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Old Jan 7, 2005, 3:52 AM   #11
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I just checked my new g6 ... it really does have manual focus as well. But I guess I really prefer SLR-lens-type manual focus.
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 1:57 PM   #12
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well I agree a focus ring is way better, but one thing plain old manual focus is good for is when you decide you want to use conversion lenses. The Lumix Fz3 does not have manual focus and that is one reason I did not buy it that over the S1.

Also, having manual focus allows me to set the hyperfocul distance on the S1 and then save it as a profile to the custom "C" setting on the dial. I can then recall this profile in low light situations and know thatI will have focus so long as I'm 4-5 feet back from the first subject. results have been very good.


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Old Jan 7, 2005, 4:14 PM   #13
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lenscaplarry wrote:
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Also, having manual focus allows me to set the hyperfocul distance on the S1 and then save it as a profile to the custom "C" setting on the dial. I can then recall this profile in low light situations and know that I will have focus so long as I'm 4-5 feet back from the first subject. results have been very good.
can you go into a bit more detail about how you do this? I'm very interested in focus in low light conditions.

TIA!
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 5:53 PM   #14
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sure!

1) turn the dial to the "C" position

2) Turn the IS on, you definetly want it in your profile.

3)press and hold down the manual focus botton on side of lens.

4) using the direction pad while holding down the manual focus button, set the focus to 10ft or 3.1 meters . now let go of the MF button. (this particular setting is for 5ft to infinity)

for example:You can also pick 7.5 feet and get everything from 3.5 feet to 40.6ft

5) Remember its low light, so you need higher ISO. Press "FUNC"button and select ISO. Now set the ISO between 100-400 .

The higher you go the more noise appears in the pic, but you'll get a faster shutter and you can always removemost of thenoise later in post. Again, this depends on how dark it is, so play around and find what ISO is acceptable for you.

6)now select menu and scroll down to "C" save settings. Press set select OK and its now saved.

7) turn the camera off, walk over to the dark area, stand 5ft back and press the shutter half way to evaluate exposure and then fully down to take the pic.

8) review pic on cam

9)review pic on computer

10)log on to the forum and let me know how it turned out.
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 10:26 PM   #15
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lenscaplarry wrote:
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sure!

10) log on to the forum and let me know how it turned out.
woa -- i must say, I'm quite impressed with the results. Thank you! I set it ISO 100 and it went to 1s/f2.8 although I'd prob like to get longer shutter speeds. That's not possible though, is it?

Now, what sort of post processing do you do to remove noise? I've photoshop CS, if that helps...
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Old Jan 8, 2005, 12:14 AM   #16
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1S, Now thats low light! try 400 ISO

The higher the ISO speed, the higher the shutter speed that can be used.

Try the free Noise Ninjaplug in for photoshop.


http://www.picturecode.com/nn_beta.htm

just extract it to the photoshop plugins folder, then open up photoshop

and select /filters/ [then] /picturecode/ [and]/noiseninja.../

if you do a search online, you can find others aswell.


also, here is a handy hyperfocal distance calculator. You can actually look up most cameras models.

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

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Old Jan 8, 2005, 8:58 PM   #17
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well, if I can make the camera steady enough, then what's the point of jacking up ISO? I can place it on a hard surface, following the tips you gave me for focus and it comes out fine with ISO50, 4s shutter speed. Why would I bother with noise post processing?
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Old Jan 8, 2005, 9:28 PM   #18
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well with a 4sec shutter (shutter open for 4sec) any movement in your subjects would result in blur.If all your doing is taking static shots,Then I agree there is no need. However, try some shots of moving objects and 4 sec is just way to long for the shutter to be open.

For instance, Party type situations where your subjects are people, would benefit from faster shutter speed, thus the need for higher ISO and post processing. Thats one instance where you could bennefit from a faster shutter. But, there are many more.


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