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Old Jan 3, 2005, 7:09 PM   #1
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Hi

I recently bought a Canon G6, mostly because of all thepositive reviews i read about it.

what I need in a camera is the ability to use it as a point & shoot (For exampleat parties, and when Iwant toget a quick shotof something exiting).

But I also would like to able to experiment with -and learnthe manual settings when I have the time. I admit that i´m somewhat a beginner in the world of photography, but I want to learn......but at my own pace.

So...maybe it´s just me (it probably is), butwhen I set the camera to auto, which I do when i´m at a party, the pictures I get are just awful.Some are blurry, some are toodark and the rest are too bright ( only about 10 % are ok ).

Am I really forced to learn everything about shutterspeads, apeture, whitebalance, exposureetc, before I can take a decent picture with this camera???

Iknew when I bought it,thatit´s more than just an ordinary P&S camera. But i don´t want to have to spend 5 minutes every time getting allthose settings right before i take a picture.

If any of you own a G6 and have experience using it as a P&S, and still get good pictures using "quick" settings in various conditions. Then pleeease let me in on your secrets (which setting for which conditions). BecauseI must admit that i´m starting to regretbuying it.

I know that i´m just complaining and complaining......i´m sorry, it´s just very frustrating for me. What I had hoped to be a positive experience,seems to have turned into a nightmare.

Thanks for putting up with me

Peter
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Old Jan 4, 2005, 9:02 AM   #2
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At a party..if you set the camera to AUTO, you must first point the camera at your subject. Then hold the camera really steady, and press the shutter button HALF-WAY in (not all the way down). The camera then does a couple of things like finds a solution for what exposure to set, and what the focus should be...and the camera will lock these settings. Then...with the camera still held really steady and still pointed at the subject, you can then press the shutter button all the way in until it doesn't go in anymore. That's when the camera takes the picture.

If you do experimentation with the manual mode M, you will have to read up some things on the net about aperture setting and shutter speed. The combination of these two things determines whether your picture will be bright enough, sharp, or blurry, etc.

I have a g6 and I reckon that the manual is passable, but can be vague and not so complete in some areas. If I was writing the manual, I'd just have a section for beginners that just advises them on the useage of the AUTO setting. Point...hold real steady...press shutter button halfway in...check for warning/blinking lights on the camera...press the shutter button all the way in.
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Old Jan 4, 2005, 9:12 AM   #3
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Hi Peter:

Your experience is not that unusual for someonewho isn'tfamiliar with a new camera.

The auto mode is the simplest "point and shoot" mode on this camera and it will try to give you usable pictures. But if you're at a party, the lighting might be too dim for handheld shots and you'll get blur from camera movement. Also the flash is at the top right hand cormer of the camera, (looking from the front) and it doesn't pop up so it's quite easy to get a finger in front of it and block the flash on some pictures.

The auto mode should work fine outside. I suggest you start using the program mode "P" as well. It's almost the same as auto, but gives you the option of changing some of the settings that are locked down in auto mode. You can explore the other modes as you have time.

To get the most from this camerai, you should the basics of shutter speed and aperture. The top information panel on the camera will give you the main settings it's using for the pictures. If your shutter speed is slower than 1/30 sec at wideangle, or 1/200 sec at telephoto, you will get blur from camera shake.

Just start slow, and don't get too upset if some of your pictures don't look good at first, they'll get better as you become more familiar with the camera.

regards....Santos
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Old Jan 4, 2005, 9:25 AM   #4
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Thanks for your input.

The reason I sound so frustrated, is that i´m movin to Vienna for six months. And I really want to come home with some great pictures........My fear is of course that I will be experiencing the same problems downthere.

Since I will be taking pictures in all kinds of conditions. In bars, outside in sunlight and dark, on the ski-slopes etc. I´m worried that I won´t get those quick spontanious pictures, that requires me to be quick on the draw.

Do anyone know of a good site that explaines how to take good pictures in various conditions, without having to be a photo wizzz ???

Peter
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Old Jan 4, 2005, 9:41 AM   #5
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I've been using the G6 both indoors and outdoors with the AUTO setting, and it does just fine in low light because it's got a reasonably powerful flash, and this light that helps the camera focus.

If your camera is getting bad pictures on auto setting, then it's possible that you may have to get it checked, since there's a possibility that there's something wrong with it.

If you shoot at night time, such as buildings far away with lights, you may want to use a tripod to keep the camera steady, and use manual settings. But as mentioned, it's necessary to understanding those settings..so you can check this site, and use google.com to search for other 'basic digital photography' sites...

http://www.photoxels.com/digital-pho...tutorials.html

The G6 is one of the nicest cameras of it's class there is. The auto setting probably works better than a lot of other cameras in their auto setting. So I would kind of guess that if you're getting bad pictures on your AUTO setting for typical indoor shooting conditions, then other cameras are going to give you the same results. Maybe you can upload some not-so-personal photos where you have found the problem, so that we can assess the situation...ie the lighting etc.
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