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Old Nov 26, 2010, 12:08 PM   #1
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Default Some Canon SX-130 shots

Hi,

Figured I might as well post some shots.

From what I can tell flickr down sizes the photos so there is some loss of quality even at their highest resolution. (is there a site where I can upload full size for free?)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Descriptions are with the pictures.
If anyone wants more details, I can provide ISO settings, etc....

For a P&S I am quite happy with the image quality - taking these shots (in difficult lighting or on rapidly moving subjects) push my limits as a totally casual amateur photographer but I think all and all they are pretty decent shots. All shots are taken as-is (minus the loss of quality from the flickr site).


Thanks,
Juggernaut

Last edited by Juggernaut; Nov 26, 2010 at 12:26 PM.
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Old Nov 26, 2010, 3:51 PM   #2
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They look good but the highlights are getting a little blown (over exposed),
I believe, like the white on his belly for example... Even though, you can at
least get them slightly better with just a touch of PP...


Hope you don't mind but I just did a quick and dirty on this one with FastStone...


Contrast +10
Brightness -20
Saturation +10
I left sharpness alone


Juggernaut_ORG



Juggernaut_FastStone


With something like Photoshop, and taking more time, you could probably do
even better...


Nice series though... Keep at it and you'll get that camera dialed in nicely...

Last edited by Wizzard0003; Nov 26, 2010 at 3:57 PM.
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Old Nov 26, 2010, 8:05 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizzard0003 View Post
They look good but the highlights are getting a little blown (over exposed),
I believe, like the white on his belly for example... Even though, you can at
least get them slightly better with just a touch of PP...


Hope you don't mind but I just did a quick and dirty on this one with FastStone...


Contrast +10
Brightness -20
Saturation +10
I left sharpness alone


With something like Photoshop, and taking more time, you could probably do
even better...


Nice series though... Keep at it and you'll get that camera dialed in nicely...
Nice!

Looks much better.

What is PP?

To date, I have never tried to edit any of my pictures...but you have inspired me to try to learn (when I get the time some day ).

I believe the ISO was 80 so that might explain why the original is a little too bright.
I just learned how to adjust the exposure - learned that when taking the moon shot...

And I like how you have removed the haziness....figured it was the window plus an overcast day causing that.

Great job!
Thanks!
Juggernaut
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Old Nov 26, 2010, 9:48 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juggernaut View Post
Nice!

Looks much better.

What is PP?

To date, I have never tried to edit any of my pictures...but you have inspired me to try to learn (when I get the time some day ).

I believe the ISO was 80 so that might explain why the original is a little too bright.
I just learned how to adjust the exposure - learned that when taking the moon shot...

And I like how you have removed the haziness....figured it was the window plus an overcast day causing that.

Great job!
Thanks!
Juggernaut
I think PP is Post Production.
Great pix btw.
Photoshop is a very great tool for editing still pictures. With all the Photoshop tutorials out there, it can take your already great pictures to another level!
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Old Nov 27, 2010, 9:29 AM   #5
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Photoshop will set you back about $600, so a better alternative for a beginner at post processing (PP) would be Photoshop Elements (PE). I was able to find a good deal on PE version 8 last year for $60. You can get the latest version 9 on Amazon for around $65 right now. Edit: it looks like you also get a mail in rebate of $20, so net cost will be $45. Good deal!

Dennis

Last edited by denncald; Nov 27, 2010 at 9:31 AM.
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Old Nov 27, 2010, 10:34 AM   #6
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That's a pretty good deal, Dennis...

In the meantime, Juggernaut, you can download FastStone for free just to start
to get a handle on post processing...

FastStone Image Viewer 4.2
http://www.faststone.org/

Most times I only use Contrast, Brightness and Saturation with occasionally a touch
of sharpness... Download it and try it with the images you posted... You can use the
settings I posted as a rough guide to give you a feel for PP'ing...

Be sure though that you ALWAYS PP with copies of the original images so if you make
a mistake you've always got the original safe to make a copy and try again...

Hope that helps...

EDIT:
Speaking of exposure, here's something that you may find helpful that will give you
a better idea on what exposure is all about...

Perfect Exposure
(Watch all 7 parts)
http://vimeo.com/6571932

This is a very good series and, though 7 parts, it's not too long...

Last edited by Wizzard0003; Nov 27, 2010 at 11:36 AM.
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 5:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wizzard0003 View Post
That's a pretty good deal, Dennis...

In the meantime, Juggernaut, you can download FastStone for free just to start
to get a handle on post processing...

FastStone Image Viewer 4.2
http://www.faststone.org/

Most times I only use Contrast, Brightness and Saturation with occasionally a touch
of sharpness... Download it and try it with the images you posted... You can use the
settings I posted as a rough guide to give you a feel for PP'ing...

Be sure though that you ALWAYS PP with copies of the original images so if you make
a mistake you've always got the original safe to make a copy and try again...

Hope that helps...

EDIT:
Speaking of exposure, here's something that you may find helpful that will give you
a better idea on what exposure is all about...

Perfect Exposure
(Watch all 7 parts)
http://vimeo.com/6571932

This is a very good series and, though 7 parts, it's not too long...
Hi.

Thanks for the link.
Learned alot - stuff I didn't know I didn't know

BUT it is not too clear to me as to what I am supposed to do with the information - he does not come out and say it in layman's terms.

He says to put my meter on the middle tones and "put" my settings to level 5 exposure. But what does that mean and how do I do that?
Does it mean that I change my aperature and shutter speed until the metering on the middle tone is in the middle (level 5), and then I take the shot at that level even if it does not look right on the screen I am looking at? Am I thinking about it correctly?

So like in the squirrel shot, I should have metered & found I was somewhere in the high 6's & then I should have adjusted my shutter speed or aperature to bring it down to the 5 range?
Am I making sense?

Thanks!
Juggernaut
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Old Dec 3, 2010, 2:10 AM   #8
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I just bought this camera for my son for Christmas. I think he will be pleased with it if the results are like your shots. Looking at the original squirrel in Flikr and comparing it to the effort of wizzard I dont see any improvement on the highlights but he has created a loss in the shadows. In Photoshop I first used Auto Contrast then applied Shadow/Highlights. This gave more detail in the shadow area and also in the white area. Most of the belly white is not so much blown out as its just so white. No color at all in the fur.
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Old Dec 3, 2010, 2:45 AM   #9
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You're absolutely right, Bynx, but FastStone doesn't have the power of Photoshop... I don't
have Photoshop and neither does Juggernaut but this gave him an example of how to at least
get rid of the "Haze" in the image from being over exposed and make it a bit more pleasing
with a free program he can use right now... Photoshop is unarguably a better program...
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Old Dec 3, 2010, 3:32 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juggernaut View Post
Hi.

Thanks for the link.
Learned alot - stuff I didn't know I didn't know

BUT it is not too clear to me as to what I am supposed to do with the information - he does not come out and say it in layman's terms.

He says to put my meter on the middle tones and "put" my settings to level 5 exposure. But what does that mean and how do I do that?
Does it mean that I change my aperature and shutter speed until the metering on the middle tone is in the middle (level 5), and then I take the shot at that level even if it does not look right on the screen I am looking at? Am I thinking about it correctly?

So like in the squirrel shot, I should have metered & found I was somewhere in the high 6's & then I should have adjusted my shutter speed or aperature to bring it down to the 5 range?
Am I making sense?

Thanks!
Juggernaut
He explains that early on when talking about how different shutter speed and f-stop combinations
will relate to the same exposure, for example: 1/500 sec @ f5.6 will give the same exposure as
1/250 sec @ f4.0 or 1/1000 sec @ f8.0... He also explains how changing one or the other alone
will move exposure brighter (towards over exposure) or darker (towards under exposure)...

Examples:

If you slow the shutter down (open for a longer time) but leave the f-stop the same it will move
exposure towards the positive (brighter)... If you speed the shutter up (open for a shorter time)
but leave the f-stop the same it will move exposure towards the negative (darker)...

In the same manner, if you open the aperture (smaller f number) but leave the shutter the same it
will move exposure towards the positive (brighter)... If you close the aperture down (larger f number)
but leave the shutter the same it will move exposure towards the negative (darker)...

Which you choose (shutter or aperture) to move exposure towards the positive or negative is a
decision that the photographer must make themselves depending on conditions and what he/she
want to achive... Watch that tutorial over and over while you learn to use your camera and things
will start to fall into place over time...

Here's a nice little camera simulator that will help you see and understand what aperture, shutter
and ISO do..

http://www.kamerasimulator.se/eng/?page_id=2

If you click the box that says, "link aperture/shutter" and then move the aperture (or shutter) slider
you can watch how the Depth of Field (DOF) changes in the picture but exposure doesn't... If you
unclick the box you will see how exposure changes if you move one or the other... You will also notice
an "Exposure Meter" at the bottom of the image so you can see how that changes as you play with
different exposure combinations of aperture and shutter...

Hope that helps...
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