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Old Oct 6, 2004, 10:38 PM   #1
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I finally bought 410 aftert doing months of research on Canon and Sony W1. I really liked the picture quality of the Canon. I have few questions about it:-

a)Whats the best way to take good pics with this camera in auto mode, manual mode.

b)I want to start palying around with the manual mode of the camera, any sugestions what should I change first iso settings . Isn't it better to take the pic at the higest resolution to get sharp quality pics.



Thanks
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 12:42 AM   #2
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willbemcse wrote:
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I finally bought 410 aftert doing months of research on Canon and Sony W1. I really liked the picture quality of the Canon. I have few questions about it:-

a)Whats the best way to take good pics with this camera in auto mode, manual mode.
Your model does not give you full control over aperture and shutter speed (except for long exposure purposes). So, it is not considered to have "manual exposure". Although, it does give you control over things like ISO speed and exposure compensation.

In full auto, the camera will try to meter the scene and set the correct aperture andshutter speed for proper exposure. In some conditions, it can be useful to modify your camera's behavior. This is where Exposure Compensation comes in.

For example, if you had a subject that was backlit (sun or bright light behind them so that they were in shadows and darker than the rest of the image), you may want to use Exposure Compensation, set to a +EV value. This tells the camera to brighten the image more than it normally would.Chances are, in most conditions, it will simply use a slower shutter speed than normal for the lighting (although it could also use a larger aperture). The downside of this technique is that the rest of the image can be overexposed some. But, if the subject in shadows is more important, then you'd be able to control the exposure to your liking.

In other cases, your subject may be brighter than the rest of the scene. So, in order for it not to be too bright (since the camera will try to insure more of the scene is exposed better), then you may want to set Exposure Compensation to a -EV value (telling the camera not to expose the image as bright as it normally would). In most conditions, it would simply use a faster shutter speed than it normally would for the lighting (although it could also use a smaller aperture).

ISO speed is another setting that can be useful at times. In low light, the camera will automatically increase it to allow faster shutter speeds. Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast in lower light. However, this increases noise levels (similar to film grain). So, if you would rather have slower shutter speeds, then you can set ISO speed yourself. Of course, you would need to make sure you are using a tripod to prevent motion blur from camera shake if the shutter speeds are too slow.

Another example is if you want faster shutter speeds than the camera would normally use. Then, you could deliberately increase ISO speed (at the expense of higher noise). Sometimes more noise is better than motion blur.

Forum MemberMikefellh posted a link to this site in another post a while back. I skimmed it's contents, and it looks like it may have some useful information that may help you understand what the settings do:

http://209.196.177.41

Quote:
b)I want to start palying around with the manual mode of the camera, any sugestions what should I change first iso settings .
If you are going to experiment, make sure to do it when the photos are not important. This is a good way to learn the impact that different settings will have.

Quote:
Isn't it better to take the pic at the higest resolution to get sharp quality pics.
The resolution needed depends on the print sizes you'll use. But, I always take my photos at the highest resolution my camera supports. You never know when you may want to crop a photo, or have one that you'll want to print at a larger size.


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Old Oct 7, 2004, 7:34 PM   #3
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I took some of the pics ad posted them here

http://groups.msn.com/CanonTest/shoebox.msnw. Is there a way to turn the flash off while taking pics. As some the pics are pretty bright , they dont look natural ??



Also some of the pics are wavy because of camera shake . I wanted a good point and shoot camera with little bit of manual.

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Old Oct 7, 2004, 9:41 PM   #4
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willbemcse wrote:
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I took some of the pics ad posted them here

http://groups.msn.com/CanonTest/shoebox.msnw. Is there a way to turn the flash off while taking pics. As some the pics are pretty bright , they dont look natural ??
If you read your manual, you'll see how to do this. The review of your model here also explains it. The Right Controller Key controls the flash modes:

"The 4-way controller lets you navigate menus and select images during playback. In record mode you press "Up" to change metering mode, press "Right" to change flash modes, press "Down" to change the drive mode and press "Left" to change the focus mode."

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_.../s410_pg2.html

However, indoors without a flash, you'll need to use a tripod. Otherwise, you'll get motion blur from camera shake because the shutter speeds will be too slow.

You could try setting ISO speeds to a higher value. But, this will increase noise levels. You're probably better off either using a tripod or the flash indoors (what is bright to the human eye is not to the camera's lens.

Quote:
Also some of the pics are wavy because of camera shake . I wanted a good point and shoot camera with little bit of manual.
The Canon S410 is a very good point and shoot (especially considering it's small size). It will have some limitations (as all cameras do). You'll need to learn a bit more about it's behavior for best results. This will take practice.

You were very close to subject in the one photo I looked at that was blurry. Were you in Macro Focus Mode? If you get closer than 1.5 feet (46cm) you must use the Macro Focus mode. As far as blur from camera shake, I can't tell what your settings were by the photos in your album. The camera should increase shutter speeds if light is too low in Auto Mode (or use the flash).

If you want to look at the camera settings used, you can tell what they were with many image editors. A good free one is Irfanview (downloadable from http://www.irfanview.com ). Make sure to download the free plugins, too. To see the settings used for an image, select Image, Information, EXIF.

You can then copy them from the clipboard and paste them in a post (along with the link to the problem image). Then, users will be able to offer suggestions.

Quote:
I wanted a good point and shoot camera with little bit of manual.
The Canon S410 is a very good little camera. No camera is going to take perfect photos in all conditions. You'll need to learn to take advantage of it's strengths, and work around it's limitations. I'd start with trying to get an understanding of what the different controls and modes are for.
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