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Old May 1, 2005, 12:22 AM   #1
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Hello, I was just wondering if anybody can help me on indoor focusing and objects in motion with my S1 IS. Everything seems to work fine outside, but when indoors it seems to lack the focusing power and anything that moves ever so slightly becomes a giant blur. I've tried many settings but nothing seemed to quite work right. My settings are 0 exposure, no flash, 50 ISO speed, no BLK, vivid effect, 1600x1200, and superfine. Usually the focusing is fine if I don't zoom in at all but I really don't want to limit myself to just that. The blurring of anything moving is getting quite boring, though. Is all this normal for this camera or is mine not working correctly? I attached an example of the blur when I held the camera perfectly still with a slight zoom.

Thanks for any help.
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Old May 1, 2005, 2:11 AM   #2
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I haven't seen a digicam yet that focused very well indoors- especially if you zoom to the tele end. The Canon G5 I used for a while was absolutely terrible indoors unless I kept it at the wide angle end of the zoom, just as you mention with your model, and my girlfriend's Digital Elph S400 can't do a lick of decent shooting indoors.

You need a good focus assist beam, and since the digicams that have hot shoes do not enable the on-flash infrared assist beam, and their own built-in "focus assist" beams are a joke for the most part, your best bet for consistent indoor focusing is with (and I know lots of people don't want to hear this) a digital SLR like the Rebel XT or 20D, unless these newer digicams with the Digic II chip are vastly improved in this area. It's one of the major deterents to my geting a digicam and sticking with my 10D or Digital Rebel and living with the extra weight and mass. What good is a compact camera if you cannot get the shots you want with it?
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Old May 1, 2005, 2:26 PM   #3
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Yeah, that's what I was sort of afraid of. As of now, I'm just going to stick with what I have or maybe get a few lenses to play around with. I guess you can consider me a beginner so I don't exactly want to go all out with a $1000+ camera off the bat. Plus I'm only doing it for my own personal use so I guess it's not that important. I just want to make the best of what I have until maybe once I get out of college I might upscale a bit.
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Old May 2, 2005, 10:35 AM   #4
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use manual focus....at zoom which you use maximum, adjust
with omniselector manual focus for best image....
a "MF" apear on display....then you can zoom out, zoom in,
the focus rest the best for all the pictures you make.
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Old May 2, 2005, 10:52 AM   #5
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Bumping your ISO to 100 or 200 will help in two ways. It may be that your pictures are not "out of focus", but blurry from camera movement. Increase ISO speed will give you faster shutter speeds that will help with that. Second- faster ISO will give you an opportunuity for smaller apertures(higher f-numbers). This gives you greater depth of focus so more of your composition is in focus.

Remember that increasing ISO increases the "grainyness" of your picture. I've used 400ISO indoors without flash and the pictures are fine when they are small, but even filling a 15 inch monitor they are grainy.
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Old May 2, 2005, 2:17 PM   #6
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Low-light pics are tough--especially with small sensor ultra-zooms (although nearly all consumer and prosumer cameras have difficulties--this is where DSLRs shine). The only real way to overcome blurriness is to shoot with a flash. The flash will freeze the action and provide enough light....

If you really can't use flash, the next best thing is to boost the ISO. This will reduce the blurriness (hopefully) but it increases noise so you might need to clean u pthe noise using some noise removal software.

Lastly, you can try using a tripod. Tripod will reduce blurriness a little bit (probably not enough though)...
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Old May 2, 2005, 9:26 PM   #7
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Oh, wow. Increasing the ISO really did help. Before whenever anybody would move even the slightest bit or if I'm moving at all it would blur everything...except outdoors where it worked perfectly. I thought the higher the ISO is, the longer it would take to get the picture and the more blur it would have but I guess that's exposure. I guess I have alot to learn yet.

Thanks for all the help :-)
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Old May 3, 2005, 3:00 PM   #8
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QuadLogic wrote:
Quote:
Oh, wow. Increasing the ISO really did help. Before whenever anybody would move even the slightest bit or if I'm moving at all it would blur everything... except outdoors where it worked perfectly. I thought the higher the ISO is, the longer it would take to get the picture and the more blur it would have but I guess that's exposure. I guess I have alot to learn yet.

Thanks for all the help :-)
Yeah... ISO improves sensitivity and allows you to use higher shutter speeds...

You'll notice higher noise with higher ISO speeds though (noise is what shows up as little "dots" in the picture). I would try to stay close to or below ISO100 (but some people shoot at higher ISOs and use noise reduction software add-ons to clean up the image)...
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Old May 4, 2005, 7:46 PM   #9
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I have one more question and I'll stop pesting. I'm a newbie in photo taking and I just want to enhance my skills a little. My question is are the polarizer, UV filter, and fluorescent lenses worth it to get? Here's what I found on them:


(POLARIZER) Was made to remove the hazy effect that bright sunlight can cause in outdoor shooting situations. The filter can be rotated to determine the amount of reflection to be removed.
(A UV FILTER) serves to protect your lens from all dust, dirt, scratches and fingerprints. It also absorbs the Ultraviolet rays of the sun thereby reducing or eliminating distortion.
FLUORESCENT: The FD fluorescent light correction filter gives true to life color rendition by removing the harash yellow green cast ordinarily resulting from fluorescent bulbs. When shooting under natural light, flourescent filter dramatically increases color saturation of subjects.

They seem interesting but do they make enough difference to be worth the money? And if I buy them, do I need an adapter?

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Old May 5, 2005, 9:17 AM   #10
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I think you need that add-on lens adapter in order to use the filters. Double-check to make sure but I think you need it...

It's hard to say if the filters are "worth it". THis is similar to deciding whether wide-angle and telephoto add-on lenses are worth it. Filters WILL have a noticeable impact but are they worth the money? I don't know. If you are going to use the filters a lot (i.e. take a lot of pictures where the filter will show marked improvement) then it may be worth it. Otherwise, it probably isn't worth it RIGHT NOW. I bought the S1 IS a few months ago and decide that the filters and the lens add-ons are really not worth it FOR ME. I am just too much of a newbie for the filters to be of much use and it is not worth it given the price of the camera (I don't really want to spend, say, $100 on a $400 camera (25%) for just a filter or add-on lens or whatever (don't forget that you also need to buy the lens adapter)).

Since you are a newbie like me, you probably should master basic photography and then buy the filters/add-ons/whatever in a few months/years/etc.
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