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Old Dec 8, 2005, 10:34 AM   #1
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Hi, all - just got the A620 last week and, overall, like the camera (with any of these, you have to spend some time finding out where the weaknesses are, so you can compensate when shooting). There are a couple of usage issues that I think are important enough to share; I couldn't find them in Steve's review, but I'm not sure that anyone else is picking them up, either.

First issue is about histograms - there's no live histogram! I think any review should point this out, as a live histogram is so important to getting a good shot before you take it (so you're less likely to have to review, adjust, and take the shot again - if you can); what does Canon think this is - a dSLR?

The second issue has to due with the batteries - I've searched the manual and can find no way to tell what the remaining battery charge is; you've got to wait until the camera stops you from shooting and tells you to replace the batteries! This is another meaningful omission on Canon's part. A battery power gauge would have been really helpful on this camera.

Impressions - it's generally a reliable little camera. Flash exposure is something I have to pay attention to, so far - I find I have to crank the flash exposure down a stop or so, but I'm only basing this on the lcd version of the picture; I haven't had the time to set up a test series at different flash exposures (when I do, I'll be sure to evaluate it from a calibrated monitor, not the camera's lcd). I'm used to a KM 7D (dSLR), so there's a noticeable shutter lag with the A620, and it'll take some getting used to. Picture quality is fine, but even though this is a 7+ MP camera and my 7D is 6 MP, I'd use the dSLR for anything that was really important to me; the convenience, here, is that the A620 is easy to carry around. As for AS (KM's anti-shake), I never want to go without it! The A620's natural-light pictures are so much more pleasing thanits flash pictures, so some kind of image stabilization would have been great. Overall, I don't know how helpful my early report can be - I can't really compare it to other digicams, as I just scooped one up based on Steve's review and the fact that it allows me manual overrides and is relatively inexpensive (when you've got a dSLR, a digicam is a lower priority). If anybody's considering this or the A610, they seem to be great cameras in their range - as long as you can get along without a live histogram and a battery meter.




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Old Dec 8, 2005, 5:00 PM   #2
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Regarding the first issue- Canon has no live histograms...any, on any of their models. There is no mention, not because Steve failed to say anything about it, butbecause Canon never has had a live histogram. If you want that youshould avoid all Canon models.

Regarding the power level, yes, that to me is an issue with Canon's digicams. Their digital SLR's can go on for a long timeonce the powerlevel drops down to the low setting, but the G5 I once owned and my girlfriends S410 can last about 10 shots when the low level light comes on and then it's dead.


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Old Dec 9, 2005, 7:17 AM   #3
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As far as a battery power indicator goes, I think one of the issues is that a camera that can use AA alkaline, Lithium, or NiMH (which can be various power capacities)would need to know what kind of battery it is using in order to give you can accurate power status. And these three battery types present drastically different power signatures. So any measurement would not necessarily present an accurate answer. So perhaps Canon decided thatnot giving you a power indication was better than giving you a likely badreading. Otherwise everybody would then bitch that the power readings were wrong.

Cameras that use prioritory LiIon rechargeable batteries know what they are dealing with, so they can giveyou realistic feedback. The answer is that you should always carry a spare set of AA batteries with you. They can easily be switched if needed. It's one of theadvantages and disadvantagesof using a AA compatible camera.
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Old Dec 10, 2005, 2:12 AM   #4
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The two models I mentioned above, the G5 and S410, bothtake proprietary batteries, so the scenario regarding AA's being the only problemisn't quite accurate. In the case of the G5, it takes the same exact proprietarybattery used in the 10D, D60, Digital Rebel, D30 and 20D. Boththe 10D and Digital Rebeldigital SLR's will go to the "low" indicator and continue on for quite a while, where the G5goes dead just a handful of shots after that red battery sign starts flashing on the LCD- there is a definite difference in the way that battery is monitored by the G5 compared to the digital SLR's.
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