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Old Mar 2, 2005, 4:37 PM   #1
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I recently acquired an SD300 and was messing around with it at lunch taking pics of my friends as they were doing hw.

Anyways, no matter how little or how long i set the long shutter feature, all the pics turned out EXTREMLY overexposed.

Was wondering whats the key to taking good long shutter shots? There was quite a bit of natural light in front of me... I tried fiddling with the ISO/EV features but nothing really worked...

thanks a lot
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Old Mar 2, 2005, 7:57 PM   #2
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Becks23 wrote:
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I recently acquired an SD300 and was messing around with it at lunch taking pics of my friends as they were doing hw.

Anyways, no matter how little or how long i set the long shutter feature, all the pics turned out EXTREMLY overexposed.

Was wondering whats the key to taking good long shutter shots? There was quite a bit of natural light in front of me... I tried fiddling with the ISO/EV features but nothing really worked...

thanks a lot
I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish....

Slower Shutter speeds are needed to get properly exposed images in less than optimum lighting. The long shutter feature of your Canon SD300 allows you to vary the shutter speed between 1 and 15 seconds.

This is a useful feature for taking photos of cityscapes or other night scenes (using a tripod to prevent motion blur from camera shake).

But, it would not be useful for taking photos intypical lightingconditions. The shutter speeds would be far too slow (resulting in overexposed images, as you experienced).

The shutter speed needed for proper exposure of an image depends on thelighting, the aperture (which you do not have the ability to control manually in the SD300), and the ISO speed.

To get a better idea of how these things impact exposure, see this handy online calculator. Note that "Film Speed" performs the same function astheISO speed setting in your camera:

http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/...alculator.html

In poor lighting, your SD300 will be using an aperture of f/2.8 at wide angle, stopping down to f/4.9 at full zoom (less light reaches the sensor when using zoom).

In better light, it may be using a smaller aperture (representing by a larger f/stop number). But, AFAIK,the SD300gives you no control over the aperture selected.
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Old Mar 3, 2005, 2:57 AM   #3
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thank you very much for the detailed reply!

for some reason i thought long shutter would produce pics like this one that my friend took with his Canon S230. So there isn't really a way to take time-lapse photo's under "optimal light conditions"?



so i assume the reason my friends pics turned out was because he took his pics in the dark

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Old Mar 3, 2005, 4:37 AM   #4
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I did something similar to that with my S1 IS - I spelled out some words using long shutter speed and the led operator/battery indicator of a Panasonic walkman cassette/radio I frequently use.
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