1/125th of a second.

That should not be a problem, now using the Canon EX-430 with your camera, take the photo, you should have a shutter speed of 1/125th of a second.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 14, 2008, 12:52 AM   #8
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mtclimber wrote:
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Hercules-

My dear friend, please listen closely. Put your ISO setting to "Auto ISO" as the very first step. Then, place your Mode Selector to the "TV" mode. Now using your Command Dial, select just 1/125th of a second.

That should not be a problem, now using the Canon EX-430 with your camera, take the photo, you should have a shutter speed of 1/125th of a second.

Sarah Joyce
I will try auto ISO today Sarah, let me explain now without the 430EX flash, if i was to say set my shutter speed at 1/125th in my home and have the aperture setting blinking on and off, if i was to take that picture i would have a dark photo i would need to lower the shutter speed till the aperture setting stops blinking to get a good exposed picture right? isn't this true for the 430EX attached to the camera? sorry for all the questions




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Old Aug 14, 2008, 4:33 AM   #9
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Hercules, flash or no flash if in Tv and things are too dark for the camera to get an accurate exposure then you will get a blinking aperture value.

For all my indoor flash work I use manual exposure settings..... well the only time I wouldn't is if I'm in a very well illuminated venue and then I can go for Av. For me using Tv is not giving enough control as I'm not setting the aperture so dof could be all over the place.

When using Av with flash attached then the camera will set the shutter speed to give a balanced exposure of the closer subject as well as the background (ambient light). This is where you can get the slower shutter speeds when lighting is low.

I also never use auto ISO as again this takes control away from the photographer. So then what do you need to do when shooting manual with flash.

Lets assume you want a balance exposure then you will need to set the shutter speed, ISO and aperture so that the metering is saying you are exposed correctly and then the flash will fill in nicely. Now this can be pretty slow shutter speeds as already stated, but....... the flash is going to be helping out by freezing the main subject so not always an issue. Usually when shooting a wedding or party where I want some ambient light as well as flash I will under expose a little with the settings then the flash will have more of a freezing effect, so I'm often working with shutter speeds of 1/15th and under exposure but 2/3 (or similar... it depends on the effect I'm looking for). Now working in manual exposure modes you can then increase the shutter speed to what you desire but obviously this will mean under exposure to the background but this is not always an issue. Yes, you can do this in Tv, but if you do then you will always be at the widest aperture for the lens which is not always desirable.

Take this shot as an example, if I had shot with a high shutter speed the background would be black, if shooting with Tv I couldn't have closed down the aperture a little to get a wider dof so they are both sharp (ok so here it's only closed to f5.6 as I was using a wide angle), so give yourself the control and get practising with settings away from the auto ones.If I had used Av then the shutter would have been a lot lower to make the background exposure better, as I selected to under expose as I wanted some detail but not all as it helps to separate the subject.




So P mode can work fine and so can Av and Tv, but if you have invested in a good flash I would invest the time in learning to control the settings to get even better shots.


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Old Aug 14, 2008, 10:59 AM   #10
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Thanks, Mark-

That is an excellent explanation and a nice sample photo as well. If you have no objection, I would like to incorporate your tips into the Flash Tutorial as well. I have stressed using Auto ISO as a way to get users started who are just beginning with an external flash. But you have covered thing so nicely, I feel those tips should also be incorporated as we move toward the end of the Canon EX-430 Flash Tutorial.

Sarah Joyce
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