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Old Dec 22, 2003, 8:00 PM   #11
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Tried a Sony P10 today. It does not have as much Red Eye as the A80, but it is still there. I haven't had a chance to try it in any settings outside of my house yet. It seems that the small camera is just not gonna do it for me.

I'm not wild about it other wise. Feels like a Playschool toy. Dont like the Memory stick and proprietary battery either. The shutter button has a vague feel to it. Dont like the feel of the camera in general. I wont be keeping it.

So what am I supposed to do? I guess I have to get into a larger camera. Maybe one with a hot shoe.

As far as it being just mine and my friends camera...a Google search says this about Canon and Red Eye...

Quote:
liked the camera, the size, features, and the Controls, but I returned camera due to red eye problems. My kids have blue or green eyes, and 50%+ of flash pictures had significant red eye problems. I also tried an A60 we have at work, and it had the same red eye problems.

What were the faults? Poor auto-focus (AF), slow repeated shooting, and excessive red eye.

(S 400) Cons: Even though the reviews say this camera has good red-eye reduction, I still get red-eye in over half of my pics. I realize that this is a common problem with compacts

The S45 comes equipped with an AF lamp to assist auto-focus in low-light situations. But the flash is positioned quite close to the lens, which leads to red-eye shots. The unit ships with a 32MB

(A70) The are only 2 problems I have: 1)the red eye reduction doesn't work very well and 2)

(A70 Speaking of which, there is red-eye galore, even with the red eye reduction setting turned on.

(A70) the only I can think of is that I tend to get red-eye a little more often then I'd like,

(A70) Red eye a problem, not the prettiest camera but solid to hold

(A80) Some chromatic aberration (purple fringing), red eye issues, minor image softness

etc....

[/quote]
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Old Dec 23, 2003, 1:56 AM   #12
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As I have told my girlfriend many a time, there's a reason why they call it redeye REDUCTION, not ELIMINATION. The function only reduces, in some cases, the redeye effect. As long as you do not get the flash tube away from the lens axis, you run the risk of redeye every time. Use a camera with a hot shoe, buy a separate flash and see how the problem pretty much disappears.

If you are using a camera with a built-in flash, your best bet is to shoot it at it's widest lens setting. Zoom into the tele range and redeye is a forgone conclusion- no way around it. Even with a shoe-mount flash, if you start zooming into a tele range you need to use an off-camera cord and get the flash even further away. Using a bracket and off camera cord with a shoe-mount flash is the ONLY way to assure yourself of redeye-free photos every time.
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Old Dec 24, 2003, 8:59 AM   #13
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Thanks for the reply Greg. You are correct about using the zoom. If I dont use the zoom, it is much better. Problem is I often cant get the 3'- 4' away from a subject to get the shot I want. Sometimes it is a group of people which also makes that difficult. I need to use the zoom fairly often.

Today I will be trying out a friends Olympus C4000z. I've seen other pics he has taken and he has very little problems with red eyes in his pics (almost none). It is a little bigger than the A80, but that is a trade off I am willing to make. The flash on the C4000z has more distance from the lens than the typical compact cam. The C4000z also has an option for an external flash, which the A80 does not.
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Old Dec 25, 2003, 3:12 AM   #14
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I've tried yesterday night my A70 in lighting conditions similar to yours, sjm - the same problem, bad red eyes, so it seems to be typical for these cameras. Fortunately, I don't take this kind of photos often, but it would be interesting to know which camera you'll find the best for this. Please let us know.

Merry Christmas to everyone!
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Old Dec 25, 2003, 12:01 PM   #15
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I think I have my answer. I used a friends Olympus C4000z yesterday. It is dramatically better than the A80 in red eye performance. It is a little bit of a larger camera, but not too big for my use. I only previewed the images on the LCD, but they looked good. I've seen other pics he has taken and he has no red eye issues. I will get a copy of the shots I took on Sunday to look at more closely. There are few things I dont like about it compared to the A80. It's a little bigger, doesn't have a built in lens cover, doesn't have as many settings on the thumbwheel. You have to use the LCD menu a lot more. The LCD is bigger (1.8 ) which is a plus. It uses SM rather than CF which is a shame. It is a trade off I am willing to make since I do a fair amount of indoor flash photos with only available lighting.

The reviews I've seen of it are very good. User reviews are also very positive,
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Old Dec 30, 2003, 1:59 AM   #16
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One solution is to use a photoediting program like photoshop to take the red eye out. Heck, if you were careful, I bet you could use mspaint to take red eye out. if you have a point and shoot red eye is going to crop up...some cameras more than others. I use photoshop and can easily remove red eye.
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 12:40 PM   #17
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I have an A-80 and the occurance of red-eye is MUCH, MUCH less than with my Nikon CoolPix 950. Compared with most recent compact digital cameras, I think the A-80 is better than most when it comes to red-eye.
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Old Jan 20, 2004, 8:04 AM   #18
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This review of the A80 shows almost no red-eye:

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/ca...ew/index.shtml
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Old Jan 21, 2004, 12:34 AM   #19
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I like that site, but the red eye test is pretty worthless IMHO. The A80 or A70 will always have a red eye problem. The Oly C4000, Sony P10, and the S400 I now have (and really like) all have the problem as well. Every compact camera with the flash close to the lens has it. All of them. Its a fact.

The only way I found to get shots without red eye is to get close to the subject and not use any zoom. This would cause an uneven flash, with the subject overexposed and the background underexposed. To get an even exposure, you need to back up and use the zoom to dispurse the flash. This causes the red eye to be much worse. For group shots, getting in close is not possible anyway.

I'll be getting another camera to use for indoor flash photos that will have a hot shoe for a dedicated external flash that I can bounce.
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Old Jan 21, 2004, 4:20 AM   #20
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Sjm is right - in group photos, when everyone is looking different directions, the red eye issue is unavoidable. I was happy with my A70 regarding red eyes until I tried group shots in low light conditions.
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