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Old Jan 21, 2005, 7:13 PM   #1
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My G2 disappeared "into the shop" and I can't get a status from Best Buy on when I'll get it back.I may just give up and get a new one. Just in case, I am looking at the G6 and V3 as potential replacements. I do mostly sport shooting, the kids play all kinds of sports, and some concert type photos that I don't want to use an external flash for. My main problem with the G2 was that the autofocus just would not lock on in many cases. And when it did, the pics were usually blurry.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I was hoping that people with experience with these cameras could offer feedback on how well they might work for this kind of application. If there are others that might be better, please let me know.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Thanks

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Peggy
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 7:07 AM   #2
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pmanza wrote:
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My G2 disappeared "into the shop" and I can't get a status from Best Buy on when I'll get it back.I may just give up and get a new one. Just in case, I am looking at the G6 and V3 as potential replacements. I do mostly sport shooting, the kids play all kinds of sports, and some concert type photos that I don't want to use an external flash for. My main problem with the G2 was that the autofocus just would not lock on in many cases. And when it did, the pics were usually blurry.

I was hoping that people with experience with these cameras could offer feedback on how well they might work for this kind of application. If there are others that might be better, please let me know.
Peggy, chances are your photos that were blurry, even with Autofocus locked was due to shutter speeds that were too slow for the lighting conditions (you're probably seeing motion blur from camera shake/subject movement).

Indoor lighting is very dim, and the camera must keep the shutter speed open long enough for proper exposure.The G series Canon models are about the best non-DSLR models for this purpose (indoor photos without a flash). This is because the lens on them is twice as bright as most, allowing shutter speeds twice as fast for any given lighting condition and ISO speed. Most lenses have a largest available aperture off/2.8. The lens on your G2 starts out at f/2.0. Aperture is a ratio between the focal length of the lens and the diameter of the aperture iris, and f/2.0 is twice as bright as f/2.8 (the largest aperture on a model like the V3 you're looking at).

Although the newer models will likely focus a little faster, my guess is that your problem is more likely to be shutter speeds in lighting like your indoor concert photos.

For this type of lighting, you'll need to increase your ISO speed (each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast). But, this will add noise (similar to film grain) to an image.

Staying at your wide angle lens setting will also help (less light reaches the sensor through the lens when using zoom on most models, and motion blur from camera shake is also magnfiied when using zoom, requiring faster shutter speeds as more zoom is used).

To do significantly better indoors without a flash, you'll need to go with a DSLR model. But, you'll also need a bright lens (larger available apertures, represented by smaller f/stop numbers) to go with one.

DSLR models will also focus faster, and are easier to use manual focus with, compared to a non-DSLR model.

Of course, this would be a larger, heavier and more expensive solution.

If you can get close enough to the stage, you may be able to get by with something like a 50mm f/1.8 lens on a DSLR model. On a camera like the Digital Rebel, this lens would have a 35mm equivalent focal length of 80mm (you have to multiply the actual focal length of a lens by 1.6x on this model. The Digital Rebel is missing some of the more advanced settings you get on a camera like the EOS-20D, but it is a relatively inexpensive DSLR, and would allow you to shoot at higher ISO speeds compared to the non-DSLR cameras like your G2.






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Old Jan 24, 2005, 11:28 AM   #3
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Jim C. Thanks for your reply. It looks like I will have to keep my G2 as Best Buy has managed to "find" my camera (they sent it to the wrong repair facility) and claim it is being fixed asap. I am going to play with aperture priority mode when I get it back to see if I can improve indoor pix. Also plan on getting an external flash so that might help too.

Peggy
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Old Jan 24, 2005, 1:31 PM   #4
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pmanza wrote:
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It looks like I will have to keep my G2 as Best Buy has managed to "find" my camera (they sent it to the wrong repair facility) and claim it is being fixed asap.
Great.

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I am going to play with aperture priority mode when I get it back to see if I can improve indoor pix.
Well, in low light, your G2's Autoexposure is going to select the largest avalable aperture anyway (f/2.0 at full wide angle, stopping down to f/2.5 at full zoom). So, I'm not sure if using Aperture Priority and setting the aperture is going to help anything.

So, to get shutter speeds up without a flash, you'll need toincrease ISO speeds for non-stationary subjects. This will increase noise, so you'll need to clean it up later with a tool like Neat Image or Noiseware.

For stationary subjects, you could use a tripod and keep ISO speeds set low.

Or, simply use the flash. ;-)

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Also plan on getting an external flash so that might help too.
That's probably your best bet for mostindoor photos.
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 1:04 AM   #5
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[align=left]Peggy, I might recommend you play with shutter priority indoors, too. Av doesn't control camera shake well enough. If you have a tripod, Av works well. But for hand holding, use Tv and test how slow you can go. Results vary by person and technique. [/align]
[align=left]I used to be able to hold a 1/15 exposure with anormal lens. Today I'm so shaky I must keep it at 1/60 or faster.:sad:
[/align]
[align=center][/align]



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Old Jan 25, 2005, 8:08 AM   #6
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TDM_Canon_User wrote:
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Peggy, I might recommend you play with shutter priority indoors, too. Av doesn't control camera shake well enough. If you have a tripod, Av works well. But for hand holding, use Tv and test how slow you can go. Results vary by person and technique.
If you use Aperture Priority Mode, with the camera set to it's largest available aperture (represented by a smaller f/stop number), it will use the fastest possible shutter speeds for the lighting conditions and ISO speed set, while insuring proper exposure.

So, if you try to use Shutter Priority, and set the Shutter Speed faster than Av Mode would have used, your photos will be underexposed (because a larger aperture than Av Mode was using is not available, so the shutter speeds will be too fast for the conditions).

Again, your camera's autoexposure is going to use the largest available aperture anyway in low light. So, the best way to increase shutter speeds (while still maintaining proper exposure) is to increase ISO speed (which will increase noise levels).

Now, you can use a faster shutter speed than the camera would select, underexposing your photos (using shutter priority with the shutter speed set faster than the camera's autoexposurewould have used for the conditions). But, this will require Post Processing to brighten them up again (and only to a point, if you want to maintain good detail). Also, underexposing a photo and brightening it up later will result in increased noise -- just as if you used a higher ISO speed to begin with.

You can do this with Autoexposure, too. Simply use Exposure Compensation, setting it to a -EV value. In low light, where the camera is already using it's largest available aperture, it will use a faster shutter speed with a -EV value set (underexposing the photo by the amount set). I have seen some users try this technique to get faster shutter speeds, when they were already at their models' highest ISO speed. But, I don't recommend it unless necessary.

Your best bet is to use a flash indoors if your subjects are not stationary -- eliminating the above problems.
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 11:08 AM   #7
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Thanks for all the wonderful advice. If and when I get my camera back I will try all the mentioned techniques and see what works best for me. That is assuming I can get the dangcamera to focus lock so I can take the picture to begin with!

Peggy
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 9:13 AM   #8
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Peggy, there is another solution to your camera motion problem. Many manufactures now make cameras which which have Anti-Shake system that reduce the effects of camera movement and allow using slower shutter speeds with blurring.

Canon has been slow in using the systembut has one camera that uses it, the S1. Other makers such as Minolta and Panasonic have many models available.

I think it's only a matter of time before Canon introduces the system in other cameras.

GlennD






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