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Old Nov 22, 2002, 11:38 PM   #1
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Default How do you take a picture of the moon?

Tried it tonight with my A40. All I get is a round glowing white ball, kind of looks like the sun. No matter where I set the shutter speed or zoom, it looks the same. The moon tonight is full, and bright white. I can make out details with my eyes, but the camera can't see it. Maybe it just can't focus on it unless it is bigger or less bright. I am completely new at this, so any suggestions are welcome.
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Old Nov 23, 2002, 12:14 AM   #2
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Well, I found out one thing I was doing wrong. I was setting the shutter to remain open to long. I finally tried 1/600 and was amazed at the picture. I could actually make out details of the moon's surface. Seems the moon reflects a lot of light, and slow shutter speeds just give you a glowing ball. I only have a x3 zoom on this canon A40, but still it was a respectable shot. Boy, sooooo much to learn.
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Old Nov 23, 2002, 9:28 AM   #3
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I'll have to try that with my Olympus. I've been experimenting with night time shots and haven't had much luck. (I'll read up on it as a last resort...) Last week I was in Milwaukee taking shots of the lighted buildings at night. I used a lamp post in most of them to steady my camera and a few turned out, but most were blurry.

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Old Nov 23, 2002, 3:34 PM   #4
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Pictures of an unobscured moon follow the " sunny 16" rule or what ever the digital equivalent would be on your digicam,since the moon is an object in full sunlight.Therefore ,you dont need a long exposure.

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Old Nov 24, 2002, 11:35 PM   #5
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Let the Camera's built-in meter decide the Exposure, i.e. shoot on the auto mode, or if shooting manually then take a spot reading from the moon surface and manually feed in the settings
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Old Nov 25, 2002, 2:38 AM   #6
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Choose spotmetering or if your in need of that centerweight! Get a zoomlens and shoot! Spot metering is important as it will speed up you shutter and get a more sharp foto for you. The universe is moving...
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Old Nov 25, 2002, 8:12 AM   #7
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Quote:
Pictures of an unobscured moon follow the " sunny 16" rule or what ever the digital equivalent would be on your digicam,since the moon is an object in full sunlight.Therefore ,you dont need a long exposure.
Just like BigMike here, I've got good results with moon shots @ 1/500 f6.7, unless you want clouds shot in it as well, in which you have to open up the aperture a little.
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