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Old Jan 2, 2006, 4:31 PM   #11
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Thanks for the input slipe, I'll check out the reviews for the cameras you mentioned.

Regarding the ISO and all that, I like to leave it as low as possible, for the noise factor. Anything more than 100 on my A85 comes out terrible.

The movement I'm worried about is my own, meaning camera shake. I know there's nothing I can do about subject movement, but I haven't encountered that problem. I think I'm just unsteady holding the camera while I look at the LCD and snap photos. I'm hoping to figure out if these cameras that have "image stabilization" technology really work. Meaning, all cameras advertise a red-eye reduction feature that never works. So I wouldn't want to go out and buy a prosumer camera and find out afterward that the stabilization stuff was B.S.

I'm looking mostly at the Canon S2. As stupid as this sounds, I like how it looks. (I'm thinking the same way I would buying a car. Performance is important, but I'd like to have a combo of function and style.) Plus, the Canon menus and software are very user-friendly.

Thanks again.
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 9:41 PM   #12
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Boldstar, one way to reduce camera shake is to use the optical viewfinder, rather than the LCD.

Using the LCD, you have to shoot with your arms extended, and frankly, I don't know anyone who doesn't shake at least a little bit in that posture.

Using the viewfinder (where you'll have to account for the fact that you're not seeing the full picture, so you'll need to crop tighter than before), not only can you brace your elbows against your body, but you can also brace the camera against your face, thereby substantially reducing camera shake.
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Old Jan 6, 2006, 9:56 AM   #13
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Thanks for the tip, I'll see if it makes a difference. Lots of people have told me that already, but I'm hesitant because it's more fun to use the LCD. Oh well.
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Old Jan 6, 2006, 9:37 PM   #14
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Boldstar,

It seems everyone here assumes that some of your pictures are blurry because you are not holding the camera steady, and that does appear to be the case; however, I think you need to definitely rule out camera fault first. You say you've tried different ISO's. That SHOULD have made a difference in the number of blurred images you get. The next time you find yourself in a situation where you are getting blurred images, try setting your camera on a solid surface and using the self timer to take the shot. If some of your images are still blurred, that indicates a problem with the camera. By the way, you'll need to try taking pics at different focal lengths. Even if the camera is faulty, it may focus well at certain focal lengths and not at others.
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Old Jan 7, 2006, 12:17 AM   #15
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Thanks for your input lucky. I'll try setting the camera on a surface. I don't think there's anything wrong with my camera... I think it's just camera-shake. In any case, I'll take a percentage of blurry shots and see if I can live with that number!


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