Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Canon

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 22, 2005, 3:34 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

(I've been editing the thread so that there are less pictures in each post so the page won't be so long and slow-loading. Sorry for not realizing how the forum scripting here determined when to chop a page)

Hi, all!

Laugh all you want but I'm going to posts some stuff shot during my formative period starting last June or July with the non-zoom Canon A300... I then proceeded to massacre with Ulead PhotoImpact sometimes in order to hide the limitations of the camera or operator. These are all pre-Neat Image denoising plugin so I'll have to go back and fix some of the sky banding and mottles, and use my new and improved techniques ; }

First, looking toward Continental Divide on Glacier Park trail to Granite Park Chalet:


greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 22, 2005, 4:00 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Next, this is near the trail's end by Lake Otokomi, on east side of Continental Divide in Glacier. Yes, it really did look like that not long before sunset...


greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 4:14 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Above Glacier Park's Lake Otokomi, just before sunset. This natural ampitheater is huge, and on the back side of The Garden Wall - which is one of the main high skinny road thrills around these parts for most tourists who barely get out of their cars once they've crapped their pants or made the people in the oncoming lane do it ; }



Heaven's Peak, as seen through extensive forest fire damage from one of several huge fires in Northwest Montana (or the netire West really) a couple years ago. Why are people buying what the Sierrra Club says. This is not a thousand years ago when there wouldn't be consequences form all that smoke and fire and loss of natural resources that people actually need to build homes - and jobs. Oops, rant alert!

...I could never seem to get up on a trail for the longest time where the sun wasn't straight into the camera to shoot this peak. Then, when I finally did, I couldn't seem to get it quite right. I think I can salvage this one now however...

greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 4:25 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Something a little different to break up the monotony: Xena -



Yer's truly, holding the smoking gun. Don't put me away. This was takn by a friend on a cheap disposable film camera and scanned on a Canon LIDE80. I can't belive how bad some of these developing places are. I guess they only have one hour, though. I need to go back to this with Neat Image, as I do a lot of other scans of disposable and chapie camera shots I've accumulated.

greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 4:48 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 935
Default

You got some pretty awesome landscape scenery over there that's for sure. Nice Pics.
Kenny_Leong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 4:52 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Helloo all,

I bought a Panasonic FZ20 and you can see some pictures I took with it of similar territory, here at

== Zooooom ==

In spite of the excellent optics, responsiveness, layout, and menuing I returned it after a week because I had to work too hard to get some of the colors represented as I feel they actually are... There are a couple of major ranges of hues that seem to skew in opposite directions around the color wheel. That makes it rough to deal with subjects I tend to shoot and get what I think I should be seeing. But I did manage to shoot some decent stuff with it and continue in the process of posting some of what I shot over there in the Panasonic forum next door. So feel free to have a look...

Now, back to Canon A300 shots - this was taken in late fall, just beyond Glacier Park's Lake McDonald:

greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 5:06 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Kenny,

But you have all that great high country scenery and history like Doc Suzy's memoirs that makes ours look like barstools for elves. I'm clicking your profile right now to see some of that.

Meanwhile, here's an autumn scene of a beaver pond a few miles from home by mountain bike.


greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 7:17 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 207
Default

Greenboy,

Are you serious when you said you returned the Z20 camera due to color and/or hue problems?
Your pics from Z20 were great as I said before and I think better than your Canon pics on other site. They were nice too but Apgar Creek and Lake with mountains were truly beautiful.

Tell me you were kidding.Please and pretty please!
picsgalore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 12:35 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Hi picsgalore,

I did indeeed return it, and it was tough to make that decision because I liked so much about the camera. But almost every picture I took with it that I've looked at displays some characteristic hue skew problems. The ones that don't just don't seem to have those color ranges in them in the first place. I had to work hard on bringing them back in line in post production - whereas the Canon shots are from earlier in my digicam experiences; I've made some mistakes with them. But my A300 shot good color where very seldom was anything a few degrees off or more along the color wheel. So I didn't have to mess with that much at all. And realize that I got the A300 and 6 batteries, a charger and a 512 CF for $200.

Those color tendencies of the FZ have been noted on various review sites and by a fair number of people who own it or tried it, and on Imaging Resource the Imatest data shows pretty much the same thing. It won't bother everybody, but for my eye its really made a difference in my will to shoot. Someone suggested that maybe I got a bad one, but the same skews shown in that Imatest data were the ones I was experiencing in spite of the pictures appearing to pbe properly color balanced. I myself considered that, maybe other FZs do it to a lesser degree and could have exchanged for another FZ20 that was in stock, but -

I also like to shoot indoors and often in only marginal lighting conditions, and the FZ20 doesn't seem to be especially good at that. And it certainly doesn't make it easy to find out if that can be improved since the LCD and viewfinder don't gain up so that you can actually SEE the framing or subject properly. I just don't want to guess about whether the camera needs help in focusing. I can live with something that might not autofocus well (especially if it has a focus ring, which I have been accustomed to in video), but I need to see in order to use that well.

In general, I think all the manufacturers should address the basics like good visual feedback, fast response and quick repeated shooting, noise, and more accurate color renditions in every price range before moving on to some of the other cool stuff they are doing...

You may like the FZ20 or find it the best set of compromises for your intended uses, so again, let me say that just FOR ME, it wasn't. It's a lot of camera in other ways, and is very well laid out - though I probably would have had an even tougher decision to make if it would have had a swivel monitor ; }

* * *

Anyway... Here's an over-saturated version what I think is a great master. I will have to go back to and redo this one without so much "helping" ; } - this is in south Washington state not too far from the Snake River and Hell's Canyon, the trail to Palouse Falls.

The entire area for thousands of square miles around there has been dubbed The Scablands because of the effect of Montana's Lake Missoula. That was an incredibly huge body of water from melting ice pack of the receding ice age, dammed at one end by giant sheets of ice cubes. It finally floated them up into mountains on either side which shattered them, breaking through thousands of years ago and basically scarring out canyons and valleys and flattening landscape in a matter of hours, all the way to the Pacific Ocean. This may have happened a few times during that period, and that's the basis for the Columbia River, among other features below the High Palouse.

greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2005, 2:16 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
greenboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 101
Default

Here I'm on the "switchback" trail to Granite Park Chalet, looking out at one of the smaller burns from a couple summers ago, and the mountains and valleys and lakes that keep going and going and going.



I recropped this at the last moment because my A300 is often looking pretty soft on the far right margins depending on the direction I'm shooting in relative to the sun, what's there to detail, etc.
greenboy is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:01 AM.