Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Canon

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 25, 2010, 5:19 PM   #1
Member
 
KarenWHowell76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AL
Posts: 33
Default Camera Dropped

My camera was dropped (off of end table today.) It's a Canon Xsi. It's 1 year old. It's flash lights up like it's going to take a picture, but then it won't take a picture. Any idea what could be wrong or what do I do??? Are there people out there to work on cameras like these? I'm just SICK over this! Any help is GREATLY appreciated.
KarenWHowell76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 25, 2010, 5:41 PM   #2
Member
 
KarenWHowell76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AL
Posts: 33
Default

Husband has looked at it and thinks it's in the lens. You can "hear" it trying to "move" but it can't get it together to take the pic. Suggestions!?!?!?
KarenWHowell76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 25, 2010, 7:52 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Belize & UK
Posts: 463
Default

Firstly try it with another lens to see whether it's the lens, the body, or both. Then get whatever turns out to be broken off to Canon for a quote. I'd be very wary of third-party repairers.

If it's the lens then be prepared to buy another. If it was the kit lens a new one shouldn't be too expensive.
peterbj7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2010, 4:08 PM   #4
Member
 
KarenWHowell76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AL
Posts: 33
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterbj7 View Post
Firstly try it with another lens to see whether it's the lens, the body, or both. Then get whatever turns out to be broken off to Canon for a quote. I'd be very wary of third-party repairers.

If it's the lens then be prepared to buy another. If it was the kit lens a new one shouldn't be too expensive.

It's the lens. My larger lens works fine! He got it to work, but it's hit or miss. It will take a few then it will start "clicking" again!

It was the kit lens that came w/the camera. Should I buy the same thing or is there something a lil' different and better I should get since I'm going to have to replace it?!?!?!
KarenWHowell76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2010, 5:30 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Belize & UK
Posts: 463
Default

That lens is the EF-S 18-55 IS and is a perfectly respectable low-end lens. I would still get it to Canon to see if repairing it is economic. Remember that Canon's list price is $200, and you could probably find it for less. I see $174 at Amazon for a Canon-warrantied one, but just $145 for the same lens without Canon's warranty, though the shop you get it from may well give their own limited warranty. That's quite tempting, as it's so cheap for a new lens.

Anything much better is going to cost a lot more money. The best EF-S lens for that range by far is the 17-55 f2.8 IS, vastly better for indoor use, but Canon's price is $1179. Again, you could probably find it for less. That is the one I'd buy.

But perhaps a faster lens isn't what you need, but more zoom range? Canon's EF-S 18-135 IS would give you far more reach while still going as wide, and that is more affordable at $500 (again, Canon's list price). Assuming you won't be going to a full frame camera any time soon, you might as well stick with EF-S lenses and not get the bigger and heavier (and more expensive) EF lenses.

There is another which covers the same range but goes both wider and longer, and that's the EF-S 15-85 IS. At $800.

There are also lenses from third party manufacturers, and I'm thinking primarily of Tamron and Sigma. Tamron especially tend to give more "bang for the buck", though the quality may not be as good as the Canon. I'm no expert on those options. They do an f2.8 constant aperture lens, rather like the Canon that would be first on my list, in two versions - non-stabilised for around $460 and stabilised for about $200 more. For this focal length range I'd be quite happy to go for the non-stabilised version, though I don't know if there are other image quality differences.

Tamron also make "super-zooms" which cover your focal length range but go a lot beyond making them very useful as "one stop" lenses. These are all variable aperture. Their 18-200 which is not stabilised (quite a disadvantage at 200mm) can be had for only $285 at Amazon. Their 18-270 (a massive range) can be had as either non-stabilised or stabilised - I would only get the stabilised version, which costs $630 at Amazon. The non stabilised version is much cheaper at $280 but I think you'd regret it.

Sigma make several lenses covering this range. Their 18-50 variable-aperture stabilised lens costs $420, their 17-50 f2.8 stabilised one is $980, and in between there's the 18-50 f2.8 non-stabilised one at $660.

Both Sigma and Tamron lenses can be quite variable in quality, both of design and manufacture. But they can represent very good value. At POTN (google it) you can find threads ordered by lens that people have posted their pictures and comments to. That may help you decide.

My choice - definitely the Canon 17-55 f2.8, even at $1180. It's the one lens in all those I've mentioned that would never be superseded by another, unless that is you decide to move to full frame. My second and third choices would be the f2.8 Sigma & Tamron lenses with this zoom range. There's no substitute for having a constant f2.8 lens.

You don't say what your larger lens is. Would there be scope for replacing both lenses with one of the super-zooms?

Another option might be to send the lens for repair, and buy another lens that can partner it when you get it back. This lens and probably your longer one won't be very good indoors and in poor light, so you could get a fast prime (fixed focal length) that would be useful to you afterwards. The ones I have in mind are the EF 50mm f1.8, which is a real bargain at under $100 and would give you good low-light capability. If you found that focal length a bit long for your cropped-sensor camera, I'd suggest the EF 35mm f2.0 at $320 or the EF 28mm f2.8 (a bit slower) at $270. There is also the EF 28mm f1.8, but that's $490.

I daresay I've utterly confused you!

Last edited by peterbj7; Dec 26, 2010 at 5:36 PM.
peterbj7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2010, 8:47 PM   #6
Member
 
KarenWHowell76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: AL
Posts: 33
Default

Peter, this is the other lens I have. I bought it almost a year ago..I believe there was some type of promotion for buying the Xsi and this lens.

Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4.0-5.6 IS Telephoto Zoom Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras Sold by: Amazon.com, LLC

I've heard about the 50mm f1.8, but wasn't sure what it would be used for. I'm just a mom that uses it for taking pics of my kids! So yes, I'm utterly confused!!!

When googling...looking for the EF-S 18-55 IS.....a Sigma came up on Amazon with decent reviews. http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-18-50mm-...417885&sr=1-20 It also is about 1/2 the cost of the Canon....but b/c I don't know/understand all the lingo I'm not sure if I'm comparing the same thing or if their might be something different being the reason other than name for the Sigma being so much cheaper!
KarenWHowell76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2010, 10:42 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Belize & UK
Posts: 463
Default

That Sigma is extraordinarily cheap. At $90 it's cheaper than the cheapest lens Canon make. I haven't read the reviews, but if they sound OK then try it. You won't have lost a lot if it isn't up to much. Just beware that Sigma don't have the best reputation for manufacturing consistency.

If you get that lens and the Canon is repaired, you'll have two lenses covering the same range. If you were to get one of the primes I mentioned, such as the 50mm f1.8, you'd have a lens that worked well in much lower light than your (repaired) Canon zoom or this Sigma. Ultimately it depends on what you want to do with it. If you only ever use flash indoors it won't give much added value, but it would if you'd like to use available light.

The long lens you have is a solid lens, one that gives good results. No need to change that, or to duplicate any significant part of its range.
peterbj7 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:34 PM.