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Old Jan 19, 2005, 11:58 AM   #1
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ok, how do you use a slow shutter in broad daylight without over exposing the hell out of your pic?? is this possible?? seems to me i have seen pics's especially of waterfalls shot in the day and the water looks all blury but the rocks and everything thats not moving is clear and sharp. i tried it with a fountian and guess what??you couldnt even see the fountian!!! :?

Thanks!

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Old Jan 19, 2005, 2:34 PM   #2
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Check the EXIF info of the pictures you've seen... this should give you a good idea... Also, probably that the waterfalls weren't in BRIGHT light.

Knowing nothing about that, I'd say that u keep the ISO to 50, you set the aperture to f8.... And you choose a shutter which is a few stops slower than what u'd get normally at a wider aperture. Once more, this is my guess since I have never tried that... I am not too experienced either. Mostly I'd just try many settings, god I love digital cameras.
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Old Jan 19, 2005, 2:49 PM   #3
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Yes, slowest ISO you have, high F-stop, and try using a 1, 2 or 3 stop ND(Neutral Density)filter in front of the lens. Should help slow down your shutter :-)
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Old Jan 19, 2005, 5:24 PM   #4
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How much of an ND filter would I need in front of a Canon S1 IS to take a 1/2000" iso50 F/8.0 shot of the sun and have the sun be a dull red or orange, instead of a severely overexposed white blob?
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Old Jan 23, 2005, 1:01 PM   #5
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zacker wrote:
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ok, how do you use a slow shutter in broad daylight without over exposing the heck out of your pic?? is this possible?? seems to me i have seen pics's especially of waterfalls shot in the day and the water looks all blury but the rocks and everything thats not moving is clear and sharp. i tried it with a fountian and guess what??you couldnt even see the fountian!!! :?

Thanks!

-zacker-
good question, eh. I wonder if you could go to M mode, f8, exposure comp way down and see how slow you can take the shutter speed until the pic gets all washed out. Same idea when taking pictures of ppl on a beach with the sun behind them, you know.
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Old Jan 23, 2005, 10:21 PM   #6
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coontie wrote:
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zacker wrote:
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ok, how do you use a slow shutter in broad daylight without over exposing the heck out of your pic?? is this possible?? seems to me i have seen pics's especially of waterfalls shot in the day and the water looks all blury but the rocks and everything thats not moving is clear and sharp. i tried it with a fountian and guess what??you couldnt even see the fountian!!! :?

Thanks!

-zacker-
good question, eh. I wonder if you could go to M mode, f8, exposure comp way down and see how slow you can take the shutter speed until the pic gets all washed out. Same idea when taking pictures of ppl on a beach with the sun behind them, you know.
The picture would start to look washed out even with a one stop overexposure. A much better better method would be to set the camera on aperture priority with the aperture set to F8. With the ISO set to 50, you'd get a shutter speed of 1/200 sec in sunlight and about 1/50 sec on a cloudy-bright day. Not quite slow enough to get that blur you wanted.

Adding an 8X neutral density filter (which produces a 3 stop loss of light) will allow you to use a shutter speed 3 EV slower, giving you 1/25 sec exposure on a sunny day. Adding a polarizing filter on top of the ND filter will give you an additional 2 EV loss of light, or 1/8 sec on a sunny day. That will give you a nice blur on moving water. Use a tripod...

regards.... Santos
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Old Jan 24, 2005, 1:00 AM   #7
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Let's see:

Manual or Semi-Automatic modes required.

#1: Set ISO to the lowest value: 50 or 100

#2: Put the camera in Av mode or Tv mode (don't know what this is? Read the manual or buy a book on photography - really, you'll learn something)

#3: Av: set aperture to smallest (f32)

#4: Tv: set shutter speed to slowest 1/4s or so.

#5: Click the shutter release.

It's that simple. No exposure comp will help. It just messes with the overall exposure. What you need to do is balance the exposure and ensure the slowest shutter speed. If you get white (overexposed), then the aperture couldn't stop down enough to ensure proper exposure. Use a shorter shutter time.

Think of the shutter being the time the valve is open, and the aperture is the size of the hose and you're trying to fill a bucket without over-flowing. A daylight image that meters 125 at f5.6 will expose properly at these other settings:

2000 f1.4
1000 f2
500 f2.8
250 f4
125 f5.6
60 f8
30 f11
15 f16
8 f22

To freeze the water, use the faster shutter speeds (open a shorter time) .

To blur the water, use the slower shutter speeds (open longer).

If you can't get the aperture and shutter speeds needed to get a proper exposure (still too bright and overexposed) then you'll need to get a nuetral density filter. They come in various densities, 1 through many stops.

Cheers!


One other thing Zacker - I think you bough the Pro 1. It's aperture doesn't close down very far - f8 I think. So to get good blurs you'll need a neutral density filter. Also, set the camera ISO to 50,Av mode, stop down as much as possible (until camera blinks a warning). That's the best you can do without a filter. Try a pair of really dark gray sunglasses to get t he idea of what the $20 filter can do much better.


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Old Jan 24, 2005, 7:19 AM   #8
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Hmmmm, Filters huh? Never even thought of that one!

Thanks guys, i guess the next thing to do is go to the local cam shop and try out a few different types, this will also get me off my duff and try out the tele lense... just have to find someone who stocks them locally.

thanks again!

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Old Jan 24, 2005, 1:33 PM   #9
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aren't there filters one can use in photoshop, to achieve the same effect?
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Old Jan 24, 2005, 2:06 PM   #10
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i dont think so... this is something that needs to be done while taking the picture, photo shop would blur the whole pic, not just whats moving... i guess you could cut out the water, blur it and re-paste it in but thats like a half hours worth of work that wouldnt even look right when its done!

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